Fall 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 200-01 Approaches to Africana Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-02.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 07
AFST 220-01 Get Up, Stand Up! Bob Marley as Artist and Activist
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-01.This course situates reggae superstar Bob Marley within a larger framework of artist/activists, Pan-Africanists, and postcolonial revolutionary figures. The face of Bob Marley is emblazoned on T-shirts sold in mainstream department stores, and figures prominently on posters and textiles that adorn American college students dorm rooms. His music is celebrated in regions as diverse as the UK, Japan, New Zealand, and Tanzania. Were all familiar with commercials promoting tourism in Jamaica that feature Bob Marleys track, One Love. Less familiar is the history of Bob Marleythe socio-political environment in which he was raised, the cultures that shaped his music, the historical figures that influenced his ideology and politics, the development and nature of his spirituality, and the commodification of his image in transnational global markets. These are among the issues that will be explored in this course. Bob Marley is a cultural icon whose music continues to have a significant impact on the development of postcolonial and counter-hegemonic consciousness, artistic production, and activism in the Caribbean, Africa, Britain, and the US. The course will introduce students to scholarly and popular writing about, as well as filmic representations of, Bob Marleys life, art, and politics.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 110
AFST 220-02 African American Foodways
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This course examines the multifarious ways in which food has influenced the expressions of African American identity and culture. We will begin with a discussion of food as a cultural connector that preserves the ties between African Americans and their African antecedents. Subsequently, we will consider specific African American culinary practices and the origins of soul food. Additionally, we will analyze the roles of food in African American social activism. In so doing, we will pay particular attention to the relationships that exist among food consumption, human rights, and African American communal health, as represented by the anti-soul food and black vegetarianism/veganism movements.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 110
AFST 220-03 Ethnography of Postcolonial Africa
Instructor: Summer Wood
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 230-01.This course is intended as both an introduction to the ethnography of Africa and an examination of postcolonial situations in Africa. We will learn a great deal about the cultural, social, political, and economic diversity of the continent while avoiding the typological thinking that once characterized area studies. Through ethnography we will learn about African cultures, their historical contingencies, and their entanglements in various fields of power. We will assess the changing influences of pre-colonial traditions, colonialism, postcolonial states, and the global economy.
1230:MWF   DENNY 313
AFST 220-04 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 274-01.Part of the Race and Education MosaicThe peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa in the early 1990s was widely hailed the South African Miracle. This course asks why such a transition should be considered miraculous. In order to answer our question, we will begin with South African independence from Britain in 1910 and study the evolution of legalized segregation and the introduction in 1948 of apartheid. After reviewing opposition movements we will move to a discussion of the demise of apartheid and the negotiated political order that took its place. We will examine the machinery and the deliberations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and debate its accomplishments. The course ends with an examination of memory and history. This story, and the individual stories of thousands of South Africans, will explain why today South Africa is in the words of Irish poet Seamus Heaney a place where hope and history rhyme.
1330:TF   DENNY 311
AFST 220-05 Sex and the City: Gender, Politics, and Culture in 20th Century Urban America
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-01.In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which the gendered city reflects complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation. The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.
1500:MR   DENNY 313
AFST 220-06 African Americans Since Slavery
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 273-01.Focuses on the history of Americans of African ancestry in the years following the American Civil War, which ended in 1865. The course examines several important transformations of African Americans as a people. In the first, we consider the transition from slavery to a nominal but highly circumscribed "freedom," which ended with the destruction of Reconstruction governments in the South. We consider the institution-building and community-building processes among African Americans, and the development of distinctive elite and folk cultures among various classes of black people. We examine the Great Migration north and west between 1900 and 1920, and the urbanization of what had been a predominately rural people. Fifth, we consider the differential impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and the New Deal and World War II on African Americans, and the creation of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's - 1980's.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
AFST 220-07 African Government & Politics
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 252-01.An introduction to the politics of contemporary, sub-Saharan Africa. After analyzing the historical and socio-economic context of African politics, the course examines a number of contrasting political systems in depth. The final section of the course discusses the current problems of South Africa from an international perspective.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
AFST 320-01 Africana Women's Lives
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-03.In Women in Africa and the African Diaspora, Rosalyn Terborg-Penn posits, An important reason for the study of women of African descent throughout the world is the common nature of their struggles, the similar ways they deal with the problems and joys in their lives. This course will therefore examine the common and diverse life experiences of Africana women. We will discuss such issues as self-definition, womanhood, sexuality, activism, class, and community. Also, we will consider the theories of Black and African feminisms, as well as Africana womanism.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109
AFST 320-02 (Dis)Figuring the Black Body
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This course will examine the disparate socio-political values and meanings assigned to the black body, historically and contemporarily. Throughout the term, students will engage with a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives and source materials that specifically engage with discourses of black bodily difference (gender, age, able-bodiedness, and weight), usefulness (labor, medical experimentation, and athleticism), and beauty (hair and fashion). Ultimately, we will come to understand the ways in which black bodies have served not only as sites of cultural memory and trauma, but also as signifiers of black cultural pride and resiliency.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 204
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 230-01 Ethnography of Postcolonial Africa
Instructor: Summer Wood
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03.
1230:MWF   DENNY 313
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 246-01 Introduction to Francophone Cultures
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
This course explores the relationship between literature and Francophone cultures (Vietnam, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa). Topics include: "Ngritude," the negro-African identity, "cultural mtissage," the status of women, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, and post-colonial disillusionment. Historical overview of the international context of Francophonie will be examined through short stories, novels, poems, critical essays, feature and documentary films. Prerequisite: 236. This course fulfills the Humanities (Division I B) distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.
1500:MR   BOSLER 313
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-01 Sex and the City: Gender, Politics, and Culture in 20th Century Urban America
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05.In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which the gendered city reflects complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation. The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.
1500:MR   DENNY 313
HIST 273-01 African Americans Since Slavery
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
HIST 274-01 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04.Part of the Race and Education Mosaic.
1330:TF   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 200-01 Get Up, Stand Up! Bob Marley as Artist and Activist
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01.This course situates reggae superstar Bob Marley within a larger framework of artist/activists, Pan-Africanists, and postcolonial revolutionary figures. The face of Bob Marley is emblazoned on T-shirts sold in mainstream department stores, and figures prominently on posters and textiles that adorn American college students dorm rooms. His music is celebrated in regions as diverse as the UK, Japan, New Zealand, and Tanzania. Were all familiar with commercials promoting tourism in Jamaica that feature Bob Marleys track, One Love. Less familiar is the history of Bob Marleythe socio-political environment in which he was raised, the cultures that shaped his music, the historical figures that influenced his ideology and politics, the development and nature of his spirituality, and the commodification of his image in transnational global markets. These are among the issues that will be explored in this course. Bob Marley is a cultural icon whose music continues to have a significant impact on the development of postcolonial and counter-hegemonic consciousness, artistic production, and activism in the Caribbean, Africa, Britain, and the US. The course will introduce students to scholarly and popular writing about, as well as filmic representations of, Bob Marleys life, art, and politics.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 252-01 African Government & Politics
Instructor: J Mark Ruhl
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-07.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
Courses Offered in WGST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGST 300-03 Africana Women's Lives
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01.In Women in Africa and the African Diaspora, Rosalyn Terborg-Penn posits, An important reason for the study of women of African descent throughout the world is the common nature of their struggles, the similar ways they deal with the problems and joys in their lives. This course will therefore examine the common and diverse life experiences of Africana women. We will discuss such issues as self-definition, womanhood, sexuality, activism, class, and community. Also, we will consider the theories of Black and African feminisms, as well as Africana womanism.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 109