Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARTH 102-01 An Introduction to the History of Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course surveys art of the European renaissance through the contemporary period. Art will be examined within the historical context in which it was produced, with attention to contemporary social, political, religious, and intellectual movements. Students will examine the meaning and function of art within the different historical periods. In addition, students will learn to analyze and identify different artistic styles.
1030:TR   WEISS 235
ARTH 122-01 Fundamentals of Composition and Drawing
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
Working from observation and using a variety of media, this basic studio drawing course will explore issues common to both representational and non-representational art. This course serves as the foundation to upper-level two-dimensional offerings.
0930:MW   WEISS 343
ARTH 130-01 Art and Sustainability
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
This course promotes themes of sustainability and social engagement as the catalyst for artmaking. Primarily investigated through the design and construction of sculptures, installation art or other creative acts, students will explore creative practices exemplified by land art, social practice art, collaborative art, and social sculpture, among others.
0930:TR   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 160-01 Fundamentals of Metalwork
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
This course offers an introduction to the use of various metals and metalworking processes used in the construction of sculptures. Welding, forging and casting processes will be explored to design, create, and display a number of sculpture projects made in this class.
1330:W   GDYRST DOWN
ARTH 205-01 The Visual Culture of East Asian Buddhism
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 205-01. This course introduces students to the study of the history of the visual culture of Buddhism in East Asia, and to the study of pre-modern visual culture more generally. Each week will be devoted to the discussion of a particular keyword in Buddhist art, beginning with the basics such as "Buddha," and "Bodhisattva," toward more specialized topics, including "transformation tableau," and "pagoda." In conjunction with the investigation of keywords in Buddhist art, we will also address theories of iconography/iconology, space, spectatorship, etc. Class discussions will be supplemented by viewing sessions of Buddhist art in the Trout Gallery.
1030:TR   WEISS 219
ARTH 205-02 Greek Art & Archaeology
Instructor: Marie Cummings
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARCH 120-01 and CLST 221-01. A general introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from Prehistoric to Hellenistic times: Bronze Age civilizations (Cycladic, NE Aegean and Trojan, Minoan, Helladic/Mycenaean); Protogeometric, Geometric, Archaeic, Classical, and Hellenistic Greece. A survey of architecture (temple, secular, funerary), sculpture, vase-painting, monumental painting, metalwork, and minor arts of these periods, both on mainland Greece and in the Greek colonies (Asia Minor, Pontus, Syria, Phoenice, Egypt, S. Italy and Sicily); comparative study of typological, iconographical, stylistic, and technical aspects and developments; styles and schools, regional trends. Historical contextualization of ancient Greek art and brief consideration of socio-economic patterns, political organization, religion, and writing. Evaluation of the ancient Greek artistic legacy and contribution to civilization. Field trips to archaeological collections and Museums.
0900:TR   DENNY 317
ARTH 206-01 Museum Studies
Instructor: Phillip Earenfight
Course Description:
Introduces students to the history, role, nature, and administration of museums. It examines the emergence and development of museums and the political, social, and ethical issues that they face. Case studies include: government funding of the arts, the lure and trap of the blockbuster, T-Rex "Sue", the Nazi Entartete Kunst exhibition, the Enola Gay exhibition, war memorials, the Holocaust Museum, public sculpture, conservation, museum architecture, auction houses, and the repatriation of cultural property. This course is open to all students and is especially relevant to those studying the fine arts, anthropology, archaeology, history, American studies, and public policy. Offered every two years.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 106
ARTH 207-01 Criticism and Theory in the Arts
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
An introduction to critical strategies in and theoretical approaches to the visual arts from Plato through Postmodernism. Particular emphasis is placed on close analysis and discussion of texts. The course addresses issues of historiography, critical theory, and contemporary art criticism. Prerequisite: 101 or 102 or permission of the instructor.
1330:TF   WEISS 221
ARTH 212-01 Michelangelo-Man & Myth
Instructor: Melinda Schlitt
Course Description:
In this course, we will explore the figure and art of Michelangelo from a historiographic and critical perspective. Understanding his role as an artist and the effect of his art on his contemporaries and subsequent generations of artists, critics, and scholars through our own era will be a primary goal. Readings will be drawn from a variety of primary and secondary sources, and will include writings by Michelangelo himself, critical and theoretical commentaries, historical narratives, and art-historical interpretations. Conflicts within the scholarly community about how we might understand and reconstruct his life will also be addressed, as well as how the idea of the creative process was constructed and enacted during the Renaissance in Italy.Prerequisite: 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.
1330:W   WEISS 219
ARTH 217-01 Modern and Contemporary Architecture
Instructor: Lisa Dorrill
Course Description:
This course examines the character and development of Modern and Contemporary architecture, with emphasis on the following stylistic periods: Art Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, International Style, Post-Modernism, and Deconstruction. Major architects to be studied include Wright, Gropius, Le Corbusier, Mies, Johnson, Venturi, Gehry, Koolhaas, Gang, and Hadid. Students will also examine 20th and 21st-century urban planning. Through discussions, lectures, and extensive readings primary and secondary sources, students will become familiar with notable architectural styles of the 20th and early 21st centuries; understand the contemporary issues shaping the development of such styles, including politics, social movements, religion, philosophy, and developments in technology; gain the ability to discuss and write about architecture; and establish a critical framework and approach for analyzing architectural history. A field trip to Fallingwater in Western PA will also enhance their understanding of architectural design, construction, and legacy.
1500:MR   WEISS 221
ARTH 221-01 Introduction to Photography
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 310-03. An entry-level course in black-and-white photography emphasizing theory, history, and practice. Students learn how to create images, use cameras, develop film and make prints using conventional darkroom processes. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop as well as the basics of scanning and digital printing.
1330:TR   WEISS 327
ARTH 223-01 Digital Studio 1: Image Manipulation and Experimental Processes
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-10. This course will focus on 2-dimensional studio processes in the digital environment. It will also explore how digital processes can be used in conjunction with traditional processes like drawing, painting, and printmaking. The initial goal of this class will be to gain a thorough understanding of Adobe Photoshop for image manipulation. As the semester progresses, the class will explore uses of digital technology in contemporary art practice, including experimental processes. *Please note: this is not a photography course, some photo related processes will be part of the class, but those students looking for a more traditional approach to photography should consider the 221 Intro to Photography class. Prerequisite: 122, 221, or permission of the instructor.
0930:MW   GDYRST 101
ARTH 224-01 Wheelwork Ceramics
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
A studio course exploring expressive possibilities offered by the potters wheel. Students will examine both utilitarian and sculptural aspects of the medium. A variety of clays, glazes and firing approaches will be examined.
0930:MW   GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 226-01 Ceramic Sculpture
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
This introductory course examines the principal attributes of sculpture with a focus on clay as the primary fabrication material. Students will examine a range of firing, glazing, and construction techniques. Satisfies 3D requirement for the studio art major.
1330:MW   GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 227-01 Fundamentals of Painting
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
A basic studio course exploring the techniques, practices and history of painting and theories of color. Working from observation, subject matter will range from still-life and landscape to architecture and the figure. Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.
0930:TR   WEISS 342
ARTH 230-01 Life Drawing
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
The course will be devoted to working from the human form during which the students will be expected to develop a sense of two-dimensional line and three-dimensional illusionistic form through the use of such graphic media as pen and ink, pencil, charcoal, Cont crayon, etc. Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.
1330:TR   GDYRST UPST
ARTH 305-01 Topics on Modern Design in East Asia
Instructor: Wei Ren
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 305-01. Traditional Chinese and Japanese art and design served as an important source of inspiration for European modernism. But what happened to art and design within China and Japan during the modern period? Despite Chinas traditional stronghold in modular design and Japans current prestige in design culture, the two countries faced incredible challenges during the late 19th and early 20th century as they struggled with their own cultures pasts and the modern concept of art and design. This class offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of modern East Asian art and examines how the concept of design emerged and developed in Japan and China in relation to both fine arts and industry in a broad cross-cultural nexus. While design connected modern China and Japan in ways unprecedented, the two cultures also adopted different design strategies defined by their respective cultural and historical conditions. The class is discussion based and is supplemented by a fieldtrip to Washington D.C. Prerequisite: ARTH 108 or ARTH 209 or two art history or two non-language EASN courses.
1330:T   WEISS 219
ARTH 313-01 Modern Art
Instructor: Elizabeth Lee
Course Description:
This course surveys key artistic movements and styles in a period of roughly one hundred years, beginning with Realism in the 1840s France and ending with Abstract Express-ionism in 1950s America. Much of the course focuses on painting, though discussions of architecture, design, sculpture and photography also play an important role. We begin with the question of what modernism is: When did it begin? What makes a work of art "modern"? How is modernism different from what preceded it? Students learn to recognize, understand and discuss the defining features of modernism in its major manifestations, while also developing an understanding of themes such as the role of African art in modernism, the changing dynamics between the fine arts and popular culture, the role of technology as an influence on art, and the place of particular critics, galleries, and museums in shaping the discourses of modernism. Individual research projects give students the chance to explore a specific artist, style or theme in depth, while a field trip to National Gallery of Art and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C. provide an opportunity to see significant works of modern art firsthand. Assigned reading incorporate both secondary sources as well as artist's manifestos and aesthetic philosophies as primary source text. Prerequisite: 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   WEISS 221
ARTH 326-01 Intaglio Printmaking
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
An in-depth exploration of etching, engraving, aquatint and other techniques of drawing on, and printing from metal plates. Photo-etching and working in color will also be covered. Prerequisite: 122 or permission of the instructor.
1330:MW   WEISS 340
ARTH 330-01 Advanced Life Drawing
Instructor: Todd Arsenault
Course Description:
Advanced problems and issues in drawing the human form. Prerequisite: 230 or permission of the instructor.
1330:TR   GDYRST UPST
ARTH 360-01 Documentary Photography and The Picture Story
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 310-04. This course will explore and introduce experienced Black-and-White photographers to the traditional and contemporary use of Documentary Photography. By studying the history of photo-journalism, as wll as, contemporary artists, students will engage their surroundings and develop a body of photographic work based on short and long term photographic essays. The semester will culminate with an Exhibition of these photographic essays.
1530:TR   GDYRST 101
ARTH 360-02 Advanced Ceramics
Instructor: Rachel Eng
Course Description:
This class is centered on strengthening technical, research, and personal project development skills to further each students individual studio practice. We will focus on self-directed projects (utilitarian and sculptural), and consider how we display and install our finished projects. Individual and group discussions will be integral, as well as frequent one on one meetings. Through readings and class discussions that focus on established art theory and contemporary artists and critics in the field, we will gain fluency in speaking about your and others art.
1530:TR   GDYRST CERAMICS
ARTH 411-01 Senior Studio, Part 2
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
Second half of the required, yearlong capstone for senior studio art majors. This course will continue with the critique-based model of independent studio practice as established in the first semester. The main focus of this course will be completing a fully developed body of thesis work for exhibition in the Trout Gallery, and the production of a supporting catalog. Prerequisite: 410
 
ARTH 500-01 Installation Art and Experimental Processes
Instructor: Anthony Cervino
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-02 Experimental Printmaking
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-03 Advanced Printmaking
Instructor: Ward Davenny
Course Description:
 
ARTH 500-04 Studies in Advanced Photographic Processes
Instructor: Andrew Bale
Course Description: