Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 The American Sitcom
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-07 and FLST 210-03. From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American televisions most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcoms popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genres strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of public sphere in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.
1500:MR   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-02 Literature and Food
Instructor: Adrienne Su
Course Description:
In recent years, food has become a major topic of scholarly and creative inquiry. Its popularity has accompanied the rise of locavore eating, efforts to reform Big Food, and the vast market for cookbooks, cooking shows, and food memoirs. But literary characters have, for the most part, always had to eat and drink, and good literature knows no trends. This course will focus on the close reading of literary fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry with a focus on food. Among the likely authors: Margaret Atwood, Laurie Colwin, Isak Dinesen, M.F.K. Fisher, Robert Hass, Seamus Heaney, Jhumpa Lahiri, Yiyun Li, Upton Sinclair, Tracy K. Smith, Kevin Young. Students will write both analytical essays and creative responses.
1030:MWF   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-03 Jane Austen and Her World
Instructor: Leah Orr
Course Description:
In this course we will explore the literature, life, and times of Jane Austen. Our focal point will be her novels, but we will also read selections from her letters and literature from her contemporaries in the early nineteenth century. We will look at how her reputation has changed over time and the ways her works have been interpreted, continued, and reimagined in scholarship, literature, and film.
0830:MWF   EASTC 300
ENGL 101-04 Literature & Film of Southeast Asia: From Colony to Diaspora
Instructor: Rebekah Linh Collins
Course Description:
This introductory course will examine novels, short stories, memoirs, and feature and documentary films from contemporary Southeast Asia and the Anglophone Southeast Asian diaspora. The course will focus on countries in the region where British and American colonization and political intervention left cultural, linguistic, and other traces that can still be seen today. Students will be asked to consider what it means to be a postcolonial, diasporic writer of global English literature in the twenty-first century.
1030:TR   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-05 Early Science Fiction in the Magazines
Instructor: Patrick Belk
Course Description:
This course is designed to acquaint students with works of both mainstream and minority science-fiction writers from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Being a course in close reading and textual analysis, we will also be paying close attention to this genres forms, analyzing methods and techniques used by its authors, and applying what we learn toward writing critically and intelligently about them. Thus, the course is concerned not only with science fiction, and literary studies, but also with the abstract thinking and critical writing skills expected of college students regardless of major. To ground our discussion of early science fiction, we will focus on the study of various periodicals of that period, asking how the growth of SF magazines and magazine cultures in Britain, Europe, and the US helped to shape and define the broad cultural, historical, and aesthetic shifts that characterize SF as a literary genre. Adaptations from comic books, radio, and silent film will further enhance this exploration of the multiple channels and variety of media that first brought classic works of early science fiction to audiences of readers around the world.
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 106
ENGL 212-01 From Book to eBook: Writing About Media Change
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-04 and WRPG 211-01. Over the last two decades, traditional media forms, such as the book, the newspaper, and the film, have undergone significant change as new technologies altered both the business and the cultural spheres in which they are produced and consumed. At the same time, newer media forms, such as the video game, the search engine, and the social media site, have become prominent aspects of our media landscape. In this class we will examine the process of media change: Where do new media come from? How do old media change? And is there ever really a time when media arent changing?
1030:TR   EASTC 312
ENGL 212-02 Writing, Identity, & Queer Studies: In & Out, Either/Or, and Everything in Between
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-02. Kate Bornstein writes: "I know I'm not a man...and I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not a woman either. The trouble is, we're living in a world that insists we be one or the other." In this reading and writing intensive course, students will investigate how we approach the space outside of one or the other through literature, film, and narrative more generally. Throughout the semester we will explore and engage critically with established and emerging arguments in queer theory, as well as read and watch texts dealing with issues of identity and identification. Although queer is a contested term, it describesat least potentiallysexualities and genders that fall outside of normative constellations. Students will learn how to summarize and engage with arguments, and to craft and insert their own voice into the ongoing debates about the efficacy of queer theory and queer studies. Moreover, well take on questions that relate word to world in order to ask: How might our theory productively intervene in LGBTQ civil rights discourse outside our classroom? How do we define queer and is it necessarily attached to sexual orientation? How do our own histories and narratives intersect with the works we analyze? Our course texts will pull from a range of genres including graphic novels, film, poetry, memoir, and fiction. Some texts may include Alison Bechdels Fun Home, Audre Lordes Zami, Jackie Kay's Trumpet, David Sedaris _Me Talk Pretty One Day_, and films such as _Paris is Burning_ and _Boys Dont Cry_.
