Fall 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 120-01 Life at the Extremes: A Survival Guide
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
The Weddell Seal holds its breath for 40 minutes while routinely diving to a depth of 1,500 feet in -1.6C water and Bar Headed Geese migrate at thousands of feet above the summit of Mt. Everest. How do these animals accomplish these seemingly amazing tasks? Questions of survival and more will be addressed in this study of comparative physiology. We will seek explanations of these phenomena by first evaluating the physical nature of these hostile environments and then exploring the mechanisms of survival. We will also investigate our own physiology and human limits of performance. Lecture will be enhanced by laboratory experiences in experimental physiology and vertebrate dissection. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:M   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 120-02 Life at the Extremes: A Survival Guide
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
The Weddell Seal holds its breath for 40 minutes while routinely diving to a depth of 1,500 feet in -1.6C water and Bar Headed Geese migrate at thousands of feet above the summit of Mt. Everest. How do these animals accomplish these seemingly amazing tasks? Questions of survival and more will be addressed in this study of comparative physiology. We will seek explanations of these phenomena by first evaluating the physical nature of these hostile environments and then exploring the mechanisms of survival. We will also investigate our own physiology and human limits of performance. Lecture will be enhanced by laboratory experiences in experimental physiology and vertebrate dissection. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:T   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 124-01 Biology of Behavior w/Lab
Instructor: Anthony Pires
Course Description:
This course explores the biological basis of animal behavior. We will use an evolutionary framework to consider why behaviors arise within animal species (including humans) and ask how neural systems shape, constrain and execute the types of behaviors that we observe in nature. Topics will include animal navigation, communication, mating systems and sociality. We will read selections from the primary research literature of behavioral biology as models of scientific thought and discourse. Laboratory and fieldwork will emphasize construction of good experimental questions, refinement of hypotheses, quantitative analysis of data and effective communication of research results. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1330:M   JAMESR 2218
0830:MWF   TOME 115
BIOL 124-02 Biology of Behavior w/Lab
Instructor: Anthony Pires
Course Description:
This course explores the biological basis of animal behavior. We will use an evolutionary framework to consider why behaviors arise within animal species (including humans) and ask how neural systems shape, constrain and execute the types of behaviors that we observe in nature. Topics will include animal navigation, communication, mating systems and sociality. We will read selections from the primary research literature of behavioral biology as models of scientific thought and discourse. Laboratory and fieldwork will emphasize construction of good experimental questions, refinement of hypotheses, quantitative analysis of data and effective communication of research results. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
1330:T   JAMESR 2218
0830:MWF   TOME 115
BIOL 128-01 The Molecular Basis of Disease
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.In order to understand and develop treatments for human disease, we must first understand the underlying molecular and cellular basis of disease. Through lecture and laboratory exercises, this introductory biology course will provide a basic understanding of biomolecules, genes, and cells. This information will be then be used to understand the normal physiology of select organ systems and to examine the pathophysiology and treatment of select diseases.
1030:TR   DANA 202
1330:R   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 128-02 The Secret Life of Plants
Instructor: Jason Smith
Course Description:
Its tempting to think of plants as passive sunbathing salad bars. But are they? Or are plants actively fighting to live and reproduce? More to the point, how do they ward off their enemies? Do they have allies among microbes, insects and other plants? Are they all stuck at the bottom of the food chain or are some feeding higher up? How do plant communities change and populations evolve? We will explore these and other plant ecology topics in the context of natural and agricultural ecosystems. Readings will draw from texts, primary and popular literature. Lectures will be complemented by hands-on investigations into plant ecology in laboratory, greenhouse and field settings. This course will give you a new appreciation for the dynamic life of plants and for the process of conducting, analyzing and communicating scientific research.
0930:MWF   DANA 201
1330:W   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 129-01 Changing Ocean Ecosystem W/Lab
Instructor: Michael Potthoff
Course Description:
An introduction to the biology of marine communities, including salt marshes and mangroves, intertidal zones, reefs, and deep-sea vents, among others. For each community, the physical characteristics of the environment as well as the physiological adaptations of the resident species will be examined. We will also focus on how marine communities are changing in response to anthropogenic stresses in light of concepts such as diversity indexes, keystone species, and disturbance theory. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Laboratory projects will emphasize experimental design and hypothesis testing. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week.
0900:TR   DANA 110
1330:W   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 216-01 Genetics
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 124 and PSYC 125.
0900:TR   DANA 202
1330:M   RNORTH 1316
BIOL 314-01 Ecology w/Lab
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
Study of the interactions of organisms with each other, and with their environment, at the level of the individual, the population, the community, and the ecosystem. Lectures and readings consider both the theory of ecology and data from empirical research in the classic and current literature. Laboratory and field studies explore how ecologists perform quantitative tests of hypotheses about complex systems in nature. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129 or ENST 131, 132 (or 130). This course is cross-listed as ENST 314.
1030:TR   RNORTH 1317
1330:R   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 318-01 Animal Development w/Lab
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
Material deals with descriptive embryology and the mechanisms of development including the genetic and biochemical levels. Laboratory includes observation of selected examples of invertebrate and vertebrate development and experimental investigations of developmental processes. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 124 and PSYC 125.
0930:MWF   DANA 202
1330:M   JAMESR 1218
BIOL 323-01 Algae, Fungi & Lichens W/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Study of the systematics, morphology, ecology, evolution, physiology and development of algae, fungi, and lichens. Lecture and discussion include examples and readings from classic and recent research. Laboratories include field surveys and collections, follow-up laboratory identifications, and experimental investigations including directed individual or small-group research projects. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129. Offered every other year.
0830:MW   DANA 101
1230:M   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 323-02 Algae, Fungi & Lichens W/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
Study of the systematics, morphology, ecology, evolution, physiology and development of algae, fungi, and lichens. Lecture and discussion include examples and readings from classic and recent research. Laboratories include field surveys and collections, follow-up laboratory identifications, and experimental investigations including directed individual or small-group research projects. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129. Offered every other year.
0830:MW   DANA 101
1230:W   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 326-01 Microbiology w/Lab
Instructor: Jennifer Wanat
Course Description:
Molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry (structure and function) of bacteria, archaea, and viruses. Includes an introduction to the immune system and mechanisms of medical control of microbes. Molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis are addressed via readings from the recent primary literature. Laboratory exercises include the isolation and characterization of unknown bacteria using traditional and molecular methods, and modern genomic approaches to characterizing host response to infection. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129 or ENST 131 and 132 (or 130). For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is 124 and PSYC 125. Offered every other year.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 08
1330:T   RNORTH 1316
BIOL 327-01 Developmental Neurobiology
Instructor: Mary Niblock
Course Description:
This course explores the development of the nervous system, from the early patterning of the neural plate, through the differentiation of embryonic cells into diverse neuronal subtypes, and culminating with the integration of multiple neuronal subtypes into the complex wiring circuits that underlie our sensory, motor, and cognitive abilities. We will study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neural specification, the formation of neuronal connections, neural patterning by programmed cell death, and experience-dependent modulation of neural circuits. We also will examine the ways that neural development can go awry. In the laboratory we will explore topics such as neural induction, cell lineage and fate determination, neuronal migration, axon guidance, activity-dependent development and critical periods, and the development of behavior. The focus of the course will be on the development of the mammalian nervous system, but the contributions of simpler animal models to our understanding of the human brain will be a secondary emphasis. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129, OR, BIOL 124 and PSYC 125, and NRSC 200 OR permission of the instructor.
1030:MWF   JAMESR 1228
1330:W   JAMESR 1228
BIOL 343-01 Metabolism
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 343-03. A survey of the metabolic processes in animals and plants, including signal transduction, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, and photosynthesis, as well as the biosynthesis of the major types of biomolecules. For each metabolic pathway, we will examine the regulation of enzymes and related genes, their energetic requirements, and the function of pathway end products. Both the normal functioning of metabolic pathways and common metabolic malfunctions, e.g., human inborn errors of metabolism, will be considered. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Students will complete detailed case studies focusing on human metabolism and metabolic disorders. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 343.
