Fall 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENST 111-01 American Nature Writing: Environment, Cultures, and Values
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-03. A study of the effects of scientific, religious, and philosophical values on human attitudes toward the environment and how these attitudes may affect our way of life. By focusing on a particular current topic, and by subjecting the basis of our behavior in regard to that topic to careful criticism, alternative models of behavior are considered together with changes in lifestyle and consciousness that these may involve. This course fulfills the Humanities (Division I A) distribution requirement.
1330:MR   TOME 115
ENST 130-01 Introduction to Environmental Science: Energy, Waste, and Human Health
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management where the application of natural science principles informs an understanding of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement and use, waste management, and human population dynamics and environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using public databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects; and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. This course fulfills the Lab Sciences (Division III) distribution requirement. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Spring semester.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 106
1330:R   KAUF 109
ENST 130-02 Introduction to Environmental Science: Energy, Waste, and Human Health
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management where the application of natural science principles informs an understanding of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement and use, waste management, and human population dynamics and environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using public databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects; and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. This course fulfills the Lab Sciences (Division III) distribution requirement. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Spring semester.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 106
1330:W   KAUF 109
ENST 131-01 Introduction to Environmental Science: Natural Ecosystems and Human Disruption
Instructor: Brian Pedersen
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human impact on them. Basic concepts of ecology, such as biogeochemical materials cycling, energy flow, biotic interactions, and ecosystem regulation will be examined and utilized to study natural resource management, population dynamics, loss of biodiversity, and environmental pollution. Field study, including measurement of parameters in natural aquatic and terrestrial systems, data analysis, and data interpretation will be emphasized. This course fulfills the Lab Sciences (Division III) distribution requirement. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Fall semester.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:W   KAUF 113
ENST 131-02 Introduction to Environmental Science: Natural Ecosystems and Human Disruption
Instructor: Brian Pedersen
Course Description:
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of natural environmental systems and human impact on them. Basic concepts of ecology, such as biogeochemical materials cycling, energy flow, biotic interactions, and ecosystem regulation will be examined and utilized to study natural resource management, population dynamics, loss of biodiversity, and environmental pollution. Field study, including measurement of parameters in natural aquatic and terrestrial systems, data analysis, and data interpretation will be emphasized. This course fulfills the Lab Sciences (Division III) distribution requirement. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Fall semester.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:R   KAUF 113
ENST 206-01 American Environmental History
Instructor: Gregory Kaliss
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 206-01. Examines the interaction between humans and the natural environment in the history of North America. Explores the problem of sustainable human uses of the North American environment from the pre-colonial period to the present. Also serves as an introduction to the subfield of environmental history, which integrates evidence from various scientific disciplines with traditional documentary and oral sources. Topics include: American Indian uses of the environment, colonial frontiers, agricultural change, industrialization, urbanization, westward expansion, the Progressive-Era conservation movement, changes in lifestyle and consumption including their increasingly global impact, shifts in environmental policy, and the rise of the post-World War II environmental movement. This course is cross-listed as HIST 206. This course fulfills the Social Sciences (Division II) distribution requirement.
0900:TR   DENNY 212
ENST 218-01 Geographic Information Systems
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ERSC 218-01 and ARCH 218-01. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful technology for managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data and geographically-referenced information. It is used in a wide variety of fields including archaeology, agriculture, business, defense and intelligence, education, government, health care, natural resource management, public safety, transportation, and utility management. This course provides a fundamental foundation of theoretical and applied skills in GIS technology that will enable students to investigate and make reasoned decisions regarding spatial issues. Utilizing GIS software applications from Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), students work on a progression of tasks and assignments focused on GIS data collection, manipulation, analysis, output and presentation. The course will culminate in a final, independent project in which the students design and prepare a GIS analysis application of their own choosing. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory per week. This course is cross-listed as ERSC 218 and ARCH 218. This course fulfills the QR graduation requirement.
1330:F   ALTHSE 204
0930:MWF   KAUF 185
ENST 310-01 Eurasian Invasion, The Columbian Exchange: Biology That Changed the World
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
Cross-listed with BIOL 401-01.Beginning in 1492 there has been an exchange of all levels of fauna and flora across the globe. This exchange is known as the Columbian Exchange. The biological consequences of this exchange have been dramatic and all ecosystems on this globe have been altered. Today there exists two Europes, two Africas and two Asias as a result of this exchange of species. One of each exists in the original geographic location and the other in the United States. This course will explore the impact of invasive species on the ecosystems in Central Pennsylvania and to a lesser extent the rest of the United States and the World. This is a field based course. Students will visit local examples of invasive damage, local labs and meet scientists that manage invasive species. Students will also discover the controversies surrounding the purposeful introduction of many species that have become important parts of our local ecosystems.
0930:MWF   KAUF 109
1330:M   KAUF 109
ENST 310-02 Agriculture/Food Studies
Instructor: Katie Stumpf
Course Description:
An interdisciplinary intermediate-level approach to the study of environmental problems and policy analysis. The course is project-oriented, with students bringing the experience and perspective of their own disciplinary major to bear on a team approach to the analysis and proposed resolution of an environmental problem. Topics vary depending on faculty and student interests, and on the significance of current affairs. Three hours of classroom and three hours of laboratory a week. Prerequisite: Dependent upon topic or permission of instructor.
1330:T   KAUF 113
0930:MWF   KAUF 187
ENST 311-03 Buddhism and the Environment
Instructor: Daniel Cozort
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 311-01.Although protection of the environment is not a Buddhist goal per se, it is involved in the quest for enlightenment. The course will apply the Buddhist perspective to questions about the relations between humans and the rest of nature, to specific environmental problems, to the tradeoffs between human good and protection of other species, and to consumption and consumerism.
1500:TR   EASTC 300
ENST 311-04 Environmental & Social Justice
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-05.This course reviews social inequities in relation to environmental issues. We examine the social construction of notions of equity and justice, and apply this learning to understand how societies frame environmental risk. Drawing from domestic and international case studies, we will explore how marginalized communities disproportionately experience environmental externalities. The social and environmental consequences of uneven development across places exemplify justice and capitalism contradictions. A review of community agency to re-appropriate or reframe their environment will allow us to explore collective action to contest social and environmental injustices.
1330:TR   WESTC DURBIN
ENST 330-01 Environmental Policy
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
This course examines the effect of environmental policies on environmental quality, human health and/or the use of natural resources at local, national and international levels. It considers the ways scientific knowledge, economic incentives and social values merge to determine how environmental problems and solutions are defined, how risks are assessed and how and why decisions are made. The course examines a range of tools, processes and patterns inherent in public policy responses and covers issues ranging from air and water pollution and toxic and solid waste management to energy use, climate change and biodiversity protection. A combination of lectures, case studies, and field trips will be used. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 130, or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the WID graduation requirement.
1030:TR   KAUF 178
ENST 335-01 Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
Instructor: Kristin Strock
Course Description:
An interdisciplinary study of the aquatic environment, with a focus on the groundwater and surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin. This course provides a scientific introduction to the dynamics of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and estuarine systems as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the political and social issues involved in the sustainable use of these aquatic resources. Students conduct an original, cooperative, field-based research project on a local aquatic system that will involve extensive use of analytical laboratory and field equipment. Extended field trips to sample freshwater and estuarine systems and to observe existing resource management practices are conducted. Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Generally offered in the fall in a two-year alternating sequence with 340.
1230:W   KAUF 116
0900:TR   KAUF 178
ENST 406-01 Environmentalism and Capitalism
Instructor: Heather Bedi
Course Description:
Some argue that a livable planet and capitalism are not compatible. Others contend that environmentalism is not equipped to address contemporary ecological and social challenges, and that the environmental movement has become a special interest. As a capstone in Environmental Studies and Science, this course will examine assertions about modern environmentalism and capitalism from natural science, social science, and humanities perspectives. Following a review of key course concepts, we will explore differing ideas on the use or abuse of capitalism as a tool to address environmental problems and related ecological and social outcomes. Students will select case studies of interest that exemplify the opportunities and contradictions associated with efforts to address environmental and social concerns in an era of capitalism. For example, students could examine a range of issues that explore the commodification of nature and people including: payment for ecosystem services; carbon trading; royalty payments for resource extraction; economic valuation of human life; environmental health offsets; etc.. Student topics will frame the focal areas for course case studies, and will allow us to examine capitalism and environmentalism in practice.
1330:M   KAUF 178