0900:TR   EASTC 406
ENGL 212-03 Writing About Nature
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-03. This course is designed to improve your skills as a writer of expository prose by emphasizing the genre of nature writing. We will concentrate on a variety of writing problems and techniques, emphasizing specific skills necessary to a wide range of writing tasks: description, summary, narration, argumentation, analysis, and interpretation. In all cases, our focus will be on the natural world and human connections to that world. Discussions of essay reading assignments will be supplemented by workshop sessions and individual tutorials. Students will have the opportunity to critique work by their classmates and to compare their own essays to works by nature writers of the past two centuries. The course aims to concentrate your attention on the precise stylistic details that lead to effective writing.
1500:MR   KAUF 178
ENGL 212-04 Writing about the Past/Writing about the Future
Instructor: Leah Orr
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-04. How do we imagine the future? How does our perspective in the present impact how we see the past? In this course, students will study different ways to write about the past and the future. Readings will include examples of historical and futuristic writing as well as alternate history and speculative fiction (sci-fi). Students will have the opportunity to write in a variety of formats, including memoirs, proposals, and interpretive essays.
0900:TR   EASTC 312
ENGL 212-05 Writing About the "Exotic": Colonialism, Postcolonialism, Diaspora and Globalization in Lit & Film
Instructor: Rebekah Linh Collins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-05. In this writing intensive course we will examine literature and films by Europeans and Americans who travel, in fact and fiction, to exotic destinations in Asia and the Caribbean. Alongside colonial narratives, we will read postcolonial writing by young authors of the global Anglophone diaspora who are radically transforming our understanding of English literature today. Works by Joseph Conrad, Zadie Smith, Marguerite Duras, Nam Le, Danny Boyle, Rattawut Lapcharoensap and others may be included. We will also read some classic and contemporary theoretical writing on colonialism and postcolonialism by Edward Said, Frantz Fanon, Aim Csaire, Albert Memmi, Paul Gilroy, Ania Loomba, Vilashini Cooppan, and possibly others. Students will write copiously and spend significant time revising and critiquing their and others writing.
1330:MR   EASTC 312
ENGL 214-01 Working with Writers: Theory and Practice
Instructor: Noreen Lape
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 214-01.Permission of Instructor Required.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 08
ENGL 215-01 Creative Writing: Memoir/Personal Essay
Instructor: Sharon O'Brien
Course Description:
A workshop on the writing of memoir and personal essay. Offered every two years.
1330:W   EASTC 107
ENGL 218-01 Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction
Instructor: Elise Levine, Rebekah Remington-Jonke
Course Description:
An introductory creative writing workshop in poetry and fiction.
1330:T   EASTC 102
1330:T   EASTC 107
ENGL 218-02 Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction
Instructor: Darrach Dolan, Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
An introductory creative writing workshop in poetry and fiction.
1330:W   EASTC 212
1330:W   EASTC 312
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1030:MWF   EASTC 406
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1230:MWF   EASTC 312
ENGL 220-03 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:MR   KAUF 187
ENGL 300-01 Literary Studies Research Lab
Instructor: Christine Bombaro
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course (except ENGL 339).
 
ENGL 338-01 The Craft of Poetry
Instructor: Adrienne Su
Course Description:
Looking mainly at modern and contemporary poetry, we will examine poems from the point of view of the apprentice poet, trying to figure out how the masters did it, and what, specifically, makes a poem succeed. To do so, we'll think about poems in the context in which they were written and the possibilities the poet could have chosen (but did not). There will be a research paper. Among the likely poets: W. H. Auden, Henri Cole, Alan Dugan, Robert Frost, Louise Glck, Robert Hayden, Seamus Heaney, Maxine Kumin, Philip Larkin, Sylvia Plath, W. B. Yeats.Prerequisite: 101
1330:MR   EASTC 301
ENGL 339-01 Sword and Sorcery
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
For roughly two decades beginning in the mid-1960s, the genre called sword and sorcery was responsible for some of the United States most popular mass-market fiction, comic books, childrens cartoons, and action-adventure films. By the mid-1990s, however, the genre had virtually disappeared from American popular media. In this class, we will examine the genres origins and the conditions that gave rise to both its popularity and eventual disappearance. We also query its legacy with respect to the broader fantasy genre of which it was a part. Texts will primarily consist of literary works, including novels and short stories by Lord Dusany, Rudyard Kipling, Robert E. Howard, C. L. Moore, J. R. R. Tolkein, and George R. R. Martin. Some time will also be devoted, however, to examining work in visual media.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 207
ENGL 339-02 The Gothic, 1764-1824
Instructor: Leah Orr
Course Description:
This course may count as either a pre-1800 or post-1800 300-level literature class, depending on the student's research. Those students who wish to earn pre-1800 credit must inform me before add/drop is over, and I will inform the Registrar and supplement and guide research accordingly. Students must satisfactorily complete the final research paper as a pre-1800 course to receive pre-1800 credit. In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, a new genre of fiction emerged called the Gothic that used elements like haunted castles, ancient manuscripts, secret histories, and mysterious portraits to expose the limits of power, fear, love, and death. In this course, we will read a variety of Gothic novels in order to understand the origins of the form and the ways that writers used fiction to explore questions of religion, social order, and the human psyche. This class will also consider the role of the Gothic genre in the eighteenth century as both a popular and a subversive literary movement. Authors may include Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Mary Shelley, and James Hogg.
1130:MWF   EASTC 301
ENGL 349-01 How the Great War Made America Modern
Instructor: K Wendy Moffat, Tami Biddle
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01, HIST 215-03 and POSC 290-01. This interdisciplinary course posits the entry of the United States into World War I as a pivotal moment in its becoming a modern society and a global political force. We will trace the emergence of the US government as a force in the lives of Americans; the emergence of the US as a great power, and as the owner of a sizable and increasingly powerful military establishment; and the effect of war trauma (particularly PTSD) in medicine and public policy. We will read widely (in policy, journalism, literature, government documents, personal accounts, war theory, history) to explore the following questions: What were the justifications for and debates about America entering a foreign war ? If you become a great power and create a large military full of people whom you then send off to war, how do you bring them home again? What do the burdens of this war experience look like and feel like to those who carry them? What do we do (or fail to do) as a nation to help people bear those burdens? How does the experience of America in World War I shape ideas about the role the US military should play in the world? How did America face (or avoid) reckoning with the cost (material and psychic) of the war?
1330:T   ALTHSE 201
ENGL 349-02 Problems of Belonging in Asian American Literature
Instructor: Rebekah Linh Collins
Course Description:
This course will examine Asian American literature in which implicit and formal arguments for adopting a cultural-nationalist position in the new land and literary landscape can be seen to be at odds with arguments for claiming a post- or transnational, cosmopolitan authorial and discursive identity or subject position. We will read works of fiction by Ha Jin, Gish Jen, Jhumpa Lahiri, Lan Samantha Chang, Le Thi Diem Thuy, Nam Le, Monique Truong, and Miguel Syjuco. In addition, we will study some now-classic and some more contemporary theoretical writing on postcolonialism, diaspora, transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, and global citizenship by Homi Bhabha, Pheng Cheah, Azade Seyhan, David Palumbo-Liu, Francoise Lionnet and Shu-mei Shih, among others. The course will pose challenging and complex questions on literary aesthetics and the nature of belonging in the twenty-first century.
0900:TR   EASTC 301
ENGL 350-01 Medieval Romance
Instructor: Thomas Reed
Course Description:
This course will trace the evolution of the literary romance throughout the Middle Ages. Among the works we'll likely consider are Beowulf, Marie de France's Lais, Chretien de Troyes' Arthurian romances, The Quest of the Holy Grail, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and various of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. As for method, we'll aim to hit a productive balance between contextual and inter-textual approaches.
1030:TR   EASTC 300
ENGL 354-01 English Literature, 1660-1798: Plagues, Petticoats, Poems & Plays
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Canonical authors and marginal voices of the long eighteenth century. Plagues, fires, invasions, fashion, theology, flirtation, lexicography, heavy drinking, slavery, rebellion, municipal sanitation, love. Pepys, Dryden, Behn, Addison, Pope, Swift, Pilkington, Johnson, Boswell, Piozzi, possibly early Austen.
0930:MWF   EASTC 300
ENGL 360-01 Victorian Sexualities
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-03.Often the Victorian era (1832-1901) is depicted as a period rigid in its attitudes toward morality, gender, and sexuality. However, nineteenth-century literature saw an array of dangerous people inhabit its pages: effeminate men, political women (also known as the New Woman), prostitutes, and hysterics to name a few. Victorians lived during a time of new emphasis on democracy and equality, scrutiny of marriage and property law, and, at times, openness to diversity in gender and sexuality. While our course will pay special attention to changing conceptions of the individual, sexuality, and gender, we also will look at the ways in which gender and sexuality intersect with race, class, nationality, and other social factors. This course is an upper-level seminar in Victorian literature of many genrespoetry, drama, the novel, and non-fiction prose by a variety of authors such as Lord Alfred Tennyson, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Meredith, Charles Dickens, Sigmund Freud, Michael Field, and Mona Caird.
0930:MWF   EASTC 301
ENGL 375-01 Contemporary African American Novels
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01. This course examines the intersectional politics of race, class, and gender that are expressed and problematized in twenty-first century African-American novels. Over the course of the semester, we will consider the ways in which these politics not only shape African-Americans individual and communal consciousness within the texts, but also how they inform the construction of the narrative proper. Moreover, we will discuss the historical, social, and political milieus of the novels in order to deepen our understandings of the Black experience in the United States. Our analyses will be based on selected works that range from historical narratives to science fiction and are composed by authors Toni Morrison, Victor LaValle, Bernice McFadden, Colson Whitehead, Tayari Jones, Daniel Black, as well as Tananarive Due.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 07
ENGL 389-01 Literature and Food
Instructor: Adrienne Su
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.
1030:MWF   EASTC 405
ENGL 399-01 Dante's Divine Comedy
Instructor: James McMenamin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 322-01.Additional meeting time for FLIC students only Monday 1:30-2:15pm in Bosler 313.
1500:TR   BOSLER 213
ENGL 404-01 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: K Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:W   EASTC 406
ENGL 404-02 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Thomas Reed
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:R   EASTC 406
ENGL 404-03 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:T   EASTC 406
ENGL 418-01 Mixed Genre Workshop
Instructor: Elise Levine
Course Description:
Capstone workshop for students minoring with an emphasis in poetry or fiction. Students will work in one genre of their choice. In exceptional cases, a student may work in both genres with permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: 101 and (317 or 319).
1330:M   EASTC 406
ENGL 500-01 Approaching 21st Century Problems With Humor
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
 
ENGL 500-02 Louisa May Alcott in Context
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
 
ENGL 500-03 Women and Memoir
Instructor: Sharon O'Brien
Course Description: