Fall 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 From Novel to Film
Instructor: Thomas Reed
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-02. This course cultivates rigorous skills of literary and filmic analysis. Looking at film "remakes" of novels will highlight the capabilities and limitations of the two media and the ways narratives reflect the specific values and concerns of their eras of creation. Possible "pairings": Silence of the Lambs; Black Robe; Dracula; Mary Reilly; Remains of the Day; and The English Patient.
1330:TF   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-03 The Epic: Gods, Devils, Monsters, and Men
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
An introduction to the epic as a genre and to the mythic stories that have shaped Western culture. Texts will likely include Homer's Iliad, Beowulf, Milton's Paradise Lost, and Wordsworth's The Prelude.
0930:MWF   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-04 American Nature Writing: Environment, Cultures, and Values
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 111-01. Perhaps no genre of literature is as uniquely American as American nature writing. No genre can tell us as much about our environment, environmental culture, and the values that derive from and depend upon our natural environment. We will also work to define "nature" and to understand the complex connections between humans and the nonhuman environment they inhabit. Our guides will be Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Terry Tempest Williams, Bill McKibben, and others. The course will be a study of metaphor, poetic and prose styles, and the link between literary and naturalistic observation. Our texts will be literary; our contexts will be environmental, cultural, and ethically ecological. Are humans a part of the natural environment? Do we see ourselves as distinct from nature? Is our environment beautiful and benign (sunsets, daffodils, puffins) or ugly and destructive (hurricanes, cancer, death)? We will examine the current importance (as well as the controversial aspects) of evolutionary ideas, and we will emphasize the role played by literature in the development of our own environmental assumptions and values. Two essays and a final exam.
1030:TR   KAUF 179
ENGL 101-06 The Vietnam War in Literature and Film
Instructor: Rebekah Collins
Course Description:
In this course we will read and view classic and contemporary works of literature and art about the Vietnam War. While the war was an international conflict, we will focus mainly on a diversity of Vietnamese and American perspectives. We will examine the various aesthetic strategies used by writers, filmmakers, and visual artists to represent the wartime and postwar experiences of combatants and civilians, participants and witnesses, and the ongoing effects of war for many in Vit Nam, America, and elsewhere. Some of the larger questions we will pose include when does (this) war begin? When does it end, if ever? For whom? Why and how might this last question, in particular, be important to our understanding of war in a foreign land? Writers/filmmakers may include: Tim OBrien, Bo Ninh, Philip Caputo, Duong Van Mai Elliott, Hong-An Truong, and Doan Hoang.
1330:MR   EASTC 405
ENGL 212-03 Writing in and for Digital Environments
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-03. In this course, students will think about the stakes of writing in a range of digital environmentsblogs, online forums, personal collections (pinterest, tumblr, twitter, facebook, etc), as well as the politics and history of publishing, copyright, and the public domain. In addition, students will examine archives and the responsibility of holdings within a library or other institution. Finally, students will learn the technical skills to create a class website as they consider writing across different environments.
1030:TR   EASTC 312
ENGL 212-04 Writing About Nature
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-04. This course is designed to improve your skills as a writer of expository prose by emphasizing the genre of nature writing. We will concentrate on a variety of writing problems and techniques, emphasizing specific skills necessary to a wide range of writing tasks: description, summary, narration, argumentation, analysis, and interpretation. In all cases, our focus will be on the natural world and human connections to that world. Discussions of essay reading assignments will be supplemented by workshop sessions and individual tutorials. Students will have the opportunity to critique work by their classmates and to compare their own essays to works by nature writers of the past two centuries. The course aims to concentrate your attention on the precise stylistic details that lead to effective writing.
1500:MR   TOME 227
ENGL 215-01 Memoir or Creative Non-Fiction
Instructor: Rebekah Collins
Course Description:
A workshop on the writing of memoir and personal essay. Offered every two years.
0900:TR   EASTC 406
ENGL 218-01 Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction
Instructor: Adrienne Su, Elise Levine
Course Description:
An introductory creative writing workshop in poetry and fiction.
1330:MR   EASTC 212
1330:MR   EASTC 312
ENGL 218-02 Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction
Instructor: Darrach Dolan, Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
An introductory creative writing workshop in poetry and fiction.
1330:W   EASTC 301
ENGL 220-01 Critical Approaches and Literary Methods
Instructor: Thomas Reed
Course Description:
An introduction to the basic questions that one may ask about a literary text, its author, and its audience. Study of a limited selection of literary texts using several critical approaches. The course will also offer instruction in the elements of critical writing.
1030:MWF   EASTC 406
ENGL 220-02 Critical Approaches and Literary Methods
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-03.
1030:TR   STERN 103
ENGL 220-03 Critical Approaches and Literary Methods
Instructor: Leah Orr
Course Description:
An introduction to the basic questions that one may ask about a literary text, its author, and its audience. Study of a limited selection of literary texts using several critical approaches. The course will also offer instruction in the elements of critical writing.
1330:MR   EASTC 102
ENGL 300-01 Critical Approaches and Literary Methods (C.A.L.M.) Lab
Instructor: Elizabeth Ferer, Leah Orr
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course (except ENGL 339).
 
ENGL 317-01 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
Instructor: Elise Levine
Course Description:
Writing and discussion of fiction. Prerequisite: 218 or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   EASTC 102
ENGL 319-01 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
Instructor: Adrienne Su
Course Description:
Writing and discussion of poetry. Prerequisite: 218 or permission of the instructor.
1330:T   EASTC 312
ENGL 335-01 American Auteurs
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-03 and FLST 310-04. Auteurs are usually defined as filmmakers whose individual styles and extraordinary control over the elements of production allow them to create unique films that reflect their own personalities and artistic preoccupations. In this class we will examine the work of four contemporary American directors who are usually identified as auteurs: David Lynch, Gregg Araki, Sophia Coppola, Spike Lee, and Christopher Nolan. Through examinations of their films and through readings on film authorship and culture in the United States, we will explore what it means both to be an auteur in general and to be an auteur in twenty-first-century America.
1500:TF   EASTC 405
ENGL 337-01 The Craft of Fiction
Instructor: Elise Levine
Course Description:
This course will closely examine the tools, materials, and specific techniques used to create successful short stories and discuss The Masters as craftsmen (and craftswomen) in their trade. We'll begin with Chekhov and end with contemporaries such as Tobias Wolfe and Lorrie Moore. On the way we'll discuss the likes of Joyce, Fitzgerald, O'Connor, Cheever, and Carver.Prerequisite: 101
1130:MWF   STERN 103
ENGL 359-01 Inventing America: Trans-Atlantic Literature of the 18th Century
Instructor: Leah Orr
Course Description:
This course will focus on works by writers from both sides of the Atlantic to examine the ways in which they used literature to grapple with the changing relationship between Britain and America and the formation of a new type of nation. We will also examine literature that explores problematic issues such as slavery, relations between colonists and native Americans, and the role of women in the new society. Authors studied may include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Benjamin Franklin, Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, Samson Occam, Charles Brockden Brown, and James Fenimore Cooper.
1030:TR   EASTC 301
ENGL 364-01 James Joyce's Ulysses
Instructor: K Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Now you can tell your grandchildren that you have read, finished, and (partially) understood the Great Modern Novel almost every serious reader has picked up and attempted. The text of Ulysses (1922) is the linchpin for intertextual explorations; we will read Ulysses slowly, throughout the whole term. In addition, we will read around the novel, considering alternative contexts for understanding this complex, yet wonderful work. Other readings will include versions of Joyce's autobiography (A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Stephen Hero), biography (Richard Ellman and Edna O'Brien on Joyce and Brenda Maddox on Nora Barnacle, Joyce's lover and wife), Joyce's fiction (The Dubliners), the mythic context (The Odyssey, The Bible, Celtic myth), and Irish social history. A presentation, annotated bibliography, short research paper, and final exam.
0930:MWF   EASTC 300
ENGL 370-01 The Political Novel
Instructor: Sharon O'Brien
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01. This course will explore the politics of narrative: the ways in which stories both those created by individual authors and cultural scripts relate to structures of power. How do narratives by American writers, ranging from the late 19th century to the present day, challenge dominant social institutions, representations, and ideologies or reinforce them? We will be particularly interested in structures of gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality. We will explore the ways in which American writers give voice to silenced stories and re-vision the past so as to give us a more complex history. Important to our course is the issue of the personal and social impact of literature upon readers: what can stories do? At the same time, we will concern ourselves with aesthetic questions and authorial intentions, asking whether aesthetic goals can be compatible with political ones. We will be reading such texts as Upton Sinclair, The Jungle, Kate Chopin, The Awakening, F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Toni Morrison, Beloved, E. L. Doctorow, Ragtime, Louise Erdrich, The Roundhouse and seeing such movies as Thelma and Louise and Twelve Years a Slave.
1330:MR   EASTC 300
ENGL 392-01 Shakespearean Genres
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
We will read a wide selection of Shakespeare's plays and poems, paying particular attention to how he masters the genres of comedy, tragedy, history, and romance, as well as writing plays that trouble or transcend generic boundaries. We will deepen our understanding of Shakespeare's context by reading individual plays by major contemporaries: Marlowe, Middleton, and Jonson.
0900:TR   EASTC 300
ENGL 396-01 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and WGST 300-02. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical approaches as psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, and new historicism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
ENGL 399-01 Robert Frost & Modern American Poetry
Instructor: Siobhan Phillips
Course Description:
In an age obsessed with novelty, Robert Frost recommended the old-fashioned way to be new. This course will use Frosts varied career to explore what modern means for poetry and poetry scholarship and how the contradictory legacy of "American" literature intersects with that modernity. We will move through questions of philosophy, politics, gender, poetic form, and material publication. We will read Frosts work among others, including writing by Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, and Ezra Pound, in order to relate Frosts work to relevant cultural and theoretical contexts.
1330:TF   EASTC 301
ENGL 403-01 The Great War Imagined
Instructor: K Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Even at the time was being fought, the First World War (1914-1918) was represented as a "gap in history," a cataclysmic shift in European consciousness as well as a corporal event. We will foreground two principal ways of knowing the war in our interdisciplinary inquiry. One focus will be on the experience of living in a security state, the feeling of neverending war, the gaps in consciousness among men and women, combatants and civilians on the "home front." A second will be on visual representations-especially painting, film, the little magazines, and monuments. We will read memoir (Brittain, Wyndham Lewis), poetry (Sassoon, Owen, Rosenberg) , war policy documents, trial transcripts (Pemberton Billing), fiction ( Woolf, Barker) and film (Tavernier, MacKinnon). Oral reports, short argument papers, research project. No final exam.
1330:W   EASTC 406
ENGL 403-02 Adapting the Novel
Instructor: Thomas Reed
Course Description:
Why and how do writers and film-makers adjust their vision and creativity to re-work pre-existing narratives? We will consider a range of adaptations or revisions of selected novels, some of them classics and some of them of a more "popular" nature. Literary re-tellings may include J. M. Coetzee's version of Robinson Crusoe, Joyce Carol Oates' re-working of The Turn of the Screw, or Valerie Martin's 1990 "Jekyll and Hyde." Films may include Apocalypse Now, Fight Club, Atonement, True Grit, or The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. The class will stress active and rigorous discussion based on close formal analysis and reasonable contextual understanding of the texts in question.
1330:R   EASTC 406
ENGL 403-03 Literature and Money
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.In this seminar we will connect the topics of literature and money through three interrelated approaches. First, we will read literature about money: texts that take money and economics as their central themes. Second, we will read literature as money, exploring the ways that terms like "credit," "value," "character," "counterfeit," and "interest" reveal historical and structural links between the literary and the monetary. Finally, we will think about how authors and others exchange literature for money, looking at the history of intellectual property from the invention of copyright to online file sharing; the roles of patronage, print, and the academy in literary livelihoods; and the tension between authenticity and commercialism in literary reputation. Primary text authors may include Shakespeare, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Johnson, Adam Smith, Goethe, Henry James, and Ezra Pound; we will engage with recent critical work by Pierre Bourdieu, Marc Shell, James English, Mary Poovey, Deidre Lynch, and others.
1330:T   EASTC 406
ENGL 500-01 Advanced Study in Creative Writing: International Magical Realism
Instructor: Elise Levine
Course Description:
 
ENGL 500-02 Anglo-American Comic Auteurs
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description: