Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Trent Masiki
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies. This course is cross-listed as LALC 121.
1500:TR   ALTHSE 207
AFST 220-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 256-01. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
AFST 220-02 African American Influences in U.S. Afro-Latino Literature
Instructor: Trent Masiki
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 222-02. This course examines African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes in U.S. Afro-Latino memoirs and autobiographical fiction. The course highlights Afro-Latino agency, resistance, endurance, intertextuality, and interracial alliances. Students will learn about the relationships between transculturation, panethnicity and ethnoracial identity formation in the U.S.
1030:TR   DANA 202
AFST 220-03 Double Jeopardy: African American Women and Protest Politics
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-02 and WGSS 202-02. This class explores African American womens relationships to various social movements throughout the twentieth century. African American women were key leaders and pioneers of a number of significant social movements in the US including the clubwomens movement, the Harlem Renaissance, and the civil rights movement. Yet they often found themselves excluded from white-dominated protest groups, for instance within the suffrage movement. This class will explore the ways in which African American women maneuvered around and in spite of these exclusions and created some of the most powerful critiques, organizations, texts and protest tactics of the twentieth century. Key movements that we will explore include the clubwomens movement, the Harlem Renaissance, civil rights and Black Power, welfare rights and womens liberation.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
AFST 220-04 The Civil Rights Movement: North and South
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-03. The post-World War II movement for African Americans civil rights is often consider solely in terms of Southern-based groups and events. This class will explode the myth that the civil rights movement was confined to the South by exploring the national character of inequalities, segregation and the movement for black freedom. With special attention to the years 1945-1975, this class will consider how segregation formed differently in Birmingham versus Alabama, how the fight for school de-segregation included battles in both Little Rock and New York, and how gender shaped protest politics and tactics of the movement across the nation. Key topics will include Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and ideas of leadership; key campaigns in Birmingham, New York, Detroit and elsewhere; important groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and how ideas about masculinity and femininity shaped the movement.
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
AFST 220-05 Race, Ethnicity, and Hybridity
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-04.This course examines the constructions, lived experiences and politics of race, ethnicity and hybridity. The course will explore the historical evolution of the concept of race, the ways in which race and ethnicity are overlapping classification categories that are embedded in relations of power, and the social, cultural and biological outcomes of extended contact and mixture. Whereas the majority of scholarship on race and ethnicity considers the dynamics of these social scientific categories and processes of formation through the lens of interactions between a dominant group (usually occupying the racial category of white) and a subordinated or minoritized group (usually racialized as black or brown), this course shifts the gaze to the politics of race and ethnicity between historically oppressed ethnic groupsthose of African ethnic origin and those of various Asian ethnicities. Using case studies mainly from the Caribbean, but also from the US and Africa, we will examine the anthropological, sociological, literary, musical and filmic documentation and analyses of Afro/Asian mixture and will explore how racial identities, interethnic relations, gender, sexuality, religious practices, politics, and festivity have been influenced by mixing and creolizing processes.
1330:TR   DANA 202
AFST 220-06 Introduction to Francophone Cultures
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 246-01.This course explores the relationship between literature and Francophone cultures (Vietnam, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa). Topics include: "Ngritude," the negro-African identity, "cultural mtissage," the status of women, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, and post-colonial disillusionment. Historical overview of the international context of Francophonie will be examined through short stories, novels, poems, critical essays, feature and documentary films.
1500:MR   BOSLER 319
AFST 220-09 Queerness in Blackness
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 202-03.This course is an interdisciplinary survey of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ), and same gender loving (SGL) culture and politics. We will first review some key concepts in Black feminism since these theorists and activists have made uninvited interventions in Black (cultural) politics, which paved the way for Black critical cultural theory and methodology. We will then survey key texts and concepts of major nodes of Black LGBTQ social formation and intellectual production, exploring concepts such as intersectionality, normativity, respectability, and articulation, to name a few. Lastly, the course will facilitate the critical, close readings of various scholarly and popular texts, including writings, films, and visual art.
1030:MWF   DENNY 212
AFST 220-10 Visualizing Blackness
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-06.In his introduction to The Matter of Images, Richard Dyer argues that, how social groups are treated in cultural representation is part and parcel of how they are treated in life, that poverty, harassment, self-hate and discrimination are shored up and instituted by representation (1). Images are imbedded with arguments about national identity and the social body. In this course, we will construct a vocabulary for reading images and consider how the representation of people of African descent in the United States shapes important cultural narratives. To help guide our course, we will look at several key historical moments when those narratives were in formation and issues of representation were greatly debated.
1130:MWF   DENNY 212
AFST 220-11 Religions of Africa
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Karegeye
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RELG 210-01.
1330:TF   EASTC 301
AFST 320-01 Cold War in Africa 1945-1990
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 370-01 and INST 290-05. Even as the nuclear deterrent kept Europe and North America largely free of warfare after 1945, Cold War rivals fought proxy wars across Africa. This course examines the Cold War calculations of the superpowers and others in the region and assesses the overlapping objectives and interests of African nationalists, white settlers, and decolonizing empires. After an examination of Cold War history and an assessment of Africas historical development, we will focus on case studies: Guinea, The Congo, Angola,Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, and South Africa. The course ends with an analysis of U.S., Soviet, Cuban, and African interpretations of how the Cold War impacted Africa(ns).
1500:TF   DENNY 303
AFST 320-02 African American Cultural Engagement with Cuba, 1859-1959
Instructor: Trent Masiki
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-02.Part of the Cuban Mini-Mosaic.This course examines the history and politics of African American travel to Cuba from 1859 to 1960. Imagined accounts of African American travel to Cuba begin with Martin R. Delanys novel Blake (1859) while actual African American travel to Cuba goes back at least as far as the Spanish-American War of 1898 and has continued unabated ever since. The history of African American travel to Cuba includes figures like Booker T. Washington, Langston Hughes, Rayford Logan, Mary McLeod Bethune, Sue Bailey Thurman, W. E. B. Du Bois, Irene Diggs, Joe Louis, and Amiri Baraka. In addition to the readings, students will listen to various podcasts, songs, and guest lecturers and watch relevant videos, documentaries, and films. Participation in the May 21-28, 2018 trip to Cuba will be open to anyone taking this class. MetaMovments will be organizing the trip with a focus on developing an historical understanding of the African influence on Cuban culture and life over several Centuries; engaging with academics & historians, specializing in the multiple branches of Afro-Cuban ancestry: Yoruba, Congo, Arara, and Abakua, as well as strong Haitian & Jamaican traditions; and being immersed in the dance and music of the island, from the Afro-Cuban roots to the Salsa of today. Students will be have the opportunity to practice Afro-Cuban music and dance with groups like Raices Profundo. After engagement with the history and politics of African American cultural exchange with Cuba and Cubans from 1859 to 1960, students will be able to reflect on their own experiences while in Cuba.
1330:W   ALTHSE 207
AFST 400-01 Writing in Africana Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
This course will build on experiences in the methods course. Students in this course continue research toward and writing of a senior thesis. The emphasis is on writing skills and course material; assignments link those skills to work in Africana Studies. Seniors in the major will work independently with the director of Africana Studies and a second faculty reader (representing a discipline closer to the senior's interest) to produce a lengthy paper or special project which focuses on an issue relevant to the student's concentration. Under the direction of the director of Africana Studies, students will meet collectively two or three times during the semester with the directors (and, if possible, other Africana Studies core and contributing faculty) to share bibliographies, research data, early drafts, and the like. This group will also meet at the end of the semester to discuss and evaluate final papers and projects. Prerequisites: 100 and 200; four 200/300-level AFST approved courses (2 Africa, 2 Diaspora); three 300-level (in area of concentration).
1330:M   ALTHSE 207
AFST 500-01 Migration and Art
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-02 Prisons and Punishment in American Society
Instructor: Marisol LeBron
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-01. The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. More than two million men and women are currently locked up behind bars, a population constituting roughly one in every one hundred American adults. What has led to this phenomenon of mass incarceration in the United States? This interdisciplinary course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors that have resulted in the growth of the prison system in American society. We will examine how race, class, education, gender, and sexuality shape the American legal system and impact the demography of prisons. We will also pay special attention to the intersections between the growth of for-profit prisons, the increasing criminalization of low-level drug offenses, and the rise of zero tolerance policing. We will conclude the course by considering alternatives to the current prison system and debate whether we can envision a world without prisons. This course will analyze a wide range of texts including, scholarly monographs, prison writings, documentaries, zines, and photographs. Readings for this course will include Michelle Alexanders The New Jim Crow, Sabrina Jones and Marc Mauers graphic novel Race to Incarcerate, and Angela Davis Are Prisons Obsolete?
1500:MR   DENNY 303
AMST 200-03 Black and Latinx Intersections
Instructor: Marisol LeBron
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-03. As Latinx population growth outpaced African American population growth over the course of the 2000s, a discourse of conflict and competition between the two groups started to take center stage. Scholars, journalists, and pundits argued that the new status of Latinxs as the majority minority population in the United States would diminish Black political and economic power and further exacerbate tensions between African American and Latinx groups. This course troubles sensationalistic accounts of Black and Latinx conflict by focusing on what interactions between African Americans and Latinx groups illuminate about race and power relations in the United States. We will focus special attention on the history of coalitional organizing between African American and Latinx groups, as well as the ways that Afro-Latinxs challenge narrow understandings of both Blackness and Latinidad. Ultimately, students will learn about the shifting history of racial power relations in the United States and the coalitional efforts undertaken by marginalized groups in order to affect social change.
1030:TR   DENNY 110
AMST 200-06 Visualizing Blackness
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-10.In his introduction to The Matter of Images, Richard Dyer argues that, how social groups are treated in cultural representation is part and parcel of how they are treated in life, that poverty, harassment, self-hate and discrimination are shored up and instituted by representation (1). Images are imbedded with arguments about national identity and the social body. In this course, we will construct a vocabulary for reading images and consider how the representation of people of African descent in the United States shapes important cultural narratives. To help guide our course, we will look at several key historical moments when those narratives were in formation and issues of representation were greatly debated.
1130:MWF   DENNY 212
AMST 303-01 The America that Race Built
Instructor: J Cotten Seiler
Course Description:
This course examines the origins and histories of the concept of race in the United States. Beginning with a discussion of the concept of race and proceeding through the histories of various groups, we will examine how race interacts with other categories of identitysuch as ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and nationalityin the everyday life of the nation past and present. Through we will rely on histories and social-scientific work to develop an understanding of how difference and diversity have been lived in America, we will also focus on how popular culture (such as film, television, popular music, and sports) and literature have shaped and continue to shaperightly or wronglythe way we see one another. This course fulfills the AMST major theory requirement.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 256-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 222-02 African American Influences in U.S. Afro-Latino Literature
Instructor: Trent Masiki
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. This course examines African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes in U.S. Afro-Latino memoirs and autobiographical fiction. The course highlights Afro-Latino agency, resistance, endurance, intertextuality, and interracial alliances. Students will learn about the relationships between transculturation, panethnicity and ethnoracial identity formation in the U.S.
1030:TR   DANA 202
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 246-01 Introduction to Francophone Cultures
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06. This course explores the relationship between literature and Francophone cultures (Vietnam, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa). Topics include: "Ngritude," the negro-African identity, "cultural mtissage," the status of women, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, and post-colonial disillusionment. Historical overview of the international context of Francophonie will be examined through short stories, novels, poems, critical essays, feature and documentary films. Prerequisite: 236.
1500:MR   BOSLER 319
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-02 Double Jeopardy: African American Women and Protest Politics
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and WGSS 202-02. This class explores African American womens relationships to various social movements throughout the twentieth century. African American women were key leaders and pioneers of a number of significant social movements in the US including the clubwomens movement, the Harlem Renaissance, and the civil rights movement. Yet they often found themselves excluded from white-dominated protest groups, for instance within the suffrage movement. This class will explore the ways in which African American women maneuvered around and in spite of these exclusions and created some of the most powerful critiques, organizations, texts and protest tactics of the twentieth century. Key movements that we will explore include the clubwomens movement, the Harlem Renaissance, civil rights and Black Power, welfare rights and womens liberation.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
HIST 211-03 The Civil Rights Movement: North and South
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04. The post-World War II movement for African Americans civil rights is often consider solely in terms of Southern-based groups and events. This class will explode the myth that the civil rights movement was confined to the South by exploring the national character of inequalities, segregation and the movement for black freedom. With special attention to the years 1945-1975, this class will consider how segregation formed differently in Birmingham versus Alabama, how the fight for school de-segregation included battles in both Little Rock and New York, and how gender shaped protest politics and tactics of the movement across the nation. Key topics will include Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and ideas of leadership; key campaigns in Birmingham, New York, Detroit and elsewhere; important groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and how ideas about masculinity and femininity shaped the movement.
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
HIST 370-01 Cold War in Africa 1945-1990
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and INST 290-05. Even as the nuclear deterrent kept Europe and North America largely free of warfare after 1945, Cold War rivals fought proxy wars across Africa. This course examines the Cold War calculations of the superpowers and others in the region and assesses the overlapping objectives and interests of African nationalists, white settlers, and decolonizing empires. After an examination of Cold War history and an assessment of Africas historical development, we will focus on case studies: Guinea, The Congo, Angola, Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, and South Africa. The course ends with an analysis of U.S., Soviet, Cuban, and African interpretations of how the Cold War impacted Africa(ns).
1500:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in INST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 290-05 Cold War in Africa 1945-1990
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and HIST 370-01. Even as the nuclear deterrent kept Europe and North America largely free of warfare after 1945, Cold War rivals fought proxy wars across Africa. This course examines the Cold War calculations of the superpowers and others in the region and assesses the overlapping objectives and interests of African nationalists, white settlers, and decolonizing empires. After an examination of Cold War history and an assessment of Africas historical development, we will focus on case studies: Guinea, The Congo, Angola,Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, and South Africa. The course ends with an analysis of U.S., Soviet, Cuban, and African interpretations of how the Cold War impacted Africa(ns).
1500:TF   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 121-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Trent Masiki
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 100-01. This interdisciplinary introduction to Africana Studies combines teaching foundational texts in the field with instruction in critical reading and writing. The course will cover Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade, the creation of African Disaporic communities, the conceptualization and representation of Black culture and identity, and the intellectual and institutional development of Black and Africana Studies.This course is cross-listed as AFST 100.
1500:TR   ALTHSE 207
LALC 200-02 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-08, MUAC 210-02 and PORT 380-02. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1500:TF   WEISS 212
LALC 200-03 Black and Latinx Intersections
Instructor: Marisol LeBron
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-03. As Latinx population growth outpaced African American population growth over the course of the 2000s, a discourse of conflict and competition between the two groups started to take center stage. Scholars, journalists, and pundits argued that the new status of Latinxs as the majority minority population in the United States would diminish Black political and economic power and further exacerbate tensions between African American and Latinx groups. This course troubles sensationalistic accounts of Black and Latinx conflict by focusing on what interactions between African Americans and Latinx groups illuminate about race and power relations in the United States. We will focus special attention on the history of coalitional organizing between African American and Latinx groups, as well as the ways that Afro-Latinxs challenge narrow understandings of both Blackness and Latinidad. Ultimately, students will learn about the shifting history of racial power relations in the United States and the coalitional efforts undertaken by marginalized groups in order to affect social change.
1030:TR   DENNY 110
LALC 200-04 Race, Ethnicity, and Hybridity
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05.This course examines the constructions, lived experiences and politics of race, ethnicity and hybridity. The course will explore the historical evolution of the concept of race, the ways in which race and ethnicity are overlapping classification categories that are embedded in relations of power, and the social, cultural and biological outcomes of extended contact and mixture. Whereas the majority of scholarship on race and ethnicity considers the dynamics of these social scientific categories and processes of formation through the lens of interactions between a dominant group (usually occupying the racial category of white) and a subordinated or minoritized group (usually racialized as black or brown), this course shifts the gaze to the politics of race and ethnicity between historically oppressed ethnic groupsthose of African ethnic origin and those of various Asian ethnicities. Using case studies mainly from the Caribbean, but also from the US and Africa, we will examine the anthropological, sociological, literary, musical and filmic documentation and analyses of Afro/Asian mixture and will explore how racial identities, interethnic relations, gender, sexuality, religious practices, politics, and festivity have been influenced by mixing and creolizing processes.
1330:TR   DANA 202
LALC 300-02 African American Cultural Engagement with Cuba, 1859-1959
Instructor: Trent Masiki
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02. Part of Cuban Mini-Mosaic.This course examines the history and politics of African American travel to Cuba from 1859 to 1960. Imagined accounts of African American travel to Cuba begin with Martin R. Delanys novel Blake (1859) while actual African American travel to Cuba goes back at least as far as the Spanish-American War of 1898 and has continued unabated ever since. The history of African American travel to Cuba includes figures like Booker T. Washington, Langston Hughes, Rayford Logan, Mary McLeod Bethune, Sue Bailey Thurman, W. E. B. Du Bois, Irene Diggs, Joe Louis, and Amiri Baraka. In addition to the readings, students will listen to various podcasts, songs, and guest lecturers and watch relevant videos, documentaries, and films. Participation in the May 21-28, 2018 trip to Cuba will be open to anyone taking this class. MetaMovments will be organizing the trip with a focus on developing an historical understanding of the African influence on Cuban culture and life over several Centuries; engaging with academics & historians, specializing in the multiple branches of Afro-Cuban ancestry: Yoruba, Congo, Arara, and Abakua, as well as strong Haitian & Jamaican traditions; and being immersed in the dance and music of the island, from the Afro-Cuban roots to the Salsa of today. Students will be have the opportunity to practice Afro-Cuban music and dance with groups like Raices Profundo. After engagement with the history and politics of African American cultural exchange with Cuba and Cubans from 1859 to 1960, students will be able to reflect on their own experiences while in Cuba.
1330:W   ALTHSE 207
Courses Offered in MUAC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MUAC 210-02 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-08, LALC 200-01 and PORT 380-02. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1500:TF   WEISS 212
Courses Offered in PORT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 380-02 Lusomusics
Instructor: Lila Ellen Gray
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-08, LALC 200-02 and MUAC 210-02. This course investigates select musical genres and soundscapes in 20th-21st century Portugal, Cape Verde, Angola, and Brazil as a lens into understanding four national cultures interlinked through a common language, geographical positioning in relation to the Atlantic ocean, and histories of Portuguese colonialism. Working with a wide range of case studies, from urban and popular music genres, to revivals of traditional music and dance, to newly emergent expressive forms, Lusomusics uses musical ethnographies, histories, and sound and video recordings as the materials through which to think about colonialism/post-colonialism, culture, musical circulation, and contact. Likewise, this course introduces students to the analytic tools to think critically about the production and packaging of lusomusics and their histories for international markets for world music.
1500:TF   WEISS 212
Courses Offered in RELG
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 210-01 Religions of Africa
Instructor: Jean-Pierre Karegeye
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-11. The course examines the variety of religious experiences, traditions, and representations of religion in African cultures. These include indigenous religions, Islam, Christianity and syncretistic traditions. We will examine the various roles that religion plays in responding to current crises facing African cultures, including HIV/AIDS pandemic, political conflicts, and issues related to gender (e.g., girls' education, shifting perspectives on masculinity and femininity) that have been shaped by religious attitudes. Students will use novels, memoir and film to supplement scholarly readings.
1330:TF   EASTC 301
Courses Offered in SOCI
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
SOCI 230-01 Prisons and Punishment in American Society
Instructor: Marisol LeBron
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-02. The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. More than two million men and women are currently locked up behind bars, a population constituting roughly one in every one hundred American adults. What has led to this phenomenon of mass incarceration in the United States? This interdisciplinary course will examine the historical, political, economic, and social factors that have resulted in the growth of the prison system in American society. We will examine how race, class, education, gender, and sexuality shape the American legal system and impact the demography of prisons. We will also pay special attention to the intersections between the growth of for-profit prisons, the increasing criminalization of low-level drug offenses, and the rise of zero tolerance policing. We will conclude the course by considering alternatives to the current prison system and debate whether we can envision a world without prisons. This course will analyze a wide range of texts including, scholarly monographs, prison writings, documentaries, zines, and photographs. Readings for this course will include Michelle Alexanders The New Jim Crow, Sabrina Jones and Marc Mauers graphic novel Race to Incarcerate, and Angela Davis Are Prisons Obsolete?
1500:MR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 202-02 Double Jeopardy: African American Women and Protest Politics
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and HIST 211-02. This class explores African American womens relationships to various social movements throughout the twentieth century. African American women were key leaders and pioneers of a number of significant social movements in the US including the clubwomens movement, the Harlem Renaissance, and the civil rights movement. Yet they often found themselves excluded from white-dominated protest groups, for instance within the suffrage movement. This class will explore the ways in which African American women maneuvered around and in spite of these exclusions and created some of the most powerful critiques, organizations, texts and protest tactics of the twentieth century. Key movements that we will explore include the clubwomens movement, the Harlem Renaissance, civil rights and Black Power, welfare rights and womens liberation.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
WGSS 202-03 Queerness in Blackness
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-09.This course is an interdisciplinary survey of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ), and same gender loving (SGL) culture and politics. We will first review some key concepts in Black feminism since these theorists and activists have made uninvited interventions in Black (cultural) politics, which paved the way for Black critical cultural theory and methodology. We will then survey key texts and concepts of major nodes of Black LGBTQ social formation and intellectual production, exploring concepts such as intersectionality, normativity, respectability, and articulation, to name a few. Lastly, the course will facilitate the critical, close readings of various scholarly and popular texts, including writings, films, and visual art.Cross-listed with AMST 200-05.
1030:MWF   DENNY 212