Spring 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 111-01 American Nature Writing: Environment, Cultures, and Values
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-06. Perhaps no genre of literature is as uniquely American as American nature writing. No genre can tell us as much about our environment, environmental culture, and the values that derive from and depend upon our natural environment. We will also work to define "nature" and to understand the complex connections between humans and the nonhuman environment they inhabit. Our guides will be Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Terry Tempest Williams, Bill McKibben, and others. The course will be a study of metaphor, poetic and prose styles, and the link between literary and naturalistic observation. Our texts will be literary; our contexts will be environmental, cultural, and ethically ecological. Are humans a part of the natural environment? Do we see ourselves as distinct from nature? Is our environment beautiful and benign (sunsets, daffodils, puffins) or ugly and destructive (hurricanes, cancer, death)? We will examine the current importance (as well as the controversial aspects) of evolutionary ideas, and we will emphasize the role played by literature in the development of our own environmental assumptions and values. Two essays and a final exam.
0900:TR   EASTC 405
ENST 130-01 Introduction to Environmental Science: Energy, Waste, and Human Health
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:R   KAUF 109
ENST 130-02 Introduction to Environmental Science: Energy, Waste, and Human Health
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:T   KAUF 109
ENST 132-01 Foundations of Environmental Science
Instructor: Brian Pedersen
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement, waste management, and human environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using federal databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. This course is designed for students with a special interest in Environmental Studies and will focus on quantitative and qualitative methods for environmental analysis and critical thinking in preparation for future study. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131, OR, one course in BIOL, CHEM, ERSC, or PHYS, OR, AP credit in one of these areas. Offered in Spring semester.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:W   KAUF 113
ENST 132-02 Foundations of Environmental Science
Instructor: Brian Pedersen
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement, waste management, and human environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using federal databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. This course is designed for students with a special interest in Environmental Studies and will focus on quantitative and qualitative methods for environmental analysis and critical thinking in preparation for future study. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131, OR, one course in BIOL, CHEM, ERSC, or PHYS, OR, AP credit in one of these areas. Offered in Spring semester.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:R   KAUF 113
ENST 206-01 American Environmental History
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 206-01. Part of the Eco-E Path Mosaic.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
ENST 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Nicola Tynan
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 222-01.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 110
ENST 310-01 Limnology: The Study of Lakes
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 401-04. In this course, students will learn about the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of lakes, ponds, reservoirs, and wetlands and the interactions that shape these aquatic ecosystems. This course considers the connections between lake ecosystems and the atmosphere and their watersheds including the running waters and ground waters that modify and transport components of the land to the lake. Students will apply information learned through field trips, lectures, class exercises, case studies, and discussion of relevant literature to investigate environmental problems associated with aquatic ecosystem response to human manipulations and disturbances ranging from global to local scales. Students will become familiar with common methods used for studying lakes, ponds, reservoirs, and wetlands through field trips to local sites and analytical techniques in the laboratory. This experience will culminate in a field-based group research project. This course can fulfill the intermediate core course requirement currently fulfilled by ENST 335/340 or be used as a theme course for environmental studies or environmental
1030:TR   KAUF 116
1330:M   KAUF 116
ENST 310-02 Wildlife Ecology
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 401-01.
1030:MWF   KAUF 109
1330:M   KAUF 109
ENST 310-03 Ornithology
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 401-02. The classroom component of this course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and conservation biology of birds. Students will have numerous opportunities both in and outside of the classroom to examine conservation issues and actions as they relate to the functioning of natural ecosystems, the consequences of anthropogenic impacts to those environments and learn how sustainability practices influence many bird species, populations and communities. The lab portion of this course will focus on hands-on learning through a variety of tools, mechanisms and field experiences including but not limited to use of study skins and skeletons, field guides, optics and field-monitoring techniques. Students will be regularly immersed in living labs during field trips both local and regional including visits to a bird banding station, state wildlife management areas and research study sites. In addition students will learn how to identify birds through specific behaviors, visual field marks, songs and calls. There will be at least one day-long field trip during a weekend, one extended lab field trip to a waterfowl stopover habitat during spring migration and an optional 4-5 day field trip over spring break to visit other sites utilized by birds in and outside of Pennsylvania. Each student will also complete a research paper on selected ornithological topics.
1130:MWF   RNORTH 1317
1230:W   RNORTH 1317
ENST 311-01 Economics of Natural Resources
Instructor: Nicola Tynan
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 332-01.Permission of Instructor RequiredThis course uses microeconomics to analyze the use and conservation of natural resources, including energy, minerals, fisheries, forests, and water resources, among others. Broad themes include the roles of property rights, intergenerational equity, and sustainable development in an economy based on resource exploitation.
0900:TR   KAUF 185
ENST 311-02 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 260-01 and ANTH 260-01.The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments.
1030:MWF   DEAL 1
ENST 311-03 Environmental Degradation of the Yellow River, China
Instructor: Kelin Zhuang
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ERSC 311-01 and EASN 206-04. Yellow River, central of the rise of Chinese civilization, is the most turbid river in the modern world; however, its water was clear 1000 years ago. What has happened to this river? This interdisciplinary introductory-level course focuses on the environmental degradation in the Yellow River beginning 5000 years ago. The course is aimed at both science and non-science students alike. There are no prerequisites. Topics covered will include 1) Climate change in the Yellow River drainage basin since the Holocene, including a brief temperature and drought history since the Neolithic Age; 2) The impacts of deforestation and human reclamation on Yellow River and its significance to fluvial and sediment discharge; 3) Frequent river course shifts and their relationship to environmental degradation and human activities; 4) Fluvial and sediment budget and sedimentation in the lower reaches and offshore area; and 5) The socio-economic impacts of the historical river course shifts and their significance to regional sustainability development.
0900:TR   BOSLER 307
ENST 318-01 Advanced Applications in GIS
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ERSC 318-01 and ARCH 318-01.
0930:MWF   KAUF 185
1330:F   KAUF 186
ENST 330-01 Environmental Policy
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 130, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.
0900:TR   KAUF 179
ENST 330-02 Environmental Policy
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 130, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.
1330:MR   KAUF 187
ENST 406-01 The Future of Conservation in a Changing World
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
We appear to be entering the sixth major extinction of biodiversity in the history of life on earth. Unlike the previous five mass extinctions, this one is largely a result of human activity. The field of conservation biology has developed to face the challenge of protecting the worlds biological diversity and to better understand human impacts on species, communities, and ecosystems. In recent decades, conservation views and priorities have been called into question as scientists document the broad-scale effects of climate change on ecosystems across the globe. We are faced with the question: how do we protect or restore ecosystems when the baseline environmental conditions like temperature and precipitation are changing? As ecosystems becoming increasingly human-dominated, what do we consider wild or pristine ecosystems and how do we prioritize conservation of natural resources? In this course, we will focus on the underlying science involved in conservation issues and discuss the various new perspectives for managing our natural resources. This discussion will include the science supporting different schools of thought as well as the ethical, political, and economic issues related to assigning value to ecosystems and the services they provide and conserving the natural world. Three hours classroom a week.
1330:W   KAUF 116
ENST 500-01 Developing Web-Based GIS Applications - Part 2
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-01 Ecological Literacy
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-02 Natural Sheep Health
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-03 Impacts of Urban Design on Social Spaces: A Carlisle, PA Case Study
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-04 Soil Concentration and Plant Availability of Lead
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description: