Fall 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-01 Women Write War
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 101-01.This course reads American womens poetry written about the US Civil War, World War II, and the post-9/11 war on terror. What poetic forms have poets adopted or developed to address national and global conflicts? How do poets figure the metaphorical wars of sex and gender that are often implicated in those conflicts? How has US womens war poetry changed from the 1860s to the presentand why? Poets include Dickinson, Harper, Levertov, Mikhail, Nye, Rankine, Spahr, and Trethewey.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 08
ENGL 101-02 The Once and Future King: The Legend of King Arthur
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak, K Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
The legend of King Arthur has captured imaginations for hundreds of years, inspiring adaptations even into the present day. Yet when the legend originated over 800 years ago, it was already considered a tale of a bygone age, the dream of a romantic past. This class will read the medieval origins of the King Arthur story and then trace that legend to the present day, always considering how each text responds to both its own historical context and its imagined past.
1030:MWF   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-03 American Nature Writing: Environment, Cultures, and Values
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 111-01.Perhaps no genre of literature is as uniquely American as American nature writing. No genre can tell us as much about our environment, environmental culture, and the values that derive from and depend upon our natural environment. We will also work to define "nature" and to understand the complex connections between humans and the nonhuman environment they inhabit. Our guides will be Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard, Terry Tempest Williams, Bill McKibben, and others. The course will be a study of metaphor, poetic and prose styles, and the link between literary and naturalistic observation. Our texts will be literary; our contexts will be environmental, cultural, and ethically ecological. Are humans a part of the natural environment? Do we see ourselves as distinct from nature? Is our environment beautiful and benign (sunsets, daffodils, puffins) or ugly and destructive (hurricanes, cancer, death)? We will examine the current importance (as well as the controversial aspects) of evolutionary ideas, and we will emphasize the role played by literature in the development of our own environmental assumptions and values. Two essays and a final exam.
1330:MR   TOME 115
ENGL 101-04 The American Sitcom
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-05 and FLST 210-02.From the 1950s until very recently, the sitcom or situation comedy has been one of American televisions most popular and emblematic genres. Network lineups have been determined by it, household rhythms organized around it, and legal and financial battles fought over its content. In large part, the sitcoms popular significance and financial success have stemmed from its unique approach to the representation of social, economic, and political change. Both the genres strict stylistic conventions and its comedic approach to storytelling have allowed it to function as an unusual kind of public sphere in which contemporary debates about race, class, gender, and sexuality are represented through visual and narrative forms. In this course we will examine the sitcom from institutional, aesthetic, and historical perspectives so as to understand its role in the negotiation of cultural change.
1500:TF   EASTC 405
ENGL 101-06 Contemporary British Fiction
Instructor: Susan Perabo
Course Description:
This class will explore the the various elements that have characterized British novels and short stories in recent decades. Authors may include Anthony Burgess, Graham Swift, Martin Amis, Pat Barker, Angela Carter, Ian McEwan, Emma Healey, and Kazuo Ishiguro.
0930:MWF   DENNY 211
ENGL 101-09 Early Science Fiction in the Magazines
Instructor: Patrick Belk
Course Description:
This course is designed to acquaint students with works of both mainstream and minority science-fiction writers from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Being a course in close reading and textual analysis, we will also be paying close attention to this genres forms, analyzing methods and techniques used by its authors, and applying what we learn toward writing critically and intelligently about them. Thus, the course is concerned not only with science fiction, and literary studies, but also with the abstract thinking and critical writing skills expected of college students regardless of major. To ground our discussion of early science fiction, we will focus on the study of various periodicals of that period, asking how the growth of SF magazines and magazine cultures in Britain, Europe, and the US helped to shape and define the broad cultural, historical, and aesthetic shifts that characterize SF as a literary genre. Adaptations from comic books, radio, and silent film will further enhance this exploration of the multiple channels and variety of media that first brought classic works of early science fiction to audiences of readers around the world.
0830:MWF   STERN 11
ENGL 101-10 Literature and Food
Instructor: Adrienne Su
Course Description:
In recent years, food has become a major topic of scholarly and creative inquiry. Its popularity has accompanied the rise of locavore eating, efforts to reform Big Food, and the vast market for cookbooks, cooking shows, and food memoirs. But literary characters have, for the most part, always had to eat and drink, and good literature knows no trends. This course will focus on the close reading of literary fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry with a focus on food. Among the likely authors: Margaret Atwood, Laurie Colwin, Isak Dinesen, M.F.K. Fisher, Robert Hass, Seamus Heaney, Jhumpa Lahiri, Yiyun Li, Upton Sinclair, Tracy K. Smith, Kevin Young. Students will write both analytical essays and creative responses.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 08
ENGL 101-11 All in the Family
Instructor: Sha'an Chilson
Course Description:
Do we all grow up believing that there is something specific that a family should be? That there is an ideal family that we can and should live in? Where do we get these ideas, and how do they shape the world we live in? And what happens when we don't live in the ideal family? It is worth noting that novels, stories, and plays are filled with families that are in conflict within themselves and within the world they inhabit. In this course we will consider the ways that society shapes the family, as well as how experience of family life shapes an individual's sense of him/her self. We will read works of fiction, non-fiction, and drama that look at the lives of families in different areas of the country, from the 60's to the present, and that come from very different circumstances. Families are built on foundations of class, race, religion, sexual identity, and cultural heritage. In this class we will look at the expression of these issues in families and consider the differences between our ideas of what families should be and our experience of what they are. This class will also focus on our own writing as a process as students draft, rewrite, workshop, conference, and submit finished papers.
0900:TR   EASTC 300
ENGL 212-01 Writing in and for Digital Environments
Instructor: Sarah Kersh
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WRPG 211-01.In this course, students will think about the stakes of writing in a range of digital environmentsblogs, online forums, personal collections (pinterest, tumblr, twitter, facebook, etc), as well as the politics and history of publishing, copyright, and the public domain. In addition, students will examine archives and the responsibility of holdings within a library or other institution. Finally, students will learn the technical skills to create a class website as they consider writing across different environments.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
ENGL 218-01 Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction
Instructor: Adrienne Su, Susan Perabo
Course Description:
An introductory creative writing workshop in poetry and fiction.
1030:TR   EASTC 107
1030:TR   EASTC 406
ENGL 218-02 Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction
Instructor: Elise Levine
Course Description:
An introductory creative writing workshop in poetry and fiction.
1330:MR   EASTC 102
ENGL 219-01 Creative Writing: Memoir/Essay
Instructor: Sharon O'Brien
Course Description:
May include memoir, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, biography, novel writing, graphic novel, playwriting, genre fiction (e.g., detective, sci-fi), subgenres of poetry (e.g., visual poetry), subgenres of fiction (e.g., Magical Realism), and other forms of non-analytical writing not routinely offered.
1330:W   EASTC 107
ENGL 219-02 Screenwriting
Instructor: FLST STAFF, Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 310-01.This course will familiarize students with the fundamentals of good screenwriting: structure, theme, conflict, character, and dialogue. Students take part in weekly writing exercises as preparation for their final class project--creating a detailing outline of an original screenplay, and completing the first act. Topics include plot and subplot, character development, and commercial considerations such as format and genre. Students are required to read essential books on scriptwriting and to analyze several films and the screenplays on which they are based.
1330:M   EASTC 107
ENGL 220-01 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston, K Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. This course fulfills the WID graduation requirement.
1030:MWF   EASTC 406
ENGL 220-02 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Jacob Sider Jost
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. This course fulfills the WID graduation requirement.
0930:MWF   EASTC 406
ENGL 220-03 Introduction to Literary Studies
Instructor: Rebekah Linh Collins
Course Description:
In literary studies, we explore the work texts do in the world. This course examines several texts of different kinds (e.g., novel, poetry, film, comic book, play, etc.) to investigate how literary forms create meanings. It also puts texts in conversation with several of the critical theories and methodologies that shape the discipline of literary study today (e.g., Marxist theory, new historicism, formalism, gender theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, etc.). This course helps students frame interpretive questions and develop their own critical practice. This course is the prerequisite for 300-level work in English. This course fulfills the WID graduation requirement.
1330:MR   EASTC 301
ENGL 300-01 Literary Studies Research Lab
Instructor: Christine Bombaro
Course Description:
This P/F non-credit research course introduces students to research methodology for advanced literary studies. ENGL 300 is a co-requisite with a student's first 300-level literature course (except ENGL 339).
 
ENGL 317-01 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
Instructor: Susan Perabo
Course Description:
Writing and discussion of fiction. Prerequisite: 218 or permission of the instructor.
1330:M   EASTC 406
ENGL 319-01 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
Instructor: Adrienne Su
Course Description:
Writing and discussion of poetry. Prerequisite: 218 or permission of the instructor.
1330:M   EASTC 312
ENGL 329-01 Ecocriticism
Instructor: B Ashton Nichols
Course Description:
Ecocriticism is a recent form of literary and cultural interpretation that has emerged out of emphasis on the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Ecocritics emphasize the role played by nonhuman nature in a wide range of texts, literary and otherwise. They also interrogate the ways that human interactions with nature (plants, animals, geology, landscapes) have affected human life and the natural world. Many ecocritics have environmentalist or preservationist agendas; others are more interested in the philosophical and cultural implications of human understanding of and impact on the natural environment. We will set literary works in dialogue with scientists and nature writers of the past two centuries and will examine the current importance (as well as the controversial aspects) of ecocritical ideas. We will emphasize the role played by literature in the development of our own assumptions and values. The course will also focus attention on critical approaches and literary methods and will help students to develop more sophisticated research skills as they move toward the senior seminar year.
0900:TR   TOME 115
ENGL 337-01 The Craft of Fiction
Instructor: Elise Levine
Course Description:
This course will closely examine the tools, materials, and specific techniques used to create successful short stories and discuss The Masters as craftsmen (and craftswomen) in their trade. We'll begin with Chekhov and end with contemporaries such as Tobias Wolfe and Lorrie Moore. On the way we'll discuss the likes of Joyce, Fitzgerald, O'Connor, Cheever, and Carver.Prerequisite: 101
1130:MWF   DENNY 104
ENGL 349-02 War, Race & American Literature Since World War II
Instructor: Claire Seiler
Course Description:
This course studies the inextricable literatures of race and war in the United States since 1945. We will attend equally to how literary forms and critical theories of race and the racial break bear on writing about World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the post-9/11 war on terror. Writers will include Hersey, Inada, Komunyakaa, Morrison, Okada, Phillips, and Silko.
1330:TF   EASTC 300
ENGL 349-03 The Vietnam War in Literature and Film
Instructor: Rebekah Linh Collins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 310-03.This course will examine Vietnamese, diasporic Vietnamese, American, and other narratives of the war we call "Vietnam" from various theoretical perspectives including that of postcolonialism. We will read and view poetry, prose, and some non-canonical films that (re)consider the Indochinese wars through the lenses of race, class, language, gender, sexuality, and other attributes entwined with power and privilege. We will ask why those wars still matter today and what it means to be "postcolonial" or "postwar" in the twenty-first century. Works by Trinh T. Minh-ha, An-My Le, Hong-An Truong, Linh Dinh, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Isabelle Thuy Pelaud, Duong Van Mai Elliott and Thuong Vuong-Riddick may be included.
1030:TR   EASTC 301
ENGL 350-01 Chaucer's Women
Instructor: Chelsea Skalak, K Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-02.Patient Griselda, sensual Alisoun, long-suffering Constance, the irrepressible Wife of Bath - in The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer provides a wide range of women who alternately uphold and challenge the medieval boundaries of femininity. In this class we will explore medieval conceptions of gender, sexuality, and romance by way of Chaucer's most memorable women, read alongside confessional manuals, scientific treatises, and religious tracts that provide insight into how medieval scholars conceived of the differences between men and women.
