Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FLST 102-01 Fundamentals of Digital Film Production
Instructor: Julie Savage-Lee
Course Description:
This course provides instruction in the basic aesthetic and technical aspects of digital film production, including writing, producing, directing, shooting, lighting, recording and mixing sound, and editing. Students will learn to harness digital tools while focusing on their roles as storytellers. Each participant will write and direct a video, rotating through various crew positions as they carry out exercises designed to deepen their knowledge of the different elements of moviemaking. Ultimately, students will collaborate in teams on short movies, which will be screened at the final class. Prerequisite: FLST 101 OR FLST 310/ENGL 218. Offered every two years.
1330:M   BOSLER 208
FLST 201-01 The History of Film
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 279-01. An examination of the economic, cultural, technological, generic, formal, and aesthetic evolution of cinematic art, from 19th century precursors of the motion picture to the current state of world cinema. Between these bookends, the survey might include such developments as the medium's inception in 1895, early international (especially German, Soviet and French) classics in silent film, the rise of Hollywood, the emergence of sound, American censorship and classical Hollywood cinema, pre-war French classics, post-war Italian neo-realism, la nouvelle vague, Asian and third-world cinemas, eastern European and British developments at mid-century, and changes in the American film industry in the Sixties and Seventies. This course is cross-listed as HIST 279.
1500:MR   DENNY 211
FLST 210-01 A Star at the Table. Stories of Wine and Food in Italian Film and Media
Instructor: Giacomo Tagliani
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 323-01. Italy is widely known for its cultural heritage and way-of-life. Audiovisual media have represented this complex combination of human factors, landscape and social behavior in a multifaceted way and culinary arts is often at the center of these narratives. This course addresses the main elements of Italian wine and food culture by treating them as specific characters within filmic and media representations. Far beyond their having a decorative function, they often play key roles both in the fictional stories and everyday life. The course aims at analyzing the different visual and narrative strategies through which Italian films and media stage these elements in order to reconstruct the unique importance of food and wine in Italy's culture and society.
1130:MW   BOSLER 313
1900:W   BOSLER 314
FLST 210-02 Ancient Worlds on Film
Instructor: Christopher Francese
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CLST 140-01. An introduction to ancient Greek and Roman history and civilization (excluding mythology) through viewing popular films about this period and reading the historical and literary sources on which those films are based. Wherever possible we will read original primary documents.
1130:MWF   EASTC 405
FLST 210-03 Screening Korea: Film and Historical Understanding
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02 and EASN 204-01. Do national cinemas evolve with a countrys major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.
1500:TF   STERN 103
FLST 210-04 Israeli Cinema
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 260-01, MEST 200-02 AND JDST 216-01.Additional time slot: Wednesday 7:00pm-10:00pm in Althouse 106 for film viewing.The course illuminates trends and processes in Israeli cultural history and in current Israeli society, as represented in Israeli films from the 1960s to present day Israel. Screenings of Israeli films are a central part of the course. Films from present day Israel, including the most recent, as well as from earlier decades, create the ideological and cultural universe that the course illuminates.
0900:TR   BOSLER 208
FLST 210-05 Writing About Sexuality and Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-01, SPAN 231-01 AND WGSS 201-01. The primary goal of this writing intensive course is to develop students writing skills in Spanish. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work. The courses central aim is to help students in the development of ideas, creativity, organization, and basic research skills that shape strong academic writing. Throughout the semester students will broaden their lexicon and knowledge of Hispanic cultures through the critical analysis of film and literature. As we analyze various representations of sexuality, we will discuss what these expressions of pleasure and desire tell us about cultural practices, beliefs, values, and social institutions. In addition to readings, you will be asked to watch films outside of class.
0930:MWF   BOSLER 314
FLST 210-06 Soap, Sparkle, and Pop: Contemporary Korea
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 205-02. This course investigates and evaluates contemporary Korean popular culture, and more specifically the 21st century South Korean cultural phenomenon called hallyu (Korean Wave)its promises and limitations as well as its popularity and backlash against it. We will study television, manhwa (comic books), and music and ask how they participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, identity, modernity, tradition, ideology, and politics both regionally and globally. The course also aims to equip students with analytical tools to critically think about and understand popular culture.
1330:TF   STERN 103
FLST 210-07 History of Television from Broadcast to the Digital Era
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-02. This course examines the history of television from the Broadcast Era of the 1950s to the Digital Era of connected viewing. The course gives special attention to how television functions as a cultural forum for American society, and addresses historical shifts in media industries, government regulation, and representational practices. Selected texts may include: Marty, I Love Lucy, The Honeymooners, Amos n Andy, The Twilight Zone, Bewitched, All in the Family, Hill Street Blues, Thirtysomething, Twin Peaks, Seinfeld, Will & Grace, The Wire, Mad Men, Girls, and Glow.
1230:MWF   EASTC 405
FLST 210-08 Digital Media, Society, and Culture
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 221-02 and WRPG 211-02.
0930:MWF   EASTC 312
FLST 210-09 Introduction to Game Studies
Instructor: James Harris
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 222-01. Bridging the worlds of folklore, political science, narrative theory, design philosophy, and critical media studies, the nascent field of game studies offers a broad range of approaches and methodologies in service of answering the question: what can play teach us about ourselves? This course takes play seriously. We will begin by establishing a foundation for thinking critically about games and play before engaging with some fascinating examples of the possibilities (and pitfalls) of interactive entertainment. Readings may include theorists such as Johan Huizinga, Roger Caillois, Ian Bogost, Katherine Isbister, Patrick Jagoda, Janet Murray, Lisa Nakamura, Edmond Chang, and Adrienne Shaw. Possible games include Super Mario World, Call of Duty: Black Ops, Mafia 3, Cards Against Humanity, Secret Hitler, Papers Please, and Exploding Kittens. Students will complete two mid-terms covering key terms and concepts and a final group project in which they design and produce a game of their own for our end-of-semester Games Showcase. NOTE: You do not need to be proficient in gaming or design to take this course. As an entry-level course, students of all levels of comfort or familiarity should feel welcome to engage.
1130:MWF   EASTC 300
FLST 210-10 Digital Studio 1: Image Manipulation and Experimental Processes
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 223-01.
0930:MW   GDYRST 101
FLST 310-01 Homeland Security
Instructor: Giacomo Tagliani
Course Description:
This course centers on the representations of fears surrounding terrorism, immigration, and cloning that have spread in the US since the beginning of the 21st century. It analyzes these fears in film from an organic perspective, considering the political, symbolic and cultural aspects that they entail. Focusing on how film can contribute to create identities and communities based on the perceptions of these fears, we will discuss films on the war on terror (by directors such as Haggis, De Palma, Bigelow, Eastwood, and Friedkin), prevention (Lee, and the TV shows 24 and Homeland, immigration (Eastwood and Lee), and cloning (Bradbury, Spielberg, Lucas, and the TV show Westworld). Our analysis of movies and (episodes of) TV series will explore problematic relationships, such as interior/exterior and same/other, as well as the concept of border as a physical and symbolic place that regulates this relationship.
1500:TR   BOSLER 208
FLST 310-02 Cubania and Cuban Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01 and SPAN 380-01.Taught in Spanish. We will explore how film and documentary media shape national subjectivities in their presentation of history, culture, gender, sexuality, and politics. We will further our inquiry through readings, both in English and Spanish, from books and scholarly articles. Students should expect to invest a significant amount of time on film viewings outside of class, assigned readings, and multiple writing assignments as they sharpen their ability to analyze film content and technique. Participation in the May 21-28, 2018 trip to Cuba will be open to anyone taking this class. MetaMovments will be organizing the trip with a focus on developing an historical understanding of the African influence on Cuban culture and life over several Centuries; engaging with academics & historians, specializing in the multiple branches of Afro-Cuban ancestry: Yoruba, Congo, Arara, and Abakua, as well as strong Haitian & Jamaican traditions; and being immersed in the dance and music of the island, from the Afro-Cuban roots to the Salsa of today. Students will be have the opportunity to practice Afro-Cuban music and dance with groups like Raices Profundo and visit the International Film School and talk with filmmakers.
