Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 101-01 Elementary French
Instructor: Anna Hudson
Course Description:
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.
1030:MTWRF   WESTC DURBIN
FREN 102-01 Elementary French
Instructor: Anna Hudson
Course Description:
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.101 or the equivalent.
0930:MTWRF   WESTC DURBIN
FREN 102-02 Elementary French
Instructor: Mrinmoyee Bhattacharya
Course Description:
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.101 or the equivalent.
1030:MTWRF   LIBRY ALDEN
FREN 102-03 Elementary French
Instructor: Mrinmoyee Bhattacharya
Course Description:
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.101 or the equivalent.
0830:MTWRF   LIBRY ALDEN
FREN 201-01 Intermediate French
Instructor: Lucile Duperron
Course Description:
Intensive second-year study of French, with attention to grammar review, conversation, reading in a cultural context and some writing. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
0930:MTWRF   ALTHSE 206
FREN 201-02 Intermediate French
Instructor: Lucile Duperron
Course Description:
Intensive second-year study of French, with attention to grammar review, conversation, reading in a cultural context and some writing. Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1030:MTWRF   ALTHSE 206
FREN 230-01 Communication in French and Francophone Contexts
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Intensive oral and written practice of French in the context of issues and themes such as a sense of place, the lessons of time, the social contract, and intellectual and artistic life. This course makes use of texts, films, multi media and interactive computer strategies in the development of conversational and writing skills. Intended as the gateway to the major or minor in French and Francophone Studies. Prerequisite: 201 or the equivalent.
0900:TR   BOSLER 309
0930:MW   BOSLER 309
FREN 230-02 Communication in French and Francophone Contexts
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Intensive oral and written practice of French in the context of issues and themes such as a sense of place, the lessons of time, the social contract, and intellectual and artistic life. This course makes use of texts, films, multi media and interactive computer strategies in the development of conversational and writing skills. Intended as the gateway to the major or minor in French and Francophone Studies. Prerequisite: 201 or the equivalent.
1330:MR   BOSLER 211
1330:TW   BOSLER 211
FREN 236-01 Introduction to Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Dominique Laurent
Course Description:
An introduction to the practice of reading and writing about French and francophone themes in an analytical and contextualized way. This course considers how cultural production conveys ideologies, values and norms expressed in both historical and contemporary contexts. Normally offered as writing-intensive. Prerequisite: 230.
1030:MWF   BOSLER 319
FREN 236-02 Introduction to Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Dominique Laurent
Course Description:
An introduction to the practice of reading and writing about French and francophone themes in an analytical and contextualized way. This course considers how cultural production conveys ideologies, values and norms expressed in both historical and contemporary contexts. Normally offered as writing-intensive. Prerequisite: 230.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 319
FREN 245-01 Contemporary Issues in French Society
Instructor: Adeline Soldin
Course Description:
Designed to give students an understanding of the main tensions and controversies of contemporary French culture. Focusing on political, social, and economic topics such as Americanization, regionalism, immigration, France's place in the European Union, the course should facilitate acculturation in France or provide an academic substitute for that experience. Prerequisite: 236.
1030:TR   BOSLER 319
FREN 246-01 Introduction to Francophone Cultures
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06. This course explores the relationship between literature and Francophone cultures (Vietnam, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa). Topics include: "Ngritude," the negro-African identity, "cultural mtissage," the status of women, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, and post-colonial disillusionment. Historical overview of the international context of Francophonie will be examined through short stories, novels, poems, critical essays, feature and documentary films. Prerequisite: 236.
1500:MR   BOSLER 319
FREN 362-01 Le Corps et le Corps Politique/The Body & the Body Politic: The French Enlightenment & Its Afterlife
Instructor: Mrinmoyee Bhattacharya
Course Description:
In this seminar, our two axes of inquiry will be the body the status of individual subjects and its relationship to the body politic the notion of nation, country, or culture -- that held subjects together. We will take as our point of departure some of the French Enlightenments most famous articulations on the relationship between individual and community, rights and freedoms of the individual, public and private sphere, and what it meant to be French in the age of the Revolution. The dynamic and diverse cultural and political landscape generated new ways of thinking about the most fundamental of questions: who is a citizen. What do secularism and freedom of religion really mean? How should we understand the interplay between enlightenment ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity and concurrent practices (slavery, colonialism, gender inequalities) that controvert those ideals? Through an engagement with documents such as the Code noir, which established standards for race and slavery, and Olympe de Gougess revolutionary Dclaration des droits de la Femme, this course will challenge us to look at the changing status of both individuals and the collectivity. We will study a wide range of literary texts, sources from architecture to philosophical treatises, political pamphlets to artistic performances as we try to trace the development of various visions of community and political rights. Works to be studied include texts by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Voltaire, Beaumarchais, Marivaux, Claire de Duras, Montesquieu, Franoise de Graffigny, Abb Grgoire and Denis Diderot among others, as well as a range of historical documents from the debates in the newly formed French National Assembly.
1330:W   LIBRY ALDEN
FREN 363-01 Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Instructor: Lucile Duperron
Course Description:
Sociolinguistics investigates how language is used in society, and how historical, geographical, social and individual factors determine the nature of language use. This course will introduce you to some main issues, theories, and methods of sociolinguistic research with a focus on the French language and French-speaking social contexts. You will also gain basic field experience by means of assignments that involve the participation of French-speaking contributors on and off campus. In order to capture the manifold aspects of sociolinguistic variation in French, you will: survey the history of the French language and how the French from Paris (Francien) became the official French language; describe and analyze varieties of contemporary French such as spoken vs. written French; or standard French vs. marginal French; or French outside France; examine how language accommodates and reflects social status (who speaks how, when, with whom?) or social changes (such as the making of new words and new communication practices in the face of technological development); discuss issues related to language use and variation such as gender (Is womens talk more accommodating or more emotional than mens talk? How about language change and LBGTQ rights?); language legislation (Can the French government control language use?); and language use in multilingual contexts (Why and how do people switch between languages?).
1330:MR   BOSLER 214