1030:TR   DENNY 311
ENGL 366-01 Modern African-American Drama
Instructor: Edward Merwin
Course Description:
This course traces the evolution of African-American drama from the early twentieth century to the present, with particular emphasis on how both black and white dramatists have grappled with sweeping changes in the social and political context of African-American life. Among the plays that we will study are George Gershwin's opera "Porgy and Bess," Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin in the Sun," Ntozke Shange's "for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf," August Wilson's "Fences," and George C. Wolfe's "The Colored Museum." The course will include a field trip to an African-American play or musical in New York or Philadelphia.
0930:MWF   EASTC 300
ENGL 394-01 Revolutionary Milton
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston
Course Description:
In the popular imagination John Milton remains the grandfatherly Christian poet of Paradise Lost. While Paradise Lost is an epic poem about the fall of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, and thus Christian, the poem also radically addresses polemical subjects such as the role and place of women in an ideal society; the relationship between God and Christ the Son; censorship and printing; the question of personal responsibility; the definition of democracy. Paradise Lost, along with the Bible, was one of the most frequently read books in Colonial America, and Miltons work played a key role in forming our country. In order to get at these issues in the poem, we will read a variety of Miltons work, from the short play, Comus, to the prose tract on censorship, Areopagitica. We will discuss social and historical contexts of the later seventeenth century, in which thinkers such as Milton interrogated the role of monarchy and of religion in the state.
1330:MR   EASTC 300
ENGL 403-01 Literary Controversies, Critical Questions
Instructor: David Ball, K Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
In preparation for the writing of the senior thesis, the aim of this course is to reintroduce students to some of the key concepts within literary criticism ("author," "text," "ideology," "race," "gender," "empire"), as well as from other disciplines such as economic theory, psychoanalysis, and semiotics, which have guided contemporary literary theoretical inquiry. These terms will be approached not as a shared vocabulary among the theorists we study, but rather as themselves sites of contestation. Prose, poetry, and film will be read alongside these theoretical works to provide both a testing ground for their ideas and a way to complicate their presuppositions. Along the way we will constantly be querying the literature/theory distinction, determining to what degree we can perceive literary authors as critical thinkers and theorists as creative writers. Among the writers we will study are Althusser, Auster, Barthes, Benjamin, Butler, Bechdel, de Man, Derrida, Dickinson, Emerson, Freud, Foucault, Gates, Kafka, Marx, Morrison, Poe, Rushdie, Said, Saussure, and Wharton.
1330:T   EASTC 406
ENGL 403-02 Eudora Welty: Fiction, Photography, and the Southern Experience
Instructor: Carol Ann Johnston, K Wendy Moffat
Course Description:
The liveliness of Eudora Welty scholarship at her 2009 centennial shows Welty to be among the pantheon of American writers, one of the masters of the short story. Known from the beginning of her career in the late 1930s for its humorous and poignant depictions of life in rural Mississippi during the depression, Welty's work recently has been examined under the lenses of political and cultural criticism, and has been read compellingly as a part of the feminist canon. We will consider Welty's formal mastery as a writer of fiction, as well as reading her from post-structuralist critical points of view. We will also become familiar with the culture of the rural south, using as our starting point the fabulous photographs that Welty took during the depression.
1330:W   EASTC 406
ENGL 403-03 Literary Studies and the Scholarly Habitus
Instructor: Gregory Steirer
Course Description:
In preparation for the writing of the senior thesis, this course aims to help students develop an advanced understanding of the practice of research in literary studies and related disciplines. Over the course of the semester we will explore how research has been conceptualized at different periods in history, by practitioners of different institutional affiliation, and at different junctures in the evolution of literary studies as a discipline. In exploring these issues, we will also query the concepts of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity themselves, in part by applying them to students own research ideas. By the end of the course, students will have developed an advanced understanding of what scholarly research is, how to practice it, and what it ultimately is for. Primary texts will be determined based upon students interests and prospective thesis topics.
1330:R   EASTC 312