1330:TF   BOSLER 314
FLST 310-03 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 221-01. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
1330:TR   WEISS 327
FLST 310-04 Documentary Photography and The Picture Story
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 360-01. This course will explore and introduce experienced Black-and-White photographers to the traditional and contemporary use of Documentary Photography. By studying the history of photo-journalism, as wll as, contemporary artists, students will engage their surroundings and develop a body of photographic work based on short and long term photographic essays. The semester will culminate with an Exhibition of these photographic essays.
1530:TR   GDYRST 101
FLST 310-05 American Indians in Film and Media
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04 and ENGL 222-03.Students should be prepared for a weekly 2 1/2 hour film lab, day and time to be determined during the first week of class. From its earliest days, film has been an important medium of storytelling. Film also has been used to appropriate and manipulate the images of people, places and events. In particular, film as story has been used by both non-Native and Native directors and producers to capture images of Native peoples, and to construct or to represent their identities and lived realities in particular ways. For a brief moment during the Silent Film era, American Indians were able to control some of the stories told about them through film, thereby controlling the way film constructed their identities, their lived realities. From the close of the Silent Film era until the 1990s, Hollywood controlled the representation of Native Americans in film, effectively colonizing their identities. In recent decades, however, Native film producers, directors, screen writers, actors and actresses have been using film to present images and stories that more accurately reflect their own contemporary lived realities and identities. In so doing, they are decolonizing filmic representations of them. This course surveys two important topics with regards to the representation of Native North Americans in Film, TV and social media. The first topic is the colonization of Native identities and lived realities via cinematic imaging and redfacing. The second explores how contemporary Native North American film makers engage in visual sovereignty to tell their stories in a way that challenges and decolonizes U.S. and Canadian representations of Native North American peoples.
0930:MWF   DENNY 212
FLST 310-06 Independent American Cinema
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 351-01.A core of American cinema has historically defined itself as independent from the Hollywood studio system. While many filmmakers identify as independent because they do not rely on outside funding, others identify their independence in terms of a style of filmmaking. In this course, we will examine different forms of independent cinema from the 1950s to the present day, attending to how changing structures in the film industry influenced competing ideologies of cinematic independence. Filmmakers may include: Andy Warhol, John Cassavetes, George A. Romero, Dennis Hopper, Melvin Van Peebles, John Waters, Martin Scorcese, David Lynch, Errol Morris, Lizzie Borden, Richard Linklater, Quentin Tarantino, Harmony Korine, Greta Girwig, Karyn Kusama, Sean Baker, and Barry Jenkins.
1030:MWF   BOSLER 208
FLST 500-01 Film in the 1960's
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-04 American Indians in Film and Media
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 222-03 and FLST 310-05.Students should be prepared for a weekly 2 1/2 hour film lab, day and time to be determined during the first week of class. From its earliest days, film has been an important medium of storytelling. Film also has been used to appropriate and manipulate the images of people, places and events. In particular, film as story has been used by both non-Native and Native directors and producers to capture images of Native peoples, and to construct or to represent their identities and lived realities in particular ways. For a brief moment during the Silent Film era, American Indians were able to control some of the stories told about them through film, thereby controlling the way film constructed their identities, their lived realities. From the close of the Silent Film era until the 1990s, Hollywood controlled the representation of Native Americans in film, effectively colonizing their identities. In recent decades, however, Native film producers, directors, screen writers, actors and actresses have been using film to present images and stories that more accurately reflect their own contemporary lived realities and identities. In so doing, they are decolonizing filmic representations of them. This course surveys two important topics with regards to the representation of Native North Americans in Film, TV and social media. The first topic is the colonization of Native identities and lived realities via cinematic imaging and redfacing. The second explores how contemporary Native North American film makers engage in visual sovereignty to tell their stories in a way that challenges and decolonizes U.S. and Canadian representations of Native North American peoples.
0930:MWF   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in ARTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 223-01 Digital Studio 1: Image Manipulation and Experimental Processes
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-10. This course will focus on 2-dimensional studio processes in the digital environment. It will also explore how digital processes can be used in conjunction with traditional processes like drawing, painting, and printmaking. The initial goal of this class will be to gain a thorough understanding of Adobe Photoshop for image manipulation. As the semester progresses, the class will explore uses of digital technology in contemporary art practice, including experimental processes. *Please note: this is not a photography course, some photo related processes will be part of the class, but those students looking for a more traditional approach to photography should consider the 221 Intro to Photography class. Prerequisite: 122, 221, or permission of the instructor.
0930:MW   GDYRST 101
ARTH 360-01 Documentary Photography and The Picture Story
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 310-04. This course will explore and introduce experienced Black-and-White photographers to the traditional and contemporary use of Documentary Photography. By studying the history of photo-journalism, as wll as, contemporary artists, students will engage their surroundings and develop a body of photographic work based on short and long term photographic essays. The semester will culminate with an Exhibition of these photographic essays.
1530:TR   GDYRST 101
Courses Offered in CLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CLST 140-01 Ancient Worlds on Film
Instructor: Christopher Francese
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-02. An introduction to ancient Greek and Roman history and civilization (excluding mythology) through viewing popular films about this period and reading the historical and literary sources on which those films are based. The course focuses on the stories of remarkable men and women from antiquity, what those stories reveal Greek and Roman values and ideas, and ways to apply those insights critically to our own time.
1130:MWF   EASTC 405
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 204-01 Screening Korea: Film and Historical Understanding
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-03 and HIST 215-02. Do national cinemas evolve with a countrys major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.
1500:TF   STERN 103
EASN 205-02 Soap, Sparkle, and Pop: Contemporary Korea
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-06. This course investigates and evaluates contemporary Korean popular culture, and more specifically the 21st century South Korean cultural phenomenon called hallyu (Korean Wave)its promises and limitations as well as its popularity and backlash against it. We will study television, manhwa (comic books), and music and ask how they participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, identity, modernity, tradition, ideology, and politics both regionally and globally. The course also aims to equip students with analytical tools to critically think about and understand popular culture.
1330:TF   STERN 103
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-02 History of Television from Broadcast to the Digital Era
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-07. This course examines the history of television from the Broadcast Era of the 1950s to the Digital Era of connected viewing. The course gives special attention to how television functions as a cultural forum for American society, and addresses historical shifts in media industries, government regulation, and representational practices. Selected texts may include: Marty, I Love Lucy, The Honeymooners, Amos n Andy, The Twilight Zone, Bewitched, All in the Family, Hill Street Blues, Thirtysomething, Twin Peaks, Seinfeld, Will & Grace, The Wire, Mad Men, Girls, and Glow.
1230:MWF   EASTC 405
ENGL 221-02 Digital Media, Society, and Culture
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-08 and WRPG 211-02.
0930:MWF   EASTC 312
ENGL 222-01 Introduction to Game Studies
Instructor: James Harris
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-09. Bridging the worlds of folklore, political science, narrative theory, design philosophy, and critical media studies, the nascent field of game studies offers a broad range of approaches and methodologies in service of answering the question: what can play teach us about ourselves? This course takes play seriously. We will begin by establishing a foundation for thinking critically about games and play before engaging with some fascinating examples of the possibilities (and pitfalls) of interactive entertainment. Readings may include theorists such as Johan Huizinga, Roger Caillois, Ian Bogost, Katherine Isbister, Patrick Jagoda, Janet Murray, Lisa Nakamura, Edmond Chang, and Adrienne Shaw. Possible games include Super Mario World, Call of Duty: Black Ops, Mafia 3, Cards Against Humanity, Secret Hitler, Papers Please, and Exploding Kittens. Students will complete two mid-terms covering key terms and concepts and a final group project in which they design and produce a game of their own for our end-of-semester Games Showcase. NOTE: You do not need to be proficient in gaming or design to take this course. As an entry-level course, students of all levels of comfort or familiarity should feel welcome to engage.
1130:MWF   EASTC 300
ENGL 222-03 American Indians in Film and Media
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04 and FLST 310-05.Students should be prepared for a weekly 2 1/2 hour film lab, day and time to be determined during the first week of class. From its earliest days, film has been an important medium of storytelling. Film also has been used to appropriate and manipulate the images of people, places and events. In particular, film as story has been used by both non-Native and Native directors and producers to capture images of Native peoples, and to construct or to represent their identities and lived realities in particular ways. For a brief moment during the Silent Film era, American Indians were able to control some of the stories told about them through film, thereby controlling the way film constructed their identities, their lived realities. From the close of the Silent Film era until the 1990s, Hollywood controlled the representation of Native Americans in film, effectively colonizing their identities. In recent decades, however, Native film producers, directors, screen writers, actors and actresses have been using film to present images and stories that more accurately reflect their own contemporary lived realities and identities. In so doing, they are decolonizing filmic representations of them. This course surveys two important topics with regards to the representation of Native North Americans in Film, TV and social media. The first topic is the colonization of Native identities and lived realities via cinematic imaging and redfacing. The second explores how contemporary Native North American film makers engage in visual sovereignty to tell their stories in a way that challenges and decolonizes U.S. and Canadian representations of Native North American peoples.
0930:MWF   DENNY 212
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 215-02 Screening Korea: Film and Historical Understanding
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 204-01 and FLST 210-03. Do national cinemas evolve with a countrys major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.
1500:TF   STERN 103
HIST 279-01 The History of Film
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 201-01. This course concerns the emergence and development of the film industry and the various conditions that have and continue to influence it. While artistic considerations are certainly important, the making of films is also a commercial enterprise in which financial concerns are paramount. Moreover, since films enjoy enormous popularity with virtually all in society, regardless of age or education, the political and moral content of films is a constant concern for private as well as governmental organizations. Therefore, this course is also about how competing and often incompatible tensions -- artistic, financial, political, and moral -- have influenced the making of films. This course is cross-listed as FMST 201.
1500:MR   DENNY 211
Courses Offered in ITAL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ITAL 323-01 A Star at the Table. Stories of Wine and Food in Italian Film and Media
Instructor: Giacomo Tagliani
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-02.Italy is widely known for its cultural heritage and way-of-life. Audiovisual media have represented this complex combination of human factors, landscape and social behavior in a multifaceted way and culinary arts is often at the center of these narratives. This course addresses the main elements of Italian wine and food culture by treating them as specific characters within filmic and media representations. Far beyond their having a decorative function, they often play key roles both in the fictional stories and everyday life. The course aims at analyzing the different visual and narrative strategies through which Italian films and media stage these elements in order to reconstruct the unique importance of food and wine in Italy's culture and society.
1130:MW   BOSLER 313
1900:W   BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in JDST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
JDST 216-01 Israeli Cinema
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-04 and MEST 200-02 and RELG 260-01.Additional time slot: Wednesday 7:00pm-10:00pm in Althouse 106 for film viewing.The course illuminates trends and processes in Israeli cultural history and in current Israeli society, as represented in Israeli films from the 1960s to present day Israel. Screenings of Israeli films are a central part of the course. Films from present day Israel, including the most recent, as well as from earlier decades, create the ideological and cultural universe that the course illuminates.
0900:TR   BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 200-01 Writing About Sexuality and Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-05 and SPAN 231-02 and WGSS 201-01. The primary goal of this writing intensive course is to develop students writing skills in Spanish. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work. The courses central aim is to help students in the development of ideas, creativity, organization, and basic research skills that shape strong academic writing. Throughout the semester students will broaden their lexicon and knowledge of Hispanic cultures through the critical analysis of film and literature. As we analyze various representations of sexuality, we will discuss what these expressions of pleasure and desire tell us about cultural practices, beliefs, values, and social institutions. In addition to readings, you will be asked to watch films outside of class.
0930:MWF   BOSLER 314
LALC 300-01 Cubania and Cuban Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 310-02 and SPAN 380-01. Taught in Spanish. We will explore how film and documentary media shape national subjectivities in their presentation of history, culture, gender, sexuality, and politics. We will further our inquiry through readings, both in English and Spanish, from books and scholarly articles. Students should expect to invest a significant amount of time on film viewings outside of class, assigned readings, and multiple writing assignments as they sharpen their ability to analyze film content and technique. Participation in the May 21-28, 2018 trip to Cuba will be open to anyone taking this class. MetaMovments will be organizing the trip with a focus on developing an historical understanding of the African influence on Cuban culture and life over several Centuries; engaging with academics & historians, specializing in the multiple branches of Afro-Cuban ancestry: Yoruba, Congo, Arara, and Abakua, as well as strong Haitian & Jamaican traditions; and being immersed in the dance and music of the island, from the Afro-Cuban roots to the Salsa of today. Students will be have the opportunity to practice Afro-Cuban music and dance with groups like Raices Profundo and visit the International Film School and talk with filmmakers.
1330:TF   BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in MEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEST 200-02 Israeli Cinema
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-04 and JDST 216-01 and RELG 260-01.Additional time slot: Wednesday 7:00pm-10:00pm in Althouse 106 for film viewing.The course illuminates trends and processes in Israeli cultural history and in current Israeli society, as represented in Israeli films from the 1960s to present day Israel. Screenings of Israeli films are a central part of the course. Films from present day Israel, including the most recent, as well as from earlier decades, create the ideological and cultural universe that the course illuminates.
0900:TR   BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 250-01 Religion and the Internet
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
(e.g., Goddess and Devotee; Women & Religion; Sexuality and Spirituality; Women's Ways of Believing)
1030:TR   DENNY 212
RELG 260-01 Israeli Cinema
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-04, JDST 216-01 and MEST 200-02.Additional time slot: Wednesday 7:00pm-10:00pm in Althouse 106 for film viewing.The course illuminates trends and processes in Israeli cultural history and in current Israeli society, as represented in Israeli films from the 1960s to present day Israel. Screenings of Israeli films are a central part of the course. Films from present day Israel, including the most recent, as well as from earlier decades, create the ideological and cultural universe that the course illuminates.
0900:TR   BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-02 Writing About Sexuality and Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-05, WGSS 201-01 and LALC 200-01. The primary goal of this writing intensive course is to develop students writing skills in Spanish. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work. The courses central aim is to help students in the development of ideas, creativity, organization, and basic research skills that shape strong academic writing. Throughout the semester students will broaden their lexicon and knowledge of Hispanic cultures through the critical analysis of film and literature. As we analyze various representations of sexuality, we will discuss what these expressions of pleasure and desire tell us about cultural practices, beliefs, values, and social institutions. In addition to readings, you will be asked to watch films outside of class.
0930:MWF   BOSLER 314
SPAN 380-01 Cubania and Cuban Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 310-02 and LALC 300-01.We will explore how film and documentary media shape national subjectivities in their presentation of history, culture, gender, sexuality, and politics. We will further our inquiry through readings, both in English and Spanish, from books and scholarly articles. Students should expect to invest a significant amount of time on film viewings outside of class, assigned readings, and multiple writing assignments as they sharpen their ability to analyze film content and technique. Participation in the May 21-28, 2018 trip to Cuba will be open to anyone taking this class. MetaMovments will be organizing the trip with a focus on developing an historical understanding of the African influence on Cuban culture and life over several Centuries; engaging with academics & historians, specializing in the multiple branches of Afro-Cuban ancestry: Yoruba, Congo, Arara, and Abakua, as well as strong Haitian & Jamaican traditions; and being immersed in the dance and music of the island, from the Afro-Cuban roots to the Salsa of today. Students will be have the opportunity to practice Afro-Cuban music and dance with groups like Raices Profundo and visit the International Film School and talk with filmmakers.
1330:TF   BOSLER 319
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 201-01 Writing About Sexuality and Cinema
Instructor: Margaret Frohlich
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-05, LALC 200-01 and SPAN 231-02. The primary goal of this writing intensive course is to develop students writing skills in Spanish. Both in class and homework assignments approach writing as a process, and students will engage in drafts, peer editing, and revisions of their work. The courses central aim is to help students in the development of ideas, creativity, organization, and basic research skills that shape strong academic writing. Throughout the semester students will broaden their lexicon and knowledge of Hispanic cultures through the critical analysis of film and literature. As we analyze various representations of sexuality, we will discuss what these expressions of pleasure and desire tell us about cultural practices, beliefs, values, and social institutions. In addition to readings, you will be asked to watch films outside of class.
0930:MWF   BOSLER 314
Courses Offered in WRPG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WRPG 211-02 Digital Media, Society, and Culture
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 221-02 and FLST 210-08.
0930:MWF   EASTC 312