Spring 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 130-01 Introduction to Environmental Science: Energy, Waste, and Human Health
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management where the application of natural science principles informs an understanding of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement and use, waste management, and human population dynamics and environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using public databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects; and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Spring semester.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 106
1330:M   KAUF 109
ENST 130-02 Introduction to Environmental Science: Energy, Waste, and Human Health
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management where the application of natural science principles informs an understanding of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement and use, waste management, and human population dynamics and environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using public databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects; and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Spring semester.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 106
1330:T   KAUF 109
ENST 132-01 Foundations of Environmental Science
Instructor: Katie Stumpf
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement, waste management, and human environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using federal databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. This course is designed for students with a special interest in Environmental Studies and will focus on quantitative and qualitative methods for environmental analysis and critical thinking in preparation for future study. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131, OR, one course in BIOL, CHEM, ERSC, or PHYS, OR, AP credit in one of these areas. Offered in Spring semester.
0930:MWF   KAUF 113
1330:W   KAUF 113
ENST 132-02 Foundations of Environmental Science
Instructor: Katie Stumpf
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement, waste management, and human environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using federal databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. This course is designed for students with a special interest in Environmental Studies and will focus on quantitative and qualitative methods for environmental analysis and critical thinking in preparation for future study. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisites: 131, OR, one course in BIOL, CHEM, ERSC, or PHYS, OR, AP credit in one of these areas. Offered in Spring semester.
0930:MWF   KAUF 113
1330:R   KAUF 113
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: Peter Muller
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 218-01 and ERSC 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218.
1330:R   KAUF 109
0900:TR   KAUF 185
ENST 310-02 Methods in Environmental Health Sciences
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
A lab-based overview of environmental health sciences, particularly exposure assessment, toxicology, and epidemiology, and their application to policy and regulation. Traditional environmental health concerns including air pollution, water pollution, and waste management will be addressed, with attention to the context of natural environmental systems. We will also consider more novel environmental health problems, including ubiquitous low-level toxic exposures, and the connections between urban health and sustainability. Laboratory work will emphasize quantitative and qualitative assessment of environmental health data (e.g., particulate matter pollution; neighborhood design), as well as the connection of this data to public policy.
1330:M   KAUF 113
0930:MWF   KAUF 178
ENST 311-01 Environmental Archaeology
Instructor: Hendrik Van Gijseghem
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 260-01 and ARCH 260-01. The study of the human past requires knowledge of the biological and geophysical systems in which cultures developed and changed. This course explores past environments and the methods and evidence used to reconstruct them. Emphasis is on the integration of geological, botanical, zoological, and bioarchaeological data used to reconstruct Quaternary climates and environments.
1230:MWF   DENNY 212
ENST 311-02 Environment and Society
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-05. Society defines how collections of humans are organized around shared bonds including cultures, contexts, or identities. Margaret Mead famously warned, we wont have a society if we destroy the environment. This course aims to understand how society is intimately dependent on natural resources, and how human actions alter the environment. Drawing from social science methods, this class highlights how societies are intimately dependent on natural resources, and how human actions alter the environment. Students will examine how collections of humans experience, use, and change the environment. They will gain knowledge in social change, and how social movements and activists frame challenges. Concepts of development, justice, and power will be examined in relation to pressing environment and society challenges.
1330:TR   KAUF 187
ENST 318-01 Advanced Applications in GIS
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 318-01 and ERSC 318-01. The course is intended as a continuation of the introductory course on Geographic Information Systems, 218, and will concentrate on more advanced discussions and techniques related to spatial analysis and GIS project design. The main focus of the course will be on using higher-level GIS methods to investigate and analyze spatial problems of varying complexity; however, the specific project and topical applications will vary depending on student interests. Students will be required to develop and complete an individual spatial analysis project that incorporates advanced GIS techniques. Prerequisite: ENST 218 or ERSC 218 or ARCH 218 or equivalent GIS experience. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 318 and ARCH 318. Offered every two years.
1330:F   KAUF 109
0930:MWF   KAUF 185
ENST 330-01 Environmental Policy
Instructor: Gregory Howard
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 130, or permission of instructor.
1030:TR   KAUF 187
ENST 406-01 Environmentalism & Capitalism
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Some argue that a livable planet and capitalism are not compatible. Others contend that environmentalism is not equipped to address contemporary ecological and social challenges, and that the environmental movement has become a special interest. As a capstone in Environmental Studies and Science, this course will examine assertions about modern environmentalism and capitalism from natural science, social science, and humanities perspectives. Following a review of key course concepts, we will explore differing ideas on the use or abuse of capitalism as a tool to address environmental problems and related ecological and social outcomes. Students will select case studies of interest that exemplify the opportunities and contradictions associated with efforts to address environmental and social concerns in an era of capitalism. For example, students could examine a range of issues that explore the commodification of nature and people including: payment for ecosystem services; carbon trading; royalty payments for resource extraction; economic valuation of human life; environmental health offsets; etc.. Student topics will frame the focal areas for course case studies, and will allow us to examine capitalism and environmentalism in practice.
1330:W   ALTHSE 109
ENST 550-01 Diatoms as Evidence of Long Term Climate Change
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description: