Spring 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles. This course fulfills the Arts (Division I C) distribution requirement.
1030:MWF   WEISS 235
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings. This course fulfills the Arts (Division I C) distribution requirement.
0930:TR   WEISS 343
ARTH 123-01 Fundamentals of Sculpture and Three-Dimensional Design
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
A studio course covering basic elements of three-dimensional composition and sculpture. Students will construct sculptures examining a range of media and fabrication techniques. This course fulfills the Arts (Division I C) distribution requirement.
1330:MW   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 205-01 The Visual Culture of East Asian Buddhism
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 205-04. This course introduces students to the study of the history of the visual culture of Buddhism in East Asia, and to the study of pre-modern visual culture more generally. Each week will be devoted to the discussion of a particular keyword in Buddhist art, beginning with the basics such as "Buddha," and "Bodhisattva," toward more specialized topics, including "transformation tableau," and "pagoda." In conjunction with the investigation of keywords in Buddhist art, we will also address theories of iconography/iconology, space, spectatorship, etc. Class discussions will be supplemented by viewing sessions of Buddhist art in the Trout Gallery.
0900:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 205-02 The Japanese Woodblock Print
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 205-05. This course provides a thorough introduction to the woodblock print -- Japan's most celebrated artistic medium -- from its emergence in the mid-17th century to the modern era. Technical developments, major genres, and master designers are explored within the context of the print's relationship to the urban culture of early modern and modern Japan. Topics including censorship, theatricality, the representation of war, nationalism, and Japonisme. Special emphasis is placed on an examination of habits of pictorial representation and protocols of viewing unique to the Japanese print medium.
0930:MWF   WEISS 235
ARTH 206-01 Museum Studies
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Introduces students to the history, role, nature, and administration of museums. It examines the emergence and development of museums and the political, social, and ethical issues that they face. Case studies include: government funding of the arts, the lure and trap of the blockbuster, T-Rex "Sue", the Nazi Entartete Kunst exhibition, the Enola Gay exhibition, war memorials, the Holocaust Museum, public sculpture, conservation, museum architecture, auction houses, and the repatriation of cultural property. This course is open to all students and is especially relevant to those studying the fine arts, anthropology, archaeology, history, American studies, and public policy. Offered every two years.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 106
ARTH 207-01 Criticism and Theory in the Arts
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
An introduction to critical strategies in and theoretical approaches to the visual arts from Plato through Postmodernism. Particular emphasis is placed on close analysis and discussion of texts. The course addresses issues of historiography, critical theory, and contemporary art criticism. Prerequisite: 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor.
1330:TR   WEISS 219
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing. This course fulfills the Arts (Division I C) distribution requirement.
1330:TR   GDYRST 101
ARTH 224-01 Wheelwork Ceramics
Instructor: Barbara Diduk
Course Description:
A studio course exploring expressive possibilities offered by the potters wheel. Students will examine both utilitarian and sculptural aspects of the medium. A variety of clays, glazes and firing approaches will be examined. This course fulfills the Arts (Division I C) distribution requirement.
0930:TR   GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 226-01 Sculpture Ceramics
Instructor: Barbara Diduk
Course Description:
A sculpture course further examining three-dimensional problems covered in the basic three-dimensional design course. The course will focus on clay as the primary (but not exclusive) fabrication material. Students will examine a range of firing, glazing, and construction techniques. Prerequisite: 123, 224 or permission of the instructor.
1330:TR   GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 230-01 Life Drawing
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
The course will be devoted to working from the human form during which the students will be expected to develop a sense of two-dimensional line and three-dimensional illusionistic form through the use of such graphic media as pen and ink, pencil, charcoal, Cont crayon, etc. Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.
1530:TR   GDYRST UPST
ARTH 260-01 Studio Lighting and Practices
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Selected techniques and concepts in studio, taught at the introductory to intermediate level. The content of each course will be altered periodically. Prerequisites: depending on topic or permission of the instructor.
1530:TR   GDYRST 101
ARTH 260-02 Post Studio Projects
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
This special topics class will investigate art making outside the traditional studio or art classroom. Students will devise and execute multiple art projects through individual and collaborative research. Projects may include performances, site-specific interventions and installation-based art, among other non-media specific approaches to making art.
1030:MW   GDYRST 101
ARTH 313-01 Modern Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course surveys key artistic movements and styles in a period of roughly one hundred years, beginning with Realism in the 1840s France and ending with Abstract Express-ionism in 1950s America. Much of the course focuses on painting, though discussions of architecture, design, sculpture and photography also play an important role. We begin with the question of what modernism is: When did it begin? What makes a work of art "modern"? How is modernism different from what preceded it? Students learn to recognize, understand and discuss the defining features of modernism in its major manifestations, while also developing an understanding of themes such as the role of African art in modernism, the changing dynamics between the fine arts and popular culture, the role of technology as an influence on art, and the place of particular critics, galleries, and museums in shaping the discourses of modernism. Individual research projects give students the chance to explore a specific artist, style or theme in depth, while a field trip to National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C. provide an opportunity to see significant works of modern art firsthand. Assigned reading incorporate both secondary sources as well as artist's manifestos and aesthetic philosophies as primary source text. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   WEISS 221
ARTH 322-01 Digital Studio 2: Time-Based Process
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
This course will allow students to explore time-based approaches to making art with a focus on the moving image and sound. Topics will include short film, animation, experimental film, and installation art. This course will be beneficial to students working at an advanced level and are interested in the possibilities time-based mediums can bring to their process. The work of artists and media specific art trends, from the 20th century to the present, will provide a working model for the course. Process and making will be the main focus, and students will be encouraged to consider the relationship between digital processes and traditional mediums such as drawing and sculpture. Students will gain a thorough understanding of editing in Apples Final Cut Pro. Prerequisites: ARTH 122 and one studio course at the 200-level or higher, or permission of instructor.
0930:TR   GDYRST 101
ARTH 327-01 Advanced Painting
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
A second-level studio painting course concentrating on the figure, and covering advanced techniques, alternative materials, and aspects of contemporary and historical practice. Prerequisite: 227.
1330:TR   WEISS 342
ARTH 330-01 Advanced Life Drawing
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
Advanced problems and issues in drawing the human form. Prerequisite: 230 or permission of the instructor.
1530:TR   GDYRST UPST
ARTH 360-01 Studio Projects
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
Selected advanced studio techniques and concepts. The content of each course will be altered periodically. Prerequisites: two studio art courses at the 100- or 200-level, or permission of the instructor.
1330:W   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 391-01 Topics on Modern Design in East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 305-01. Traditional Chinese and Japanese art and design served as an important source of inspiration for European modernism. But what happened to art and design within China and Japan during the modern period? Despite China's traditional stronghold in modular design and Japan's current prestige in design culture, the two countries faced incredible challenges during the late 19th and early 20th century as they struggled with their own cultures' pasts and the modern concept of design. The class offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of modern East Asian art and examines how the concept of design emerged and developed in Japan and China in relation to both fine arts and industry in a broad cross-cultural nexus. While design connected modern China and Japan in ways unprecedented, the two cultures also adopted different design strategies defined by their respective cultural and historical conditions.
1330:TF   WEISS 221
ARTH 500-01 Metal Working
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-02 Functional Sculpture: Art in Motion
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description: