Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 Speculative Fiction in African American Literature
Instructor: James Harris
Course Description:
Speculative fiction names a mode of world-making that is not constrained by the logic of possibility, insisting always on asking what if? What if King Arthur was the leader of an inner-city gang? What if nuclear warfare made the planet uninhabitable? What if magic was real? In this course, we will explore the imaginative worlds envisioned by 20th and 21st-century African American authors to ask what kinds of alternative pasts, presents, and futures they create, and what lessons those possibilities might hold. Our healthy mixture of novels and short stories may include works by Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany, Ishmael Reed, Lorraine Hansberry, Nalo Hopkinson, NK Jemisin, Walter Mosley, and Maurice Broaddus.
0930:MWF   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-02 History of Television from Broadcast to the Digital Era
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-07. This course examines the history of television from the Broadcast Era of the 1950s to the Digital Era of connected viewing. The course gives special attention to how television functions as a cultural forum for American society, and addresses historical shifts in media industries, government regulation, and representational practices. Selected texts may include: Marty, I Love Lucy, The Honeymooners, Amos n Andy, The Twilight Zone, Bewitched, All in the Family, Hill Street Blues, Thirtysomething, Twin Peaks, Seinfeld, Will & Grace, The Wire, Mad Men, Girls, and Glow.
1230:MWF   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-03 The Legend of King Arthur: From Medieval to Monty Python
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
The legend of King Arthur has captured imaginations for hundreds of years, inspiring adaptations even into the present day. Yet when the legend originated a millennium ago, it was already considered a tale of a bygone age, the dream of a romantic past. This class will study the medieval origins of the King Arthur story and then trace that legend through time to the present day, including the films King Arthur and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. As we read, we will consider how each text responds to both its historical context and its own imagined past.
1030:MWF   DENNY 313
ENGL 101-04 Jane Austen in Her Time
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-02.We will read all the major novels of Jane Austen in the context of biography and social history. Not open to students who have taken English 399 of the same title.
0900:TR   EASTC 301
ENGL 101-05 U.S. Women Writers
Instructor: Donna Bickford
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-01. It starts when you care to act, Marge Piercy writes in her poem The Low Road. What kinds of actions are of interest to contemporary US women writers? Well read and analyze novels, short stories, and poetry, with particular attention to thematic issues and socio-historical context. Topics we might explore include the construction of the female body, sexuality and desire, motherhood, exile and immigration, work, creative production, social activism, etc. In addition, well be thinking about multiple and intersecting identities.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
ENGL 101-06 Introduction to Native American Literature
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-02. This course introduces students to novels, plays, poetry and short fiction authored by writers from North American Native nations, primarily those located within the boundaries of the US and Canada. As one of the goals of any class in non-Western literature(s) is to better understand cultural diversity in general, and the culture(s) being studied, in particular, this course will provide students with a brief overview of the culture and history of the nations the authors are from. In addition to contemporary literature, we will study select Native oral traditions such as, traditional teachings about creation, migration, tricksters and monster-like sacred beings to illustrate the ways in oral literature not only influences but is the basis for contemporary Native North American written literature(s). This course also will explore the relevance of issues like sovereignty, nationhood, resurgence and decolonization if these issues are appropriate to the historical context of the literature we read. In the process, this course will not only help develop students critical reading, analysis and writing skills, but also, will help them understand the importance of cultural self-representation and identity construction through literature. For as Creek literary theorist Craig Womack argues: Native literature, and Native literary criticism, written by Native authors, is a part of sovereignty: Indian people exercising the right to present pictures of themselves and to discuss those images. . . Tribes recognizing their own extant literatures, writing new ones and asserting the right to explicate them constitutes a move toward nationhood.
1230:MWF   DENNY 212
ENGL 214-01 Working with Writers: Theory and Practice
Instructor: Noreen Lape
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 214-01.Permission of Instructor Required.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
0900:TR   EASTC 107
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-09. In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1330:MR   EASTC 107
ENGL 220-03 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English.
1030:TR   EASTC 301
ENGL 221-01 Multiculturalism: Race, Rhetoric, and Writing
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-01. Multiculturalism is often celebrated as the ideal approach to managing racial, cultural, and religious differences within society. However, this concept has also been critiqued for the ways in which it masks systemic inequalities and deep-seated prejudices. Focusing on questions of race, power, and privilege, this course will examine narratives of multiculturalism in North America, Europe, and Southeast Asia. Over the course of the semester, students will read and respond to a diverse range of sources including: poetry, fiction, scholarly essays, advertising campaigns, political speeches, and national laws. In addition to engaging these texts and contexts through ongoing class discussions and debates, students will also produce formal and creative essays, opinion pieces, and an interdisciplinary research project. This course aims to help students strengthen their analytical writing, critical thinking, and close reading skills, thereby enabling them to understand and critique how multiculturalism has shaped the lived experiences of communities around the world.
0900:TR   EASTC 312
ENGL 221-02 Digital Media, Society, and Culture
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-08 and WRPG 211-02.
0930:MWF   EASTC 312
ENGL 222-01 Introduction to Game Studies
Instructor: James Harris
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-09. Bridging the worlds of folklore, political science, narrative theory, design philosophy, and critical media studies, the nascent field of game studies offers a broad range of approaches and methodologies in service of answering the question: what can play teach us about ourselves? This course takes play seriously. We will begin by establishing a foundation for thinking critically about games and play before engaging with some fascinating examples of the possibilities (and pitfalls) of interactive entertainment. Readings may include theorists such as Johan Huizinga, Roger Caillois, Ian Bogost, Katherine Isbister, Patrick Jagoda, Janet Murray, Lisa Nakamura, Edmond Chang, and Adrienne Shaw. Possible games include Super Mario World, Call of Duty: Black Ops, Mafia 3, Cards Against Humanity, Secret Hitler, Papers Please, and Exploding Kittens. Students will complete two mid-terms covering key terms and concepts and a final group project in which they design and produce a game of their own for our end-of-semester Games Showcase. NOTE: You do not need to be proficient in gaming or design to take this course. As an entry-level course, students of all levels of comfort or familiarity should feel welcome to engage.
1130:MWF   EASTC 300
ENGL 222-02 African American Influences in U.S. Afro-Latino Literature
Instructor: Trent Masiki
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. This course examines African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes in U.S. Afro-Latino memoirs and autobiographical fiction. The course highlights Afro-Latino agency, resistance, endurance, intertextuality, and interracial alliances. Students will learn about the relationships between transculturation, panethnicity and ethnoracial identity formation in the U.S.
1030:TR   DANA 202
ENGL 222-03 American Indians in Film and Media
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-04 and FLST 310-05.Students should be prepared for a weekly 2 1/2 hour film lab, day and time to be determined during the first week of class. From its earliest days, film has been an important medium of storytelling. Film also has been used to appropriate and manipulate the images of people, places and events. In particular, film as story has been used by both non-Native and Native directors and producers to capture images of Native peoples, and to construct or to represent their identities and lived realities in particular ways. For a brief moment during the Silent Film era, American Indians were able to control some of the stories told about them through film, thereby controlling the way film constructed their identities, their lived realities. From the close of the Silent Film era until the 1990s, Hollywood controlled the representation of Native Americans in film, effectively colonizing their identities. In recent decades, however, Native film producers, directors, screen writers, actors and actresses have been using film to present images and stories that more accurately reflect their own contemporary lived realities and identities. In so doing, they are decolonizing filmic representations of them. This course surveys two important topics with regards to the representation of Native North Americans in Film, TV and social media. The first topic is the colonization of Native identities and lived realities via cinematic imaging and redfacing. The second explores how contemporary Native North American film makers engage in visual sovereignty to tell their stories in a way that challenges and decolonizes U.S. and Canadian representations of Native North American peoples.
0930:MWF   DENNY 212
ENGL 222-04 The Literature of Money
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-07. The 2007 crisis is thought to have laid to rest widespread assumptions about the ceaseless abundance of financial markets. This faith, it has been argued, is built on fantasies of infinitely compounding abstractions that wager on hypothetical futures and turbulent risk. Fantasies, futures, and abstractions also describe the cultural function of literary texts. This course will examine not only how American literature represents practices like speculation and efforts to monetize risk, but also investigate literature and finance's common practice of producing fictions through an analysis of narrative: novels, film, and other forms of storytelling. Class will begin by examining 19th century novels about land and commodity speculation, but the majority of class will be devoted to literature composed in or about the 1980s and 90s, when financial capitalism is thought to have hit its apex. Fulfills AMST Representation or AMST Structures and Institutions. Cannot fulfill both.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 07
ENGL 222-05 Murakami, Manga and More: Contemporary Japanese Literature
Instructor: Peter Bates
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 203-01.Murakami Haruki is one of the worlds most popular literary authors, and is regularly given high odds to win the Nobel Prize in literature. His success, along with the spread of Japanese popular culture in the form of manga and anime, has led to many recent works of Japanese fiction being available in translation. This course critically examines short stories, manga, and novels by many different contemporary authors and creators alongside theories of translation and gender. One author we will be reading deserves special attention: Tawada Yko, a world-famous author, who will be visiting campus in March.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 109
ENGL 300-01 Literary Studies Research Lab
Instructor: Christine Bombaro
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course (except ENGL 337-338).
 
ENGL 321-01 Mapping the Global Middle Ages
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak
Course Description:
From England to Jerusalem, Morocco to Rome, Ireland to India, the medieval traveler encountered and came to terms with varieties of cultures, religions, and races. The maps and written records of these travelers, both imagined and real, inspired the imaginations of their contemporaries and helped shape larger cultural narratives about nationalism, religion, and personal identity. This course will examine medieval maps and travel narratives from 1000-1500 CE in order to better understand the diverse cultural work performed by reports of encounters with other cultures. How did these travel narratives strengthen or question faith, critique or support nationalism, and establish or sustain gendered and racial identities?
1500:MR   EASTC 301
ENGL 321-02 Literature of Migration & Displacement
Instructor: Sheela Jane Menon
Course Description:
Students who took ENGL 381 "Literature of The Global South" in Spring 2017 with Professor Menon may NOT take this class due to content overlap. This course examines contemporary literature that has emerged from complex histories of displacement, migration, war, and exile, and analyzes how these histories continue to shape texts and communities around the world. We will focus on 21st century literature that spans the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, Palestine, Syria, Ghana, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Our readings will include: Tash Aws The Face: Strangers on a Pier (2015), Viet Thanh Nguyens The Sympathizer (2016); Taiye Selasis Ghana Must Go (2013); the letters of Sayed Kashua and Etgar Keret (2014); short stories from Mia Alvars In the Country (2015) and Susan Muaddi Darrajs, The Inheritance of Exile (2007); and excerpts from Syria Speaks: Art and Culture from the Frontline (2014), edited by Malu Halasa, Zaher Omareen, and Nawara Mahfoud. Guided by Postcolonial and Cultural Studies methodologies, we will examine how race, class, gender, and politics influence the movements of people across the globe.
1030:TR   EASTC 300
ENGL 321-03 Studies in US LGBTQ History and Literature
Instructor: Katherine Schweighofer, Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01 and WGSS 301-03. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) literature and culture in the United States. Co-taught by professors in Womens Gender and Sexuality Studies and English, the course moves among literary, historical, and theoretical texts to address questions of sex, gender, and sexuality as they shape queer American identities, communities, and cultures. Drawing from queer theory, feminist and queer historicism, and feminist and queer literary analysis, students will consider the impact of sexuality and gender on literature and culture. We will pay particular attention to how sex and gender intersect with other forms of difference, including race, class, geography, and nationality. Primary readings will be drawn from a range of literary genres and archival sources.
1330:TF   EASTC 405
ENGL 321-04 Coming of Age in US Ethnic Literature
Instructor: James Harris
Course Description:
How do issues of race, gender, and sexuality impact the way authors describe the experience of coming of age? In this course, we will explore the coming of age narrative as fertile terrain for challenging assumptions about innocence, knowledge, growth and development throughout the twentieth century. From the gritty to the fantastical, we will seek to understand what the coming of age narrative in its myriad forms reveals about the experience of difference in the American project. At the same time, we will ask if there is something universal (or dare we suggest equalizing) in the awkward discomfort of adolescence that explains the persistent appeal of the form. Possible readings include: James Baldwin (Go Tell It on the Mountain) Richard Rodriguez (Hunger of Memory), Rigoberto Gonzalez (Butterfly Boy), Sara Schulman (The Child), Chang-Rae Lee (Native Speaker), Felicia Luna Lemus (Trace Elements of Random Tea Parties), and Octavia Butler (Adulthood Rites).
1230:MWF   EASTC 300
ENGL 341-01 Shakespeare: Politics/Culture
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
We will read seven plays representing Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories: Much Ado About Nothing, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Measure for Measure, MacBeth, Lear, and The Tempest. We will also view and discuss films of several of these plays by such directors as Branaugh, Casson, Greenaway, Kurosawa, and Noble. The secondary - theoretical - reading for the course will primarily draw upon New Historicist and Cultural Materialist criticism, first practiced in the US by Stephen Greenblatt in his Renaissance Self-Fashioning (1980). Where appropriate, we will also consider contextual and feminist issues. Assignments will include an in-class performance of a scene from one of the plays, a mid-term, a brief close reading essay, and a final research paper.
0900:TR   EASTC 405
ENGL 351-01 Independent American Cinema
Instructor: Steven Malcic
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 310-06.A core of American cinema has historically defined itself as independent from the Hollywood studio system. While many filmmakers identify as independent because they do not rely on outside funding, others identify their independence in terms of a style of filmmaking. In this course, we will examine different forms of independent cinema from the 1950s to the present day, attending to how changing structures in the film industry influenced competing ideologies of cinematic independence. Filmmakers may include: Andy Warhol, John Cassavetes, George A. Romero, Dennis Hopper, Melvin Van Peebles, John Waters, Martin Scorcese, David Lynch, Errol Morris, Lizzie Borden, Richard Linklater, Quentin Tarantino, Harmony Korine, Greta Girwig, Karyn Kusama, Sean Baker, and Barry Jenkins.
1030:MWF   BOSLER 208
ENGL 351-02 Dante's Divine Comedy
Instructor: James McMenamin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 322-01. This topics course is on Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy. Although a special focus will be placed on the Inferno, which will be read in its entirety, various cantos from Purgatorio and Paradiso will also be studied. Aiding the students along their journey through Hell and beyond will be critical readings that consider the historical, social, cultural and literary context of the period. The poem will be read in English translation. Italian Studies majors, Italian minors and INBM majors using this course to satisfy major/minor requirements will attend a discussion group in Italian and will write their papers in Italian. Upon successful completion of the work in Italian, students will receive a FLIC: Italian notation on their transcript.
1500:TR   BOSLER 313
ENGL 404-01 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:M   EASTC 406
ENGL 404-02 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:W   EASTC 406
ENGL 404-03 Senior Thesis Workshop
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
A workshop requiring students to share discoveries and problems as they produce a lengthy manuscript based on a topic of their own choosing, subject to the approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: 300 and 403.
1330:R   EASTC 406