Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 101-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
This course is a critical survey of western art beginning with the Ancient Near East (approximately 4000 B.C.) through the Gothic period in Europe (early 1300s). Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of style, subject-matter, and function within an historical context, and especially on the student's ability to develop skills in visual analysis. Developing appropriate vocabularies with which to discuss and analyze works of art and imagery will also be stressed, along with learning to evaluate scholarly interpretations of them.
0930:MWF   WEISS 235
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1330:MR   WEISS 235
ARTH 108-01 Arts of East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 108-01. This course introduces students to a selection of objects and sites that elicit new modes of cultural perception and insight into the artistic cultures of China, Korea, and Japan. Loosely arranged in a chronological order, each week is devoted to in-depth examination of a different type of object, medium, and format. The diverse mediums (sculpture, ceramics, metalwork, lacquer, prints, painting, calligraphy, photography, performance, and architecture) and the long historical span covered in class will chart how culture traveled within East Asia, and later, globally, as well as each cultures distinctive methods of adaptation over time. Major themes include the relationship between artistic production and sociopolitical and socioeconomic development, cultural exchange, aesthetics, impact of religion, power and authority, gender, and issues of modernity. Lectures are supplemented by viewing sessions in the Trout Gallery.This course is cross-listed as EASN 108.
1030:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
1330:MW   WEISS 343
ARTH 123-01 Fundamentals of Sculpture
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
A studio course covering basic elements of three-dimensional composition and sculpture. Students will construct sculptures examining a range of media and fabrication techniques.
0930:MW   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 123-02 Fundamentals of Sculpture
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
A studio course covering basic elements of three-dimensional composition and sculpture. Students will construct sculptures examining a range of media and fabrication techniques.
1330:MW   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 209-01 The Japanese Woodblock Print
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 209-01. This course provides a thorough introduction to the woodblock print Japans most celebrated artistic mediumfrom its emergence in the mid-17th century to the modern era. Technical developments, major genres, and master designers are explored within the context of the prints relationship to the urban culture of early modern and modern Japan. Topics including censorship, theatricality, the representation of war, nationalism, and Japonisme. Special emphasis is placed on an examination of habits of pictorial representation and protocols of viewing unique to the Japanese print medium. Lectures are supplemented by viewing sessions in the Trout Gallery.This course is cross-listed as EASN 209.
1330:TF   WEISS 235
ARTH 213-01 Gothic Pilgrimage
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-02. This course considers the visual arts of the late Gothic era in the major European cities, courts, and religious centers as seen through the eyes of a pilgrim c. 1400 en route from Hereford to Rome (along the via Francigena), Rome to Jerusalem, and back to Hereford (along the banking trade routes via Cologne). The sites selected trace well-known routes that pilgrims followed to the Holy Land and the objects and monuments they encountered: e.g. the city itself, principal sacred and civic structures, altarpieces, reliquaries, and tombs of saints and rulers. Readings and discussions will examine medieval notions of pilgrimage and its role in late medieval society, with a focus on the rituals and objects associated with death, burial, afterlife, and commemoration. Each object will be considered within the broader fabric of its surroundings, paying particular attention to the rituals and physical context associated with the object and how it would have been experienced by a pilgrim.
1330:MR   WEISS 219
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-02. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
0930:TR   WEISS 327
ARTH 221-02 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-03. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
1330:TR   WEISS 327
ARTH 224-01 Wheelwork Ceramics
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
A studio course exploring expressive possibilities offered by the potters wheel. Students will examine both utilitarian and sculptural aspects of the medium. A variety of clays, glazes and firing approaches will be examined.
0930:MW   GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 227-01 Fundamentals of Painting
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
A basic studio course exploring the techniques, practices and history of painting and theories of color. Working from observation, subject matter will range from still-life and landscape to architecture and the figure. Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.
1330:TR   WEISS 342
ARTH 228-01 Printmaking Survey
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
A studio course in which students will gain a working knowledge in each of the three major areas of printmaking: intaglio, lithography, and relief-printing. Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.
1530:TR   WEISS 340
ARTH 235-01 Post Studio Projects
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
The course provides an introduction to a variety of art making processes and philosophies outside a traditional studio context. Projects focus on individual and collaborative experiences that are not media specific; students create site-specific interventions, text-based installations, and performances, among other explorations, to consider critical and conceptual approaches to art.Prerequisite: One studio course or permission of instructor.
1030:TR   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 252-01 Philosophy of Art
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 252-01. The discipline of aesthetics is primarily concerned with philosophical questions about art and beauty. This course will examine classic and contemporary Western discussions of such questions as, What is art? How can we determine what a work of art means? Are beauty and other aesthetic qualities subjective or objective? How should the quality of a work of art be assessed? Is there a general way to describe the creative process? What are the driving forces in the unfolding of art history? We will encounter such giants of the Western intellectual tradition as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Hegel, and also such contemporary figures as Arthur Danto, Richard Wollheim, and Kendall Walton. Prerequisites: one previous course in art history or philosophy, or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as PHIL 252.
1500:MR   BOSLER 208
ARTH 300-01 Italian Renaissance Art 1250-1450
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-03. A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from approximately 1250 to 1450. The works of Giotto, Pisano, Donatello, Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, and Massacio, among others, will be addressed. Issues of style, patronage, and function will be considered within the political and cultural contexts of the 13th through 15th centuries. Critical and theoretical writings of the period will also be discussed. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   WEISS 221
ARTH 313-01 Modern Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course surveys key artistic movements and styles in a period of roughly one hundred years, beginning with Realism in the 1840s France and ending with Abstract Express-ionism in 1950s America. Much of the course focuses on painting, though discussions of architecture, design, sculpture and photography also play an important role. We begin with the question of what modernism is: When did it begin? What makes a work of art "modern"? How is modernism different from what preceded it? Students learn to recognize, understand and discuss the defining features of modernism in its major manifestations, while also developing an understanding of themes such as the role of African art in modernism, the changing dynamics between the fine arts and popular culture, the role of technology as an influence on art, and the place of particular critics, galleries, and museums in shaping the discourses of modernism. Individual research projects give students the chance to explore a specific artist, style or theme in depth, while a field trip to National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C. provide an opportunity to see significant works of modern art firsthand. Assigned reading incorporate both secondary sources as well as artist's manifestos and aesthetic philosophies as primary source text. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor. This course surveys key artistic movements and styles in a period of roughly one hundred years, beginning with Realism in the 1840s France and ending with Abstract Express-ionism in 1950s America. Much of the course focuses on painting, though discussions of architecture, design, sculpture and photography also play an important role. We begin with the question of what modernism is: When did it begin? What makes a work of art "modern"? How is modernism different from what preceded it? Students learn to recognize, understand and discuss the defining features of modernism in its major manifestations, while also developing an understanding of themes such as the role of African art in modernism, the changing dynamics between the fine arts and popular culture, the role of technology as an influence on art, and the place of particular critics, galleries, and museums in shaping the discourses of modernism. Individual research projects give students the chance to explore a specific artist, style or theme in depth, while a field trip to National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C. provide an opportunity to see significant works of modern art firsthand. Assigned reading incorporate both secondary sources as well as artist's manifestos and aesthetic philosophies as primary source text. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.
1330:TF   WEISS 219
ARTH 321-01 Advanced Drawing
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
A studio course to explore further, those issues covered in 122, but focusing on the creation of light and space. Landscape, architecture, still-life and the model will serve as subject matter. A large variety of media will be used, including pastel, monotype, ink, acrylic paint and charcoal. Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.
0930:TR   GDYRST UPST
ARTH 360-01 Advanced Studio Drawing
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
Selected advanced studio techniques and concepts. The content of each course will be altered periodically. Prerequisites: two studio art courses at the 100- or 200-level, or permission of the instructor.
 
ARTH 360-02 Advanced Topics in Printmaking
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
Selected advanced studio techniques and concepts. The content of each course will be altered periodically. Prerequisites: two studio art courses at the 100- or 200-level, or permission of the instructor.
 
ARTH 407-01 Art History Senior Seminar
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
An intensive seminar wherein students conduct original research on selected works of art as part of curating a formal, public exhibition in The Trout Gallery. Research is directed towards interpretive essays that go through multiple writing revisions, resulting in a publishedexhibition catalogue edited by the seminar faculty member and Trout Gallery Staff, and designed by Dickinson College Design Services Staff. Students work collaboratively as curators and contributors to the catalogue, and undertake a professional-level experience, most often reserved for graduate study or museum professionals. All of the senior majors' art historical knowledge and critical skills will be put to use in the Senior Seminar with the goal of further refining their ability to conduct advanced research and formal, polished writing.Prerequisite: Senior Art History majors only. An intensive seminar wherein students conduct original research on selected works of art as part of curating a formal, public exhibition in The Trout Gallery. Research is directed towards interpretive essays that go through multiple writing revisions, resulting in a publishedexhibition catalogue edited by the seminar faculty member and Trout Gallery Staff, and designed by Dickinson College Design Services Staff. Students work collaboratively as curators and contributors to the catalogue, and undertake a professional-level experience, most often reserved for graduate study or museum professionals. All of the senior majors' art historical knowledge and critical skills will be put to use in the Senior Seminar with the goal of further refining their ability to conduct advanced research and formal, polished writing.Prerequisite: Senior Art History majors only.
1500:TF   WEISS 219
ARTH 410-01 Senior Studio Seminar, Part 1
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
The first in a two-course sequence required for senior studio art majors. Critiques of students' work will include examination of timely topics in the visual arts and the relationship of the artist to society. Critiques, selected critical readings, museum visits and visiting artists will provide the basis for discussion. Prerequisite: Majors only or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: One studio course.
1330:W   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 500-01 Sculpture Mixed Media
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-02 Abstraction from Life
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-03 Advanced Wheelwork and Ceramic Processes
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-04 Experimental Intaglio Printmaking
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-05 A Time-Based Narrative
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-06 Sculpture: Advanced Processes in Wood
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description: