Fall 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 111-01 American Nature Writing: Environment, Cultures, and Values
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-04.
1030:TR   KAUF 179
ENST 131-01 Introduction to Environmental Science: Natural Ecosystems and Human Disruption
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor required.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 207
1330:R   KAUF 109
ENST 131-02 Introduction to Environmental Science: Natural Ecosystems and Human Disruption
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor required.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:T   KAUF 116
ENST 131-03 Introduction to Environmental Science: Natural Ecosystems and Human Disruption
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor required.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
1330:W   KAUF 116
ENST 151-01 History of Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 151-01.
1030:MWF   DENNY 313
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01 and ERSC 218-01.
0930:MWF   KAUF 185
1330:F   KAUF 186
ENST 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 222-01.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 110
ENST 222-02 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 222-02.
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 201
ENST 310-01 Eurasian Invasion, The Columbian Exchange: Biology That Changed the World
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 401-01. Beginning in 1492 there has been an exchange of all levels of fauna and flora across the globe. This exchange is known as the Columbian Exchange. The biological consequences of this exchange have been dramatic and all ecosystems on this globe have been altered. Today there exists two Europes, two Africas and two Asias as a result of this exchange of species. One of each exists in the original geographic location and the other in the United States. This course will explore the impact of invasive species on the ecosystems in Central Pennsylvania and to a lesser extent the rest of the United States and the World. This is a field based course. Students will visit local examples of invasive damage, local labs and meet scientists that manage invasive species. Students will also discover the controversies surrounding the purposeful introduction of many species that have become important parts of our local ecosystems.
1030:MWF   KAUF 109
1330:M   KAUF 109
ENST 311-01 Looking Across the Pacific: Japanese and American Environmental History
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02 and HIST 211-02. Cultural comparison can be a powerful tool to get us to question our assumptions and to make the familiar seem unfamiliar. With this in mind, this class juxtaposes the environmental histories of the United States and Japan, highlighting radical differences, unexpected similarities, and transpacific connections. Separate units will question each cultures definitions of nature, examine different relationships with indigenous cultures, compare energy strategies, with a particular focus on the Three Mile Island and Fukushima disasters, and finally examine how these cultures have influenced each other through the exchange of organisms and ideas.
1030:TR   DENNY 204
ENST 311-02 Buddhism and the Environment
Instructor: Daniel Cozort
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 311-01.Although protection of the environment is not a Buddhist goal per se, it is involved in the quest for enlightenment. The course will apply the Buddhist perspective to questions about the relations between humans and the rest of nature, to specific environmental problems, to the tradeoffs between human good and protection of other species, and to consumption and consumerism.
1500:TF   EASTC 300
ENST 311-03 Food and American Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-01. This class examines the ways that the culture and politics of food have reshaped North American landscapes and social relations from colonial to modern times. We will explore, for example, how the new taste for sweetness fueled the creation of plantations worked by enslaved, the ways that the distribution of frozen meat helped build cities and clear rangeland, and the ways that the eating of fresh fruit came to depend on both a new population of migrant laborers and a new regime of toxic chemicals. Other topics will include catastrophes such as the Dustbowl, the controversial transformations of the Green Revolution, and the modern debates about the obesity epidemic.
1500:TF   DENNY 204
ENST 311-04 Cities, Environment and Health
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
Most of the world's population now lives in urban areas. This course will address the impacts and opportunities of cities for both public health and the environment. Particular attention will be given to megacities in the developing world, addressing public health needs, environmental impacts, and possible development paths. We'll consider the consequences of different types of urban design, the history and future of health infrastructure, and the challenges of creating healthy and sustainable cities.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 110
ENST 311-05 Environmental Activism
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
This course explores how a range of actors engage in activism to contest environmental harm. Through in depth analysis of activism, the opportunities and challenges associated with environmental protest are reviewed. Course material and exercises encourage students to explore how narratives of environmental protest reflect and respond to how people use and experience natural resources, and how cultural norms and expectations provide particular terrains to encourage or discourage environmental activism. Drawing from national and international examples, diverse means and methods of environmental activism are reviewed including: blogs, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), online petitions, litigation, street rallies, and shareholder activism.
1030:MWF   KAUF 187
ENST 311-06 Environment and Society
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Margaret Mead famously warned, "we won't have a society if we destroy the environment". This course aims to understand how society is intimately dependent on natural resources, and how human actions alter the environment. The class serves as a gateway for students to gain qualitative skills necessary to analyze social and environmental issues through problem identification, assessment of challenges, solution review, and the formation of an argument based on evidence. These skills will be learned through analysis of the human implications of contemporary environmental challenges including: climate change, hydraulic fracturing, and food justice.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 07
ENST 311-07 Global Environmental Challenges and Governance
Instructor: Cornelius Leary
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with INST 290-03 and SUST 330-01.Part of the Global Climate Change Mosaic.
0930:MWF   KAUF 178
ENST 311-08 The Environment, Conflict and Peace
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-06. Despite the fact that most of the world's seven billion people are living longer, consuming more and getting better educated, many people on the planet have paradoxically become much less secure due to the scale of consumption and pollution in today's carbon-based societies. Global environmental hanges - deforestation, losses of biodiversity, land degradation, the depletion of fish stocks, water pollution and scarcity, toxic contamination and climate change -- are felt worldwide and the sites of esource consumption are located a world away the sites of resource extraction. This course examines the two most prominent ways in which global environmental change undermines human security. First, we will focus on how environmental change may induce conflict because violent conflict is a powerful source of human insecurity. Second, we will examine the ways in which environmental change undermines human security by putting at risk people's basic needs, human rights and the things they value in order to lead dignified lives. Examining the links between environmental change and human security allows us to examine questions of human vulnerability, the dynamics of conflict, cooperation and peace, equity and justice and sustainable development. The class will engage with academic debates in the field along with practical, policy relevant information.
0900:TR   TOME 117
ENST 330-01 Environmental Policy
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 130, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.
1030:TR   KAUF 187
ENST 340-01 Forest Ecology & Applications
Instructor: Brian Pedersen
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 320-01.
1030:MWF   KAUF 113
1230:W   KAUF 113
ENST 406-01 Understanding the Human Place in Nature: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.
1330:M   KAUF 187
ENST 550-01 Weed Ecology at the Dickinson College Farm
Instructor: Maria Bruno
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-02 Disproportionate Environmental Burden: Flame Retardant Exposure and Socioeconomic Status
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-03 The Impact of the Built Environment on Youth Mentorship
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-04 Carlisle Transportation Study
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
 
ENST 550-05 The Role of Privilege in Accessing Food in Carlisle, Pennsylvania
Instructor: Meghan Reedy
Course Description: