Spring 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ECON 111-01 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
0830:MWF   DENNY 317
ECON 111-02 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 111-04 Introduction to Microeconomics
Instructor: Andrew Farrant
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon consumer demand and upon the output and pricing decisions of business firms. The implications of actions taken by these decision-makers, operating within various market structures, upon the allocation of resources and the distribution of income are examined. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical environment within which economic decisions are made.
0930:MWF   DENNY 317
ECON 112-01 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Emily Marshall
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 08
ECON 112-02 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Emily Marshall
Course Description:
Permission of instructor required A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 08
ECON 112-03 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Robert Szarka
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
0830:MWF   ALTHSE 201
ECON 112-04 Introduction to Macroeconomics
Instructor: Robert Szarka
Course Description:
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 201
ECON 214-01 Population Issues in Developing Countries
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-01.This course will introduce the primary population issues in the context of developing countries. This course will focus on these particular issues: population growth, theory of demographic transition, mortality, fertility, family planning, reproductive health, family coping strategies, migration, urbanization, low fertility in industrialized nations, household economics, interactions between population issues and development, child survival and mortality, child labor and schooling, impacts of HIV/AIDS on population structure, and policies that are used to tackle the afore-mentioned issues.
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 201
ECON 214-02 Introduction to Public Choice
Instructor: Vlad Tarko
Course Description:
An economic topic requiring some exposure to introductory economic concepts. Past topics have included Middle Eastern Economies, Feminist Economics, Network Industries, and the Economic Analysis of Policy. Specific topics will be described in each semesters registration materials. Prerequisites: 111 and/or 112 depending upon the topic.
1030:TR   BOSLER 213
ECON 222-01 Environmental Economics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 228-01 Economic Analysis of Policy
Instructor: Tricia Hawks
Course Description:
This course introduces the basic economic techniques used in the analysis of public policy and applies these techniques to a variety of social problems and policies. The economic techniques taught include the analysis of market failure, benefit-cost analysis, and economic impact analysis. Applied topics vary, but are likely to include education and job training, public assistance, transportation policy, and environmental protection. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 268-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Instructor: Jonathan Cogliano
Course Description:
Neoclassical theories of economic behavior in the aggregate. Models will be used as a framework for analyzing the determination of the level of national output and for explaining fluctuations in employment, the price level, interest rates, productivity, and the rate of economic growth. Policy proposals will be appraised. Prerequisite: 111 and 112; MATH 170; and MATH 121 or MATH 225 or INBM 220 (for INBM majors only).
0900:TR   ALTHSE 110
ECON 268-02 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Instructor: Jonathan Cogliano
Course Description:
Neoclassical theories of economic behavior in the aggregate. Models will be used as a framework for analyzing the determination of the level of national output and for explaining fluctuations in employment, the price level, interest rates, productivity, and the rate of economic growth. Policy proposals will be appraised. Prerequisite: 111 and 112; MATH 170; and MATH 121 or MATH 225 or INBM 220 (for INBM majors only).
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
ECON 278-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
Instructor: William Bellinger
Course Description:
Neoclassical theory of relative prices of commodities and productive services under perfect and imperfect competition. The role of prices in the allocation and distribution of resources and commodities. Economic behavior of individual economic units like consumers, firms, and resource owners. Prerequisite: 111 and MATH 170.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 278-02 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
Instructor: William Bellinger
Course Description:
Neoclassical theory of relative prices of commodities and productive services under perfect and imperfect competition. The role of prices in the allocation and distribution of resources and commodities. Economic behavior of individual economic units like consumers, firms, and resource owners. Prerequisite: 111 and MATH 170.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 288-01 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Robert Szarka
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 207
ECON 288-02 Contending Economic Perspectives
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
A study of major heterodox economic theories such as Marxian, institutional, feminist, post-Keynesian, or Austrian economics. Students will study these contending economic perspectives through their historical evolution, methods and theoretical structures, and/or current policy debates. Prerequisites: 111 and 112.
1500:TF   ALTHSE 207
ECON 314-02 Introduction to Public Choice
Instructor: Vlad Tarko
Course Description:
Public Choice is the application of economics to the study of non-market phenomena. It is concerned with the economic theory of collective action, of the public sector, of bureaucracies, of religion, of politics (democratic and authoritarian), and of criminal activities. In this course we will explore questions such as: What is the difference between private and public goods? What are common-pool resources and club goods? Under what conditions is it efficient for a collective problem to be addressed by government, by private arrangements, or to be ignored and left unsolved? How do democracies work, and why are they vulnerable to be captured by special interests? Why are voters so poorly informed and, yet, so passionate in their errors? How do we decide whether a collective problem should be addressed at federal, state, or local level? What is self-governance? What are the main mechanisms by which private arrangements solve collective problems, and how do individuals solve their collective problems when states dont provide the necessary support or even actively work against general welfare?
0900:TR   ALTHSE 08
ECON 314-03 Introduction to Public Choice
Instructor: Vlad Tarko
Course Description:
Public Choice is the application of economics to the study of non-market phenomena. It is concerned with the economic theory of collective action, of the public sector, of bureaucracies, of religion, of politics (democratic and authoritarian), and of criminal activities. In this course we will explore questions such as: What is the difference between private and public goods? What are common-pool resources and club goods? Under what conditions is it efficient for a collective problem to be addressed by government, by private arrangements, or to be ignored and left unsolved? How do democracies work, and why are they vulnerable to be captured by special interests? Why are voters so poorly informed and, yet, so passionate in their errors? How do we decide whether a collective problem should be addressed at federal, state, or local level? What is self-governance? What are the main mechanisms by which private arrangements solve collective problems, and how do individuals solve their collective problems when states dont provide the necessary support or even actively work against general welfare?
1030:TR   BOSLER 213
ECON 314-04 Applied Empirical Data Analysis
Instructor: Stephen Erfle
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 300-02.This course provides students with the opportunity to undertake their own empirical investigation on topics of their choice. Students are welcome to use the information that I have gathered but they are also encouraged to obtain and analyze data of their choosing, subject to professor approval. Students have access to start of year and end of year physical activity and stature measures for more than 10,000 middle school students, two thirds of whom had daily PE, as well as school district level data for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This course will analyze the date obtained from this program. Students will learn how to use SPSS and Arc-GIS throughout the course of the semester. The class culminates in presenting your own findings in a poster presentation that is open to the public.
1230:W   ALTHSE 204
ECON 332-01 Economics of Natural Resources
Instructor: Nicola Tynan
Course Description:
This course uses microeconomics to analyze the use and conservation of natural resources, including energy, minerals, fisheries, forests, and water resources, among others. Broad themes include the roles of property rights, intergenerational equity, and sustainable development in an economy based on resource exploitation. Prerequisite: 278. For ENST, ENSC and INST majors, prerequisite is ECON 222.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 110
ECON 374-01 Econometrics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
Theory and applications of multiple regression analysis. The specification and estimation of econometric models, hypothesis testing, and interpretation of results. Emphasis is on practical applications from macro- and microeconomics using both cross-section and time-series data. Prerequisites: 268, 278 and one college statistics course (MATH 121 or 225).
1500:MR   ALTHSE 204
ECON 496-01 Austrian Political Economy
Instructor: Vlad Tarko
Course Description:
Political economy is the economic analysis of public policies, of institutions, and of political regimes. Unlike standard public choice, which focuses mainly on incentives, Austrian Political Economy (APE) tends to put a greater emphasis on the importance of (1) knowledge limitations involved in the attempts to discover and implement the best solutions to public problems and avoid unintended consequences; (2) long-term processes, rather than static analysis; and (3) ideology and culture. In its most general form, APE is trying to understand how to build robust institutions, meaning institutions that work well and produce prosperity even under weak assumptions about how much information people possess, how rational they are, and how well-intentioned they are.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 110
ECON 496-02 Political Economy of Health
Instructor: Mesude Kongar
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is 46 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes. Students of this course will contribute to community health by participating in community-based research in collaboration with a community agency serving health and well-being needs in the Carlisle-Harrisburg area.
1330:T   ALTHSE 109
ECON 496-03 "Neoliberalism" and Its Discontents: The Rise of the Chicago, UCLA, and UVA Schools of Thought
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the formation and development of the economic ideas associated with neoliberalism. The Chicago school will play a prominent role and to a lesser extent its intellectual offshoots UCLA and UVA as we explore the origins and rise of neoliberalism. Topics include: economic planning, the welfare state, the economist as expert, a case study of the role of economists advising Pinochets Chile, modeling and assessing the theory of the liberal dictator, popular opponents of neoliberalism, academic opponents of neoliberalism, and others. Readings include the works of Milton Friedman, Ronald Coase, Frank Knight, Arnold Harberger, Armen Alchian, Harold Demsetz, Friedrich Hayek, and others. Particular attention will be paid to the views of Milton Friedman, his role as an economic advisor and his views of economic advocacy. Opponents of neoliberalism will include: the MIT school represented by Paul Samuelson and Robert Solow, the UMASS Amherst school represented by Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis, the Notre Dame school represented by Philip Mirowskis The Road from Mont Pelerin,popular treatments such as Naomi Kleins The Shock Doctrine and others.
1330:R   ALTHSE 07
ECON 496-04 Economic History of the United States
Instructor: Nicola Tynan
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required. This seminar introduces you to the study of economic history through the reading and discussion of seminal articles U.S. economy history. We will explore the historical roots of current economic issues, such as changes in standards of living, technological change, income and wealth inequality, racial and gender differences in earnings and employment, causes and consequences of the Great Depression, the growth of government, education, social programs, infrastructure investment, and immigration. STATA will be used to illustrate the role of econometric analysis in improving our understanding of the past. Each student will select one topic to explore in greater depth for a brief research paper and presentation.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 206
ECON 500-01 Social Sustainability and Community Economic Development
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
 
ECON 500-02 Advanced Econometrics
Instructor: Anthony Underwood
Course Description:
 
ECON 500-03 Neoliberalism and Its Discontents
Instructor: Edward McPhail
Course Description:
 
ECON 550-01 Finding Causal Relationship Between Stock Market Returns and GDP Growth
Instructor: Emily Marshall
Course Description: