Spring 2017

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FLST 102-01 Fundamentals of Digital Film Production
Instructor: Julie Savage-Lee, Nicoletta Marini Maio
Course Description:
This course provides instruction in the basic aesthetic and technical aspects of digital film production, including writing, producing, directing, shooting, lighting, recording and mixing sound, and editing. Students will learn to harness digital tools while focusing on their roles as storytellers. Each participant will write and direct a video, rotating through various crew positions as they carry out exercises designed to deepen their knowledge of the different elements of moviemaking. Ultimately, students will collaborate in teams on short movies, which will be screened at the final class. Prerequisite: FLST 101 OR FLST 310/ENGL 218. Offered every two years.
1330:M   BOSLER 208
FLST 201-01 The History of Film
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 279-01. An examination of the economic, cultural, technological, generic, formal, and aesthetic evolution of cinematic art, from 19th century precursors of the motion picture to the current state of world cinema. Between these bookends, the survey might include such developments as the medium's inception in 1895, early international (especially German, Soviet and French) classics in silent film, the rise of Hollywood, the emergence of sound, American censorship and classical Hollywood cinema, pre-war French classics, post-war Italian neo-realism, la nouvelle vague, Asian and third-world cinemas, eastern European and British developments at mid-century, and changes in the American film industry in the Sixties and Seventies. This course is cross-listed as FLST 201.
1330:TR   DENNY 110
FLST 210-01 Ancient Worlds on Film
Instructor: Christopher Francese
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CLST 140-01.An introduction to ancient Greek and Roman history and civilization (excluding mythology) through viewing popular films about this period and reading the historical and literary sources on which those films are based. Wherever possible we will read original primary documents.
1130:MWF   EASTC 405
FLST 210-02 Screening Korea: Film and Historical Understanding
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 204-01 and HIST 215-02. Do national cinemas evolve with a countrys major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.
1330:R   DENNY 204
FLST 210-03 The American Sitcom
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-03. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American televisions most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcoms popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genres strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of public sphere in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.
1500:TF   EASTC 405
FLST 210-04 Italian Cinema
Instructor: Nicoletta Marini Maio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 324-01.Additional Time Slot: Thursday 1:30 - 2:30 for Italian and INBM students in Bosler 314 Latin Lovers, Divas, Spaghetti Westerns, and Other Narratives of Failure. This course is a general introduction to Italian cinema, from the origins to the present. It provides students with basic tools for film analysis and analyzes a selection of films and directors within their cultural and social contexts. This course is offered in English. Italian Studies majors, Italian minors and INBM majors using this course to satisfy major/minor requirements will attend a discussion group in Italian and will write their papers in Italian. Upon successful completion of the work in Italian, students will receive a FLIC: Italian notation on their transcript.
1900:W   ALTHSE 106
1230:M   BOSLER 213
1230:W   BOSLER 314
FLST 310-02 "Lost" in Interpretation
Instructor: Nicoletta Marini Maio
Course Description:
Research skills and extended writing are required at this level.An intertextual analysis of the ABC television series "Lost" (2004-2010) which will examine the ways in which quality television may constitute a new form of valuable culture. Readings include selections from Dante, Shakespeare, Locke, Rousseau, Carroll, Dostoevsky, Schmitt, Conrad, Sartre, Said, Foucault, Deleuze, and Appiah.
1500:TR   BOSLER 306
Courses Offered in CLST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CLST 140-01 Ancient Worlds on Film
Instructor: Christopher Francese
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-01. An introduction to ancient Greek and Roman history and civilization (excluding mythology) through viewing popular films about this period and reading the historical and literary sources on which those films are based. Wherever possible we will read original primary documents.
1130:MWF   EASTC 405
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-03 The American Sitcom
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-03. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American televisions most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcoms popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genres strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of public sphere in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.
1500:TF   EASTC 405
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 215-02 Screening Korea: Film and Historical Understanding
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 204-01 and FLST 210-02. Do national cinemas evolve with a countrys major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.
1330:R   DENNY 204
HIST 279-01 The History of Film
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 201-01. This course concerns the emergence and development of the film industry and the various conditions that have and continue to influence it. While artistic considerations are certainly important, the making of films is also a commercial enterprise in which financial concerns are paramount. Moreover, since films enjoy enormous popularity with virtually all in society, regardless of age or education, the political and moral content of films is a constant concern for private as well as governmental organizations. Therefore, this course is also about how competing and often incompatible tensions -- artistic, financial, political, and moral -- have influenced the making of films. This course is cross-listed as FLST 201.
1330:TR   DENNY 110
Courses Offered in ITAL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ITAL 324-01 Italian Cinema
Instructor: Nicoletta Marini Maio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-04.Additional Time Slot: Thursday 1:30 - 2:30 for Italian and INBM students in Bosler 314 Latin Lovers, Divas, Spaghetti Westerns, and Other Narratives of Failure. This course is a general introduction to Italian cinema, from the origins to the present. It provides students with basic tools for film analysis and analyzes a selection of films and directors within their cultural and social contexts. This course is offered in English. Italian Studies majors, Italian minors and INBM majors using this course to satisfy major/minor requirements will attend a discussion group in Italian and will write their papers in Italian. Upon successful completion of the work in Italian, students will receive a FLIC: Italian notation on their transcript. This course is a general introduction to Italian cinema, from the origins to the present. It provides students with basic tools for film analysis and analyzes a selection of films and directors within their cultural and social contexts.This course is offered in English. Italian Studies majors, Italian minors and INBM majors using this course to satisfy major/minor requirements will attend a discussion group in Italian and will write their papers in Italian. Upon successful completion of the work in Italian, students will receive a FLIC: Italian notation on their transcript. Prerequisites: 231 if taken as Italian FLIC; none, if taking the English only portion. Offered on an as-needed basis. This course is cross-listed as FLST 310.
1900:W   ALTHSE 106
1230:M   BOSLER 213
1230:W   BOSLER 314