1030:TR   DANA 101
BIOL 343-02 Metabolism
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 343-02. A survey of the metabolic processes in animals and plants, including signal transduction, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, and photosynthesis, as well as the biosynthesis of the major types of biomolecules. For each metabolic pathway, we will examine the regulation of enzymes and related genes, their energetic requirements, and the function of pathway end products. Both the normal functioning of metabolic pathways and common metabolic malfunctions, e.g., human inborn errors of metabolism, will be considered. Selected readings from the primary literature and the popular press are required. Students will complete detailed case studies focusing on human metabolism and metabolic disorders. Three hours classroom a week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 343.
0900:TR   DANA 101
BIOL 401-01 Field Natural History Mosaic
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 310-01.Permission of Instructor Required.Part of the Natural History Sustainability Mosaic During the past fifty years, people have become nearly isolated from their natural environment. Fewer farms, urbanization, the expansion of suburbs, air conditioning, mall shopping, posted land, less access to waterways, forgotten victory gardens and a host of other societal changes as created a generation that is suffering from Nature Deficient Disorder. Even the science of Biology has become more concentrated in the cellular and molecular realm than the field sciences. This course will explore the realm of field biology and natural history in the Carlisle area and familiarize students with some of the common forms of life outside the classroom. Being familiar with the organisms that compose ecosystems enables a student to have a better understanding of the principals of ecology.
0930:MWF   KAUF 152
1330:W   KAUF 152
BIOL 412-01 Seminar
Instructor: Mary Niblock
Course Description:
Through detailed study of the primary biological literature, students acquire an understanding of the methodology and philosophy of scientific research. Includes study of the formulation of hypotheses, the design of experiments or observations to test these hypotheses, and the interpretation of results. This course will normally require a major research-based presentation and/or paper and may also involve the conduct of research by students. This course satisfies the requirement for a research experience for the biology major. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129, and one upper-level biology course.
1330:R   JAMESR 1228
BIOL 416-01 Population Genetics
Instructor: Dana Wohlbach
Course Description:
This is a course on advanced genetics in the genomics age. Whole genome sequences are accumulating at an increasingly rapid pace. Our current challenge is to uncover meaning in the hundreds of billions of base pairs that are now available. The fields of study that strive to make sense of all this variation are population and quantitative genetics. In this course, we will survey topics in population genetics, the study of frequencies of alleles in populations, and quantitative genetics, the study of continuously varying traits, with the goal of developing a deeper understanding of the connection between genotypes and phenotypes. This course will integrate lectures, in-class discussions, and wet and dry (computational) labs to provide a comprehensive perspective on population and quantitative genetics. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: BIOL 216
0900:TR   DANA 201
1330:W   RNORTH 1316
BIOL 550-01 A Diet Comparison of Sympatric Salamander Species (of the Cumberland Valley Region)
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
 
BIOL 550-02 Squirrel Food Preference
Instructor: Marcus Key
Course Description:
 
BIOL 550-03 American Toad Feeding Ecology and Survival Analysis
Instructor: Scott Boback
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-01 Yeast Evolutionary Genomics
Instructor: Dana Wohlbach
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-02 Effects of White-Tailed Deer on Understory Vegetation
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-03 Computational Analysis of Yeast Environmental Stress Response
Instructor: Dana Wohlbach
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-04 Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Characterization of Ascomycota Yeast From Detritivore
Instructor: Dana Wohlbach
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-05 Determination of the Optimal Position for Recovery and Ventilation Following Exercise
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-06 The Role of EGR1 in Human Leukemia
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-07 Investigating Scalloped Function in SNb Patterning in Drosophila
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-08 Cellular Interactions in the Inflammatory Response
Instructor: Tiffany Frey
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-09 CRISPR Knockout of 1L-1B in Human Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-10 Yeast Evolutionary Genomics
Instructor: Dana Wohlbach
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-11 Physiology of a Resistance Mask
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-12 Student/Faculty Collaborative Research
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-13 The Role of Non-Coding RNA Molecule TERRA in Budding Yeast Meiosis
Instructor: Jennifer Wanat
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-14 An Investigation into the Occurrence of Chytrid in the Cumberland Valley
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-15 Diet, Age, and Growth Structure of Flathead Catfish in Susquehanna River
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-16 Exercise Physiology: Airway Resistance in Exercise Training
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description: