Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01.
1130:MWF   ALTHSE 08
AFST 220-02 Sex and the City: Gender, Politics, and Culture in 20th Century Urban America
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-02. In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which the gendered city reflects complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation. The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
AFST 220-03 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-01 and AMST 200-03. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. In the class, we will analyze key people, issues, events and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power. Throughout the semester, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
AFST 220-06 Race, Ethnicity, and Hybridity
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-03.This course examines the constructions, lived experiences and politics of race, ethnicity and hybridity. The course will explore the historical evolution of the concept of race, the ways in which race and ethnicity are overlapping classification categories that are embedded in relations of power, and the social, cultural and biological outcomes of extended contact and mixture. Whereas the majority of scholarship on race and ethnicity considers the dynamics of these social scientific categories and processes of formation through the lens of interactions between a dominant group (usually occupying the racial category of white) and a subordinated or minoritized group (usually racialized as black or brown), this course shifts the gaze to the politics of race and ethnicity between historically oppressed ethnic groupsthose of African ethnic origin and those of various Asian ethnicities. Using case studies mainly from the Caribbean, but also from the US and Africa, we will examine the anthropological, sociological, literary, musical and filmic documentation and analyses of Afro/Asian mixture and will explore how racial identities, interethnic relations, gender, sexuality, religious practices, politics, and festivity have been influenced by mixing and creolizing processes.
1330:W   ALTHSE 08
AFST 220-07 The Harlem Renaissance
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-04.This introductory course focuses on the Harlem Renaissance which is sometimes referred to as the New Negro Renaissance. The course will study the history and politics of the Harlem Renaissance--roughly a period from 1915-1940. Students will be introduced to the historical background of the Harlem Renaissance as well as the major intellectual, racial, political, and social issues of this period in American, Caribbean, and African American cultural history. Through consideration of literature, art, and music, the course probes the impetus behind, meaning, and legacy of the period describe as the Harlem Renaissance.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
AFST 310-01 The Anthropology of Music in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 345-01 and LALC 300-01. Artists as individuals have had a tremendous impact on the lives of Caribbean people. Yet, in the Caribbean, the arts are as much a community enterprise as they are an individualistic endeavor. This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought and culture through artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Through the use of specific case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we will interrogate salient themes in the academic literature of the region, such as agency, empowerment, self-affirmation, hegemony, resistance, and identity. We will seek to unravel how attention to musical production helps us to define the region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Through ethnographies and other critical readings, films and musical examples, we will look at how individuals and groups in the Caribbean have used artistic expression to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups (or polarize communities), resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:R   ALTHSE 109
AFST 320-01 Contemporary African American Novels
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 375-01. This course examines the intersectional politics of race, class, and gender that are expressed and problematized in twenty-first century African-American novels. Over the course of the semester, we will consider the ways in which these politics not only shape African-Americans individual and communal consciousness within the texts, but also how they inform the construction of the narrative proper. Moreover, we will discuss the historical, social, and political milieus of the novels in order to deepen our understandings of the Black experience in the United States. Our analyses will be based on selected works that range from historical narratives to science fiction and are composed by authors Toni Morrison, Victor LaValle, Bernice McFadden, Colson Whitehead, Tayari Jones, Daniel Black, as well as Tananarive Due.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 07
AFST 320-02 Ecological History of Africa
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 373-01.This course provides an introduction to the ecological history of Africa. We will focus in some detail on demography, the domestication of crops and animals, climate, the spread of New World crops (maize, cassava, cocoa), and disease environments from the earliest times to the present. Central to our study will be the idea that Africa's landscapes are the product of human action. Therefore, we will examine case studies of how people have interacted with their environments. African ecology has long been affected indirectly by decisions made at a global scale. Thus we will explore Africa's engagement with imperialism and colonization and the global economy in the twentieth century. The course ends with an examination of contemporary tensions between conservation and economic development.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
AFST 320-04 Frederick Douglass to Barack Obama: African American Intellectual History
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 311-02. This writing intensive class will examine African American intellectuals and intellectual life from the mid-nineteenth century up until today. We will examine the lives and thought of a variety of African Americans, from political theorists, social scientists, philosophers and economists to social critics, novelists, artists, and activists. In the class, we will situate their ideas within broader historical contexts. By analyzing a wide range of texts, we will look at the issues that were most pressing to them: race and racism, the desire for self-expression, economic development, political representation, and social activism. Ultimately, the course aims to explore how African American intellectuals have contributed to our understanding of issues facing African Americans in the US and across the Diaspora.
1330:W   DENNY 204
AFST 400-01 Writing in Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This course will build on experiences in the methods course. Students in this course continue research toward and writing of a senior thesis. The emphasis is on writing skills and course material; assignments link those skills to work in Africana Studies. Seniors in the major will work independently with the director of Africana Studies and a second faculty reader (representing a discipline closer to the senior's interest) to produce a lengthy paper or special project which focuses on an issue relevant to the student's concentration. Under the direction of the director of Africana Studies, students will meet collectively two or three times during the semester with the directors (and, if possible, other Africana Studies core and contributing faculty) to share bibliographies, research data, early drafts, and the like. This group will also meet at the end of the semester to discuss and evaluate final papers and projects. Prerequisites: 100 and 200; four 200/300-level AFST approved courses (2 Africa, 2 Diaspora); three 300-level (in area of concentration).
1330:M   ALTHSE 07
AFST 400-02 Writing in Africana Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
This course will build on experiences in the methods course. Students in this course continue research toward and writing of a senior thesis. The emphasis is on writing skills and course material; assignments link those skills to work in Africana Studies. Seniors in the major will work independently with the director of Africana Studies and a second faculty reader (representing a discipline closer to the senior's interest) to produce a lengthy paper or special project which focuses on an issue relevant to the student's concentration. Under the direction of the director of Africana Studies, students will meet collectively two or three times during the semester with the directors (and, if possible, other Africana Studies core and contributing faculty) to share bibliographies, research data, early drafts, and the like. This group will also meet at the end of the semester to discuss and evaluate final papers and projects. Prerequisites: 100 and 200; four 200/300-level AFST approved courses (2 Africa, 2 Diaspora); three 300-level (in area of concentration).
1330:M   EASTC 107
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 101-04 The Harlem Renaissance
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-07.This introductory course focuses on the Harlem Renaissance which is sometimes referred to as the New Negro Renaissance. The course will study the history and politics of the Harlem Renaissance--roughly a period from 1915-1940. Students will be introduced to the historical background of the Harlem Renaissance as well as the major intellectual, racial, political, and social issues of this period in American, Caribbean, and African American cultural history. Through consideration of literature, art, and music, the course probes the impetus behind, meaning, and legacy of the period describe as the Harlem Renaissance.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
AMST 200-03 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and HIST 211-01. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. In the class, we will analyze key people, issues, events and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power. Throughout the semester, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 345-01 The Anthropology of Music in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 310-01 and LALC 300-01. Artists as individuals have had a tremendous impact on the lives of Caribbean people. Yet, in the Caribbean, the arts are as much a community enterprise as they are an individualistic endeavor. This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought and culture through artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Through the use of specific case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we will interrogate salient themes in the academic literature of the region, such as agency, empowerment, self-affirmation, hegemony, resistance, and identity. We will seek to unravel how attention to musical production helps us to define the region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Through ethnographies and other critical readings, films and musical examples, we will look at how individuals and groups in the Caribbean have used artistic expression to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups (or polarize communities), resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:R   ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 375-01 Contemporary African American Novels
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01. This course examines the intersectional politics of race, class, and gender that are expressed and problematized in twenty-first century African-American novels. Over the course of the semester, we will consider the ways in which these politics not only shape African-Americans individual and communal consciousness within the texts, but also how they inform the construction of the narrative proper. Moreover, we will discuss the historical, social, and political milieus of the novels in order to deepen our understandings of the Black experience in the United States. Our analyses will be based on selected works that range from historical narratives to science fiction and are composed by authors Toni Morrison, Victor LaValle, Bernice McFadden, Colson Whitehead, Tayari Jones, Daniel Black, as well as Tananarive Due.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 07
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 362-01 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-03 and WGST 300-02. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-01 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and AMST 200-03. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. In the class, we will analyze key people, issues, events and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power. Throughout the semester, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
HIST 211-02 Sex and the City: Gender, Politics, and Culture in 20th Century Urban America
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which the gendered city reflects complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation. The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 311-02 Frederick Douglass to Barack Obama: African American Intellectual History
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-04. This writing intensive class will examine African American intellectuals and intellectual life from the mid-nineteenth century up until today. We will examine the lives and thought of a variety of African Americans, from political theorists, social scientists, philosophers and economists to social critics, novelists, artists, and activists. In the class, we will situate their ideas within broader historical contexts. By analyzing a wide range of texts, we will look at the issues that were most pressing to them: race and racism, the desire for self-expression, economic development, political representation, and social activism. Ultimately, the course aims to explore how African American intellectuals have contributed to our understanding of issues facing African Americans in the US and across the Diaspora.
1330:W   DENNY 204
HIST 373-01 Ecological History of Africa
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 200-03 Race, Ethnicity, and Hybridity
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06.This course examines the constructions, lived experiences and politics of race, ethnicity and hybridity. The course will explore the historical evolution of the concept of race, the ways in which race and ethnicity are overlapping classification categories that are embedded in relations of power, and the social, cultural and biological outcomes of extended contact and mixture. Whereas the majority of scholarship on race and ethnicity considers the dynamics of these social scientific categories and processes of formation through the lens of interactions between a dominant group (usually occupying the racial category of white) and a subordinated or minoritized group (usually racialized as black or brown), this course shifts the gaze to the politics of race and ethnicity between historically oppressed ethnic groupsthose of African ethnic origin and those of various Asian ethnicities. Using case studies mainly from the Caribbean, but also from the US and Africa, we will examine the anthropological, sociological, literary, musical and filmic documentation and analyses of Afro/Asian mixture and will explore how racial identities, interethnic relations, gender, sexuality, religious practices, politics, and festivity have been influenced by mixing and creolizing processes.
1330:W   ALTHSE 08
LALC 300-01 The Anthropology of Music in the Caribbean
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 310-01 and ANTH 345-01. Artists as individuals have had a tremendous impact on the lives of Caribbean people. Yet, in the Caribbean, the arts are as much a community enterprise as they are an individualistic endeavor. This course explores the contours of Caribbean society, thought and culture through artistic expression, in general, and music, in particular. Through the use of specific case studies drawn from the Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean, we will interrogate salient themes in the academic literature of the region, such as agency, empowerment, self-affirmation, hegemony, resistance, and identity. We will seek to unravel how attention to musical production helps us to define the region and to understand the lives of the people who call it home. Through ethnographies and other critical readings, films and musical examples, we will look at how individuals and groups in the Caribbean have used artistic expression to write their own histories, preserve their spirituality, assert their unique identities, form alliances across groups (or polarize communities), resist oppressive regimes, build nations, and celebrate life.
1330:R   ALTHSE 109
LALC 300-03 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and WGST 300-02.Taught in French. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319
Courses Offered in WGST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGST 300-02 Prostitution & Sexuality in Haitian Literature & Film
Instructor: Linda Brindeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and LALC 300-03. Taught in French. The objective of this class is to help develop students understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on womens agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences financially, emotionally and socially of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?
1330:T   BOSLER 319