Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 101-01 Introduction to Native American Studies
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to the major strands of Native American Studies including contemporary issues, cultural representations (music, dance, literature, art . . . ) law, history, and methodology, by addressing some of the following questions: What contemporary issues are Native Americans dealing with today? Who are they? Where do they live? How do Native nations relate to the U.S.? How do Native Hawaians and Alaska Natives fit into this discussion? To address these questions, students will take part in events scheduled for the centennial of the closing of the Carlisle Indian School, the first boarding school sponsored by the U.S. government to colonize and assimilate Native children into American society. Students will explore historic representations of American Indians and the continued legacy of these representations; as well as, contemporary Native self-representations through literature and film, art, dance and music. Additionally, the class will learn from Native storytellers, authors, playwrights and artists.
0930:MWF   DENNY 212
AMST 101-02 American Popular Culture
Instructor: Beenash Jafri
Course Description:
This course will provide you with tools for critical media analysis. In our examination of popular cultural textsincluding films, music videos, TV shows, advertisements and video gameswe will draw upon theoretical frameworks from media and cultural studies, covering topics such as media production, representation, spectatorship and the politics of digital media. Well investigate the construction and contestation of power, difference and identity in and through these texts, with particular attention to the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality. The course begins by investigating our organizing terms: America and popular culture. The remainder of the course will introduce concepts that will help you to analyze how popular culture is produced, consumed and distributed; and how it is negotiated and contested by both artists and spectators/consumers. Course assignments and tests are all oriented towards the goal of developing your skills as a pop culture critic. To get the most out of this class, I encourage you to bring and be ready to discuss examples of popular culture as they relate to weekly topics.
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
AMST 200-01 Native American Women and Feminisms
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-04. This course will explore the contemporary trends in the study of Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Women by addressing the following questions: What is the usefulness of gender as a category of analysis? How have Native women been situated in scholarship on women and gender? How are Native women situated within tribal traditions? How are womens and gender roles structured, traditionally, within Native societies? In the wake of settler colonialism in North America, how have womens (and gender) roles remained the same, how have they changed? What are the current configurations of gender identity in Native communities, including two-spirit and multiple genders? Throughout the semester students will be introduced to Native and Indigenous feminisms (theory and praxis). We will look at the historic relationship between Native women and the early leaders of Womens Rights in the U.S. We will explore Native womens storytelling as sites of knowledge production and activism. We will study material culture photography, archival records, and art and discuss how to recognize Native womens presence in the archives. To this end, we will take advantage of art exhibits/lectures at the Trout Gallery, and of the Carlisle Indian Schools archival materials -- digitized and physical housed at Dickinson College and the Cumberland County Historical Society.
1230:MWF   DENNY 104
AMST 200-02 One Drop, Two Drops: Cultural Understandings of Black Multiraciality
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06. This course will explore notions of black multiraciality that have existed in the U.S. from the colonial era and continue to have traction in our present day. To facilitate this exploration, we will discuss the emergence of certain ideas and their historical contexts, such as the one-drop rule (rule of hypodescent) and the tragic mulatta/o trope. We will also discuss the Census Movement, which emerged in the 1990s to change how people can identify racially and ethnically on the U.S. Census. Throughout the course, we will examine the literature, art, and other cultural productions about and/or from mixed race people of African descent. This will allow us to compare and contrast ideas circulating in U.S. law and the social sciences to ideas that are in the register of cultural representation.
1030:TR   DENNY 304
AMST 201-01 Introduction to American Studies
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency. Introduces students to basic theories and methods used for the interdisciplinary analysis of U.S. cultural materials and to the multiplicity of texts used for cultural analysis (mass media, music, film, fiction and memoir, sports, advertising, and popular rituals and practices). Particular attention is paid to the interplay between systems of representation and social, political, and economic institutions, and to the production, dissemination, and reception of cultural materials. Students will explore the shaping power of culture as well as the possibilities of human agency.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
AMST 202-01 Workshop in Cultural Analysis
Instructor: Sharon O'Brien
Course Description:
Intensive workshop focused on theoretical approaches to the interpretation of social and cultural materials. The course provides an early exposure to theories and methods that will be returned to in greater depth in the senior year. Intended to develop independent skills in analysis of primary texts and documents.
1330:MR   STERN 12
AMST 303-01 Critical and Cultural Theories of the Media
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 220-04. This course is an introduction to important theoretical turning points in cultural and media studies and to the progressive politics undergirding this scholarship. We will trace the origins of contemporary critical/cultural studies of the media to Marxian concepts of ideology before following the development of these ideas through various schools of thought, illustrating how the field has grown more diverse and complex over time. The course will provide a broad working knowledge of the main interventions in the field and the scholars whose work carved new trajectories. Students will develop a familiarity with key concepts, movements, and approaches to cultural and media studies.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
AMST 401-01 Research and Methods in American Studies
Instructor: Eric Vazquez
Course Description:
An integrative seminar focusing on the theory and methods of cultural analysis and interdisciplinary study. Students examine the origins, history, and current state of American studies, discuss relevant questions, and, in research projects, apply techniques of interdisciplinary study to a subject related to thematic concentration. Prerequisite: 303, Senior American studies major, or permission of the instructor.
1330:T   DENNY 315
AMST 500-01 Indigenous Futurism
Instructor: Nicholle Dragone
Course Description: