Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CMST 230-01 Documentary Film-Making: Insight, Understanding and Production
Instructor: James Guardino
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 210-01. This course provides instruction in documentary film-making, including video-taped interviews, shooting, lighting, audio recording, and editing. In addition to the technical aspects of film making, the course will incorporate theoretical examinations of message design,and the socio-cultural impact of documentary films and the documentary film industry to help guide students in the production of socially relevant documentary films of their own conception. Students will produce their own mini-documentary videos about subject-matter of their choosing, and be responsible for theoretical and technical writings in support of their films. Prerequisites: SOCI 240 OR ANTH 240 OR AMST 302.
1330:TR   BOSLER 306
Courses Offered in CRWR
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
CRWR 219-01 Screenwriting
Instructor: Khris Baxter
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 211-01. This course will familiarize students with the fundamentals of good screenwriting: structure, theme, conflict, character, and dialogue. Students take part in weekly writing exercises as preparation for their final class project--creating a detailing outline of an original screenplay, and completing the first act. Topics include plot and subplot, character development, and commercial considerations such as format and genre. Students are required to read essential books on scriptwriting and to analyze several films and the screenplays on which they are based.
1330:W   BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in EASN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
EASN 205-01 War and Memory in East Asian Literature and Film
Instructor: Peter Bates
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 210-02. This class examines Japanese and Chinese representations of the war they fought between 1937 and 1945, along with Japanese representations of war with the United States. It explores film and fiction from Japan and China created both during and after the war. We will investigate questions of memory, victimization and responsibility as well as how artists attempted to represent experiences that stretched the boundaries of imagination. Priorities:
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 222-01 Audience Cultures
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-01. What does it mean to be part of an audience? How does being situated in different communities of readers, film-goers, or television viewers affect the way that we value, experience, and interpret texts? What differentiates the casual audience member from the fan or fanatic? This course will explore these and other questions relating to media audiences while also introducing students to critical theories and research methodologies employed in the field of audience/fan studies.
1330:TF   BOSLER 208
ENGL 311-02 The American Auteur
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 310-01. Auteurs are usually defined as filmmakers whose individual styles and extraordinary control over the elements of production allow them to create unique films that reflect their own personalities and artistic preoccupations. In this class we will examine the work of four or five contemporary American directors who are usually identified as auteurs. Through examinations of their films and through discussions of film authorship and culture in the United States, we will interrogate the concept of auteurism as it functions in America today.
1500:TF   BOSLER 208
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 200-02 Framing the Marginal I/Eye
Instructor: Amaury Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SPAN 231-04 and FMST 210-03. How is the marginal I/Eye fashioned and embodied in its encounter with power and other individuals? In what ways does the I/Eye serve as an organizing principle around which tactics and strategies of resistance, revolt, and social justice are mobilized? In this course, we will explore the different ways individuals go about occupying that I/Eye, how they maintain and/or challenge it, and how they are compelled and/or inspired to present it to themselves and those around them. Our primary objects of study will be texts produced in Spain, Latin America, and the Caribbean, and the visual reproductions carried out by film directors from these regions as well as from the United States. On one hand, our conversations will center on the historical, cultural, political space marginal writers, artists, activists occupied and the I-texts they composed. On the other, our discussions will assess the cinematic eye each director crafted in their adaptation and appropriation of the marginal I. Throughout, we will address and unpack the ethical and aesthetic negotiations present in packaging these subject/visual positions.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305
Courses Offered in SPAN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SPAN 231-04 Framing the Marginal I/Eye
Instructor: Amaury Sosa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-02 and FMST 210-03. How is the marginal I/Eye fashioned and embodied in its encounter with power and other individuals? In what ways does the I/Eye serve as an organizing principle around which tactics and strategies of resistance, revolt, and social justice are mobilized? In this course, we will explore the different ways individuals go about occupying that I/Eye, how they maintain and/or challenge it, and how they are compelled and/or inspired to present it to themselves and those around them. Our primary objects of study will be texts produced in Spain, Latin America, and the Caribbean, and the visual reproductions carried out by film directors from these regions as well as from the United States. On one hand, our conversations will center on the historical, cultural, political space marginal writers, artists, activists occupied and the I-texts they composed. On the other, our discussions will assess the cinematic eye each director crafted in their adaptation and appropriation of the marginal I. Throughout, we will address and unpack the ethical and aesthetic negotiations present in packaging these subject/visual positions.
1330:MR   BOSLER 305