Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 130-01 Introduction to Environmental Science: Energy, Waste, and Human Health
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management where the application of natural science principles informs an understanding of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement and use, waste management, and human population dynamics and environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using public databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects; and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Spring semester.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:T   KAUF 109
ENST 130-02 Introduction to Environmental Science: Energy, Waste, and Human Health
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management where the application of natural science principles informs an understanding of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement and use, waste management, and human population dynamics and environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using public databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects; and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Spring semester.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:R   KAUF 109
ENST 132-01 Foundations of Environmental Science
Instructor: Brian Pedersen
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement, waste management, and human environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using federal databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. This course is designed for students with a special interest in Environmental Studies and will focus on quantitative and qualitative methods for environmental analysis and critical thinking in preparation for future study. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131, OR, one course in BIOL, CHEM, ERSC, or PHYS, OR, AP credit in one of these areas. Offered in Spring semester.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:W   KAUF 113
ENST 132-02 Foundations of Environmental Science
Instructor: Brian Pedersen
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement, waste management, and human environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using federal databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. This course is designed for students with a special interest in Environmental Studies and will focus on quantitative and qualitative methods for environmental analysis and critical thinking in preparation for future study. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131, OR, one course in BIOL, CHEM, ERSC, or PHYS, OR, AP credit in one of these areas. Offered in Spring semester.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:R   KAUF 113
ENST 215-01 Jewish Environmental Ethics
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 215-01 and RELG 215-01.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Robyn Burns-Kennedy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01 and ERSC 218-01.
0900:TR   KAUF 185
1330:R   KAUF 186
ENST 310-01 Ornithology
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 401-01.The classroom component of this course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and conservation biology of birds. Students will have numerous opportunities both in and outside of the classroom to examine conservation issues and actions as they relate to the functioning of natural ecosystems, the consequences of anthropogenic impacts to those environments and learn how sustainability practices influence many bird species, populations and communities. The lab portion of this course will focus on hands-on learning through a variety of tools, mechanisms and field experiences including but not limited to use of study skins and skeletons, field guides, optics and field-monitoring techniques. Students will be regularly immersed in living labs during field trips both local and regional including visits to a bird banding station, state wildlife management areas and research study sites. In addition students will learn how to identify birds through specific behaviors, visual field marks, songs and calls. There will be at least one day-long field trip during a weekend, one extended lab field trip to a waterfowl stopover habitat during spring migration and an optional 4-5 day field trip over spring break to visit other sites utilized by birds in and outside of Pennsylvania. Each student will also complete a research paper on selected ornithological topics.
1130:MWF   RNORTH 1317
1230:F   RNORTH 1317
ENST 311-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 260-01 and ARCH 260-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments.
0930:MWF   DENNY 204
ENST 311-02 March to Extinction: The Impact of Climate Change on Biodiversity
Instructor: Candie Wilderman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 401-02. In this course, students and faculty will examine ecological and evolutionary principles as they pertain to biological conservation, historical patterns of natural extinction, and the current status and nature of the Holocene/Anthropocene extinction. We will focus on the nature of the evidence concerning the impact of recent climate change on biodiversity, including the contribution of citizen science. The impact on human communities and livelihoods will be discussed within the larger context of why it matters. Proposed designs for enhancing mitigation and adaptation strategies and for protecting and restoring ecosystem resilience will be studied. In addition to reading the literature and hosting guest speakers, students will each choose a case study to explore in depth through literature and primary research. Students will be responsible for sharing the results of their research in extended presentations which will include their own customized reading assignments and enhancement exercises. This course may count as a theme course in both the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors.
1030:TR   KAUF 187
ENST 311-03 Energy Justice: People, Politics, and the Environment
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-03. This class surveys the energy landscape of our carbon-centered civilization. From the local to the global, we question the social, political, and environmental implications of non-renewable energy resource extraction, transportation, and use. We will examine how energy associated risks and benefits are managed across people and places. The contemporary social and political landscape for global energy demand and extraction provides the foundation for the class. Analysis of individual and university-wide energy consumption will allow for localized reflection on course themes. Drawing from examples in India and the United States, we will explore development and justice considerations associated with natural resource extraction for energy purposes. A review of the social, economic, and health impacts for people directly impacted by energy procurement and transport will provide further lenses to explore justice concerns. Political and scientific efforts to improve the sustainability of energy extraction will also be analyzed. The class is structured to be accessible to students across disciplines.
1330:MR   KAUF 178
ENST 311-04 Climate Change, Rivers, and Chinese Society
Instructor: Ann Hill, Kelin Zhuang
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-01, EASN 206-01 and ERSC 311-01. Permission of Instructor Required. This course is an interdisciplinary, globally integrated course that begins with a two-week field trip to North China in January 2015. Sites visited on the field trip introduce students to the geography of the Yellow River basin and sites of human habitation long the river's course, as well as some sites that help students understand Chinas history more broadly. During the field trip portion of the course, students will create blogs and podcasts to post on a website based on their experiences in China. The course integrates climate change in East Asia and its geography with the history of populations that are identified with the Chinese state. The course focuses equally on 1) the impact of long term changes in the climate and land forms of the region, especially its large river systems, and 2) the consequences of human activity for environmental change as populations exploit natural environments, especially rivers, for livelihood, state revenues, and the market. Although the course is broadly historical, it includes case studies to illustrate in concrete detail critical aspects of longer-term trends, such as course shifts in the Yellow River, the role of irrigation in the formation of Chinese civilization, deforestation in North China, the Three Gorges Dam project, agricultural sustainability, and other important topics.
0900:TR   KAUF 178
ENST 311-05 Spatial Literacy Across the Curriculum
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-01 and PMGT 290-01. Understanding how to think about problems and concepts in a spatial context is a fundamental skill that is not well taught in the current Dickinson College curriculum. Alternatively referred to as Spatial Literacy or Spatial Reasoning, this type of thinking generally focuses on understanding the importance of geographic space and the relationships formed by this space. Spatial literacy, like writing and quantitative analysis, is not a stand-alone subject, but rather it is a way of thinking that is applicable to many fields of studies, and is becoming increasingly important as a valuable competency for liberal arts students throughout all divisions. This course will examine the importance of geographic space as a learning construct and explore the value of spatial literacy for problem solving, creative expression, and communication across the humanities, social science and scientific disciplines. In doing so, students will have the opportunity to consider topics within their specific areas of study, and to discover how the application of spatial thinking can enable and facilitate the problem solving process across the curriculum. Students will be introduced to an assortment of easy-to-use mapping tools that include both quantitative and qualitative techniques, and will learn how to use these tools to investigate issues and questions from a spatial perspective, incorporate spatial analysis techniques into their problem solving methodologies, and to effectively visualize their data in ways that promote a more comprehensive understanding of the problem statement.
1500:MR   STERN 11
ENST 311-06 The Politics of Environmental Protection in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01 and POSC 390-03. This seminar takes a close look at the political, social, and legal issues that affect environmental protection in Asia. Focusing attention on China, Taiwan, Japan, and India, and by drawing upon scholarly literature in political science, sociology, law, and history, the course aims to provide students with a multidisciplinary understanding of the myriad factors which shape the content of environmental legislation and policies and how these are implemented in society. Does China's authoritarian system give environmental law more "bite"? What roles do NGO play in Asia? Does Confucianism or Hinduism make people more or less inclined to protect the environment? How do Asians deal with the impact of rapid economic growth? In short, we will try to understand the complex interaction between political, legal, and social dimensions of environmental protection in a region that is home to half of the world's population and three of the world's current and future economic powerhouses.
1330:W   BOSLER 214
ENST 311-07 Sustainability: Social Justice and Human Rights
Instructor: Joyce Bylander
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-02. History "is a crab scuttling sideways, a drip of soft water wearing away stone, an earthquake breaking centuries of tension." (Solnit, Rebecca, Hope in the Dark, 2004). This course will examine the importance of the environmental movement and broader definitions of sustainability. We will explore examples of direct action, of serendipitous change, and of world-changing events that have moved us more clearly toward an understanding of "our" shared future on this planet. We will survey the issues connected to sustainable systems and will focus more specifically on issues related to food, water and energy. Through readings, film, and experiential activities the course will challenge us to analyze the impact of various actors and assess our own responsibility.
1330:MR   WESTC DURBIN
ENST 311-08 Environmental & Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-05.This course reviews social inequities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of notions of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we will explore how marginalized communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across places exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. A review of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to explore collective action to contest social and environmental injustices.
1500:TR   TOME 115
ENST 330-01 Environmental Policy
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 130, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.
1030:TR   KAUF 178
ENST 332-01 Natural History of Vertebrates
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 332-01.
1030:MWF   DANA 101
1330:W   RNORTH 1317
ENST 335-01 Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
An interdisciplinary study of the aquatic environment, with a focus on the groundwater and surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin. This course provides a scientific introduction to the dynamics of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and estuarine systems as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the political and social issues involved in the sustainable use of these aquatic resources. Students conduct an original, cooperative, field-based research project on a local aquatic system that will involve extensive use of analytical laboratory and field equipment. Extended field trips to sample freshwater and estuarine systems and to observe existing resource management practices are conducted. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Generally offered in the fall in a two-year alternating sequence with 340.
0900:TR   KAUF 116
1230:W   KAUF 116
ENST 406-01 The Global Supply Chain
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
This senior seminar will explore the complexities of the interlocked set of actors and policies that together convey products and services around the world. We will examine the science of globalized products from phones to clothing, and their impacts on human health and the environment; relevant policies on the local, national, and international scale; the role of diverse actors ranging from international corporations to individual consumers; life cycle analysis and other sustainability tools used to assess the global impacts of this trade; and the environmental justice aspects of global trade at home and abroad. As a capstone in the Environmental Studies and Science majors, this course will use case studies of global trade and its impacts to highlight the complexity of modern environmental concerns and to develop critical skills for understanding and addressing these difficult problems. Interested nonmajors from other departments (with adequate environmental preparation) are welcome.
1330:T   KAUF 178
ENST 550-01 UN Security Resolutions and the Environment
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-02 The Role of Privilege in Accessing Food in Carlisle, Pennsylvania
Instructor: Meghan Reedy
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-03 Carlisle Transportation Study
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-04 Disproportionate Environmental Burden: Flame Retardant Exposure and Socioeconomic Status
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description: