Spring 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 100-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
AFST 200-01 Approaches to Africana Studies
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-02.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
AFST 220-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 256-01. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
AFST 220-02 Marginalization & Representation
Instructor: Vanessa Tyson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-04. This course explores the political representation of groups that have historically been marginalized in American society and excluded from the democratic process either through statute or through common practices. In particular, issues of racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia will be addressed.
1330:W   DENNY 203
AFST 220-04 Black Americans and the Political System
Instructor: Vanessa Tyson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-03. This course will focus on how the continuing struggle for black empowerment has helped to shape both current American political environment as well as the social and economic conditions of the black community. While this course primarily focuses on the relationship between African-Americans and the US political system from WWII on, some attention is paid to the period of Reconstruction in order to lay a firm foundation for the analysis of modern black politics. The unique nature of African-American politics requires a multi-disciplinary approach to the subject. Consequently, materials and lectures will also show how the study of race relations, psychology, economics, and sociology can inform our understanding of the critical importance of black politics to American politics. After considering such topics as the rise of the civil rights movement and the governmental institutions, this course will conclude by contemplating the election of President Barack Obama and whether a New Black Politics has emerged, reflecting the entire nations move to the political right over the last three decades. This course is aimed at students who want to explore the idea of diversity and inclusion in the political process. How do structures within the public/political realm constrain Africa-Americans both in their immediate experiences and the longer legacy of racial inequality? It is expected that these tops will be given thorough analysis in class discussion that both societal and personal values will be explored and articulated by students, and that considerable thought will be given to the perpetuation of racial inequality in the United States.
1330:TR   DENNY 317
AFST 220-05 African History from Earliest Times to C. 1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 270-01. Africa lies at the heart of human history. It is the continent from which the distant ancestors of every one of us, no matter who we are today, originally came. Its peoples participated integrally in the great transformations of world history, from the first rise of agricultural ways of life to the various inventions of metal working to the growth and spread of global networks of commerce. Africans were vital participants and contributors to human developments in all ages. This is the story we will introduce you to in this course. The central themes of the class will be how people in Africa mastered and used the environments in which they lived, how they organized their societies in different periods and places, and how they changed and developed in the face of shifting historical circumstances. We will explore the ancient historical roots of the great cultural diversity of the continent. Among the topics and themes of history we will consider as we progress forward in time toward the eighteenth century will be agricultural developments, technology, social change, political growth of scale, urbanization, trade and commerce, religion, art and music.
0930:MWF   DENNY 311
AFST 220-06 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 274-01. The peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa in the early 1990s was widely hailed the South African Miracle. This course asks why such a transition should be considered miraculous. In order to answer our question, we will begin with South African independence from Britain in 1910 and study the evolution of legalized segregation and the introduction in 1948 of apartheid. After reviewing opposition movements we will move to a discussion of the demise of apartheid and the negotiated political order that took its place. We will examine the machinery and the deliberations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and debate its accomplishments. The course ends with an examination of memory and history. This story, and the individual stories of thousands of South Africans, will explain why today South Africa is in the words of Irish poet Seamus Heaney a place where hope and history rhyme.
1230:MWF   DENNY 311
AFST 220-07 Afro-Brazilian Culture
Instructor: Ramayana Lira de Sousa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PORT 380-01 and LALC 200-01.This course explores elements of Afro-Brazilian culture in multi-racial Brazil and how such elements impact and often define Brazilian society and culture as a whole. The contents are organized around topics that aim at showing the relationship between culture and politics and the intricate web woven in the interplay between Africa, Brazil and the world and the multifarious processes of hybridization.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 213
AFST 220-08 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-03 and AMST 200-02. The Black Liberation Movement in the United Statesalso known as the Civil Rights Movementoccurred between the 1930s and 1990. From the NAACP Legal Defense Funds legal campaign against segregated schools to the emergence of African American elected officials throughout the once-segregated South, black Americans carried out direct action protests, lawsuits, and political campaigns against restrictive laws and social customs. African Americans demanded the right to use public facilities, and to be granted the right to vote. Blacks also pushed states to arrest and try members of the Ku Klux Klan and other terrorist organizations that murdered African Americans during the movement years. Other issues addressed by movement activists include the American prison system, which incarcerates a disproportionate number of young black men. They also protested the conduct of police in numerous places, the rights of people on welfare and other public subsidies, and continuing efforts by some states to restrict voting rights. In this course, students will study the emergence of the Black Liberation Movement as a mass movement that successfully pressured the federal government to enact the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Students will read biographies, case studies, state histories, essays, and view film clips related to local and national events. Students will be required to write three small reflection papers, an annotated bibliography, and a take-home final.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
AFST 220-09 Black Sustainability in African Diasporic Literatures
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-08.This course will examine literary representations of social activism in predominately Black communities of the African Diaspora. Specifically, we will explore the ways in which historical and fictional Black communities fashioned distinct strategies for sustainable living despite the mainstream pressures of racism, exclusion, modernization, urban development, and forced and voluntary migration. In doing so, we will analyze the correlation between environmental and social sustainability by considering 1) the patterns of Black migration to secure economic opportunity and freedom from systemic oppression, 2) the physical topography and settings of the works, particularly asking why these locations were deemed feasible for black settlement and subsistence and 3) the direct impact that black communal living had on their survival and sense of communal connectedness. We will read novels and short stories by writers such as Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, George Schuyler, Jamaica Kincaid, Lawrence Hill, Edwidge Danticat, and Maryse Conde.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
AFST 220-10 Get Up, Stand Up! Bob Marley as Artist and Activist
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-03.This course situates reggae superstar Bob Marley within a larger framework of artist/activists, Pan-Africanists, and postcolonial revolutionary figures. The face of Bob Marley is emblazoned on T-shirts sold in mainstream department stores, and figures prominently on posters and textiles that adorn American college students dorm rooms. His music is celebrated in regions as diverse as the UK, Japan, New Zealand, and Tanzania. Were all familiar with commercials promoting tourism in Jamaica that feature Bob Marleys track, One Love. Less familiar is the history of Bob Marleythe socio-political environment in which he was raised, the cultures that shaped his music, the historical figures that influenced his ideology and politics, the development and nature of his spirituality, and the commodification of his image in transnational global markets. These are among the issues that will be explored in this course. Bob Marley is a cultural icon whose music continues to have a significant impact on the development of postcolonial and counter-hegemonic consciousness, artistic production, and activism in the Caribbean, Africa, Britain, and the US. The course will introduce students to scholarly and popular writing about, as well as filmic representations of, Bob Marleys life, art, and politics.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 201
AFST 235-01 Introduction to Caribbean Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 122-01.
1330:MR   BOSLER 307
AFST 320-01 Representation of the Black Power Revolution
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 300-05. This course will explore the ideologies and politics of Black Power as expressed in various writings, film, and music of the 1960s Civil Rights Era. We will consider such questions as: Which political circumstances gave birth to the Black Power Movement? What role did the Black Arts play in shaping the definition of black power? How did organizations such as SNCC, the Black Panther Party, US Organization, and the Nation of Islam influence articulations of black power? Who were the major voices of the movement? And, what led to the movement's decline? Moreover, we will determine the enduring legacy of the Black Power Movement and how this legacy continues to shape contemporary racial identity politics, discourses on gender, and discussions of black nationalism/ Pan-Africanism.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 106
AFST 400-01 Writing in Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This course will build on experiences in the methods course. Students in this course continue research toward and writing of a senior thesis. The emphasis is on writing skills and course material; assignments link those skills to work in Africana Studies. Seniors in the major will work independently with the director of Africana Studies and a second faculty reader (representing a discipline closer to the senior's interest) to produce a lengthy paper or special project which focuses on an issue relevant to the student's concentration. Under the direction of the director of Africana Studies, students will meet collectively two or three times during the semester with the directors (and, if possible, other Africana Studies core and contributing faculty) to share bibliographies, research data, early drafts, and the like. This group will also meet at the end of the semester to discuss and evaluate final papers and projects. Prerequisites: 100 and 200; four 200/300-level AFST approved courses (2 Africa, 2 Diaspora); three 300-level (in area of concentration).
1330:T   ALTHSE 07
AFST 500-01 African American Fiction/Fantasy Workshop
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-02 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 211-03 and AFST 220-08. The Black Liberation Movement in the United Statesalso known as the Civil Rights Movementoccurred between the 1930s and 1990. From the NAACP Legal Defense Funds legal campaign against segregated schools to the emergence of African American elected officials throughout the once-segregated South, black Americans carried out direct action protests, lawsuits, and political campaigns against restrictive laws and social customs. African Americans demanded the right to use public facilities, and to be granted the right to vote. Blacks also pushed states to arrest and try members of the Ku Klux Klan and other terrorist organizations that murdered African Americans during the movement years. Other issues addressed by movement activists include the American prison system, which incarcerates a disproportionate number of young black men. They also protested the conduct of police in numerous places, the rights of people on welfare and other public subsidies, and continuing efforts by some states to restrict voting rights. In this course, students will study the emergence of the Black Liberation Movement as a mass movement that successfully pressured the federal government to enact the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Students will read biographies, case studies, state histories, essays, and view film clips related to local and national events. Students will be required to write three small reflection papers, an annotated bibliography, and a take-home final.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
AMST 303-01 Cultural Theory of the Americas
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
The goals of the course are twofold. Firstly, to introduce students to cultural theory, emphasizing the history, theoretical foundations, and disciplinary boundaries that have shaped cultural theory and the study of culture. As such, we will set out to trace the history of the field and to map the debates, practices, and theories that have informed the political and intellectual project of cultural studies. Secondly, the course will develop students knowledge of and facility with various theoretical approaches and research methods informing the interdiscipline of American Studies. Drawing upon the fields of literature, womens and gender studies, history, critical race and ethnic studies, sociology, cultural anthropology, philosophy, cultural studies, and postcolonial and transnational studies, this course will be framed around three units: (1) Identity and Difference: Readings will introduces students to social movements, institutions, and theories relating to the rise of identities based on race, gender, ethnicity, class and sexuality; (2) Power and Resistance: Readings will focus on questions of power and resistance, this course examines theorists, mostly from the middle twentieth century to the twenty-first century, whose work has led to the study of revolutions and resistance movements and their centrality in cultural theory; (3) Movement and Displacement : Readings will focus on the genealogies of ideas of movement and settlement examining ways in which epistemologies of movement and displacement produce texts and contexts of knowledge formation. Seminar style,students will be expected to conduct close readings of theoretical texts and work to connect those texts to their own research interests.We will read primary works by Ferdinand de Saussure, Antonio Gramsci, Karl Marx, W.E.B. Dubois, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, Raymond Williams, Fernando Ortiz, Frantz Fanon, Mary Louise Pratt, Sylvia Wynter, Nstor Garca Canclini, Hayden White, Terry Eagleton, Robin D.G. Kelley, Paul Gilroy, Gayatri Spivak, Gloria Anzalda, Jos David Saldvar, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Edward Said, Edwidge Danticat, and Edouard Glissant, among others.
1500:MR   DENNY 204
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 256-01 Health and Healing in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01. This course addresses three interrelated aspects of health and healing in Africa. We examine health in Africa from a biomedical perspective, learning about disease, morbidity, mortality, and biomedical care. We place African health and health care into a framework of political economy, examining the causes and consequences of illness and disease and the forces that shape and constrain care. We also examine the cultural and historical dimensions of health and healing in specific regions of the continent, bringing ethnographic knowledge to bear on contemporary health problems and thereby gaining an understanding of the lived experiences of health and healing in Africa.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 101-08 Black Sustainability in African Diasporic Literatures
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-09.This course will examine literary representations of social activism in predominately Black communities of the African Diaspora. Specifically, we will explore the ways in which historical and fictional Black communities fashioned distinct strategies for sustainable living despite the mainstream pressures of racism, exclusion, modernization, urban development, and forced and voluntary migration. In doing so, we will analyze the correlation between environmental and social sustainability by considering 1) the patterns of Black migration to secure economic opportunity and freedom from systemic oppression, 2) the physical topography and settings of the works, particularly asking why these locations were deemed feasible for black settlement and subsistence and 3) the direct impact that black communal living had on their survival and sense of communal connectedness. We will read novels and short stories by writers such as Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, George Schuyler, Jamaica Kincaid, Lawrence Hill, Edwidge Danticat, and Maryse Conde.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 109
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 211-03 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-08 and AMST 200-02. The Black Liberation Movement in the United Statesalso known as the Civil Rights Movementoccurred between the 1930s and 1990. From the NAACP Legal Defense Funds legal campaign against segregated schools to the emergence of African American elected officials throughout the once-segregated South, black Americans carried out direct action protests, lawsuits, and political campaigns against restrictive laws and social customs. African Americans demanded the right to use public facilities, and to be granted the right to vote. Blacks also pushed states to arrest and try members of the Ku Klux Klan and other terrorist organizations that murdered African Americans during the movement years. Other issues addressed by movement activists include the American prison system, which incarcerates a disproportionate number of young black men. They also protested the conduct of police in numerous places, the rights of people on welfare and other public subsidies, and continuing efforts by some states to restrict voting rights. In this course, students will study the emergence of the Black Liberation Movement as a mass movement that successfully pressured the federal government to enact the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Students will read biographies, case studies, state histories, essays, and view film clips related to local and national events. Students will be required to write three small reflection papers, an annotated bibliography, and a take-home final.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
HIST 270-01 African History from Earliest Times to C. 1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05. Africa lies at the heart of human history. It is the continent from which the distant ancestors of every one of us, no matter who we are today, originally came. Its peoples participated integrally in the great transformations of world history, from the first rise of agricultural ways of life to the various inventions of metal working to the growth and spread of global networks of commerce. Africans were vital participants and contributors to human developments in all ages. This is the story we will introduce you to in this course. The central themes of the class will be how people in Africa mastered and used the environments in which they lived, how they organized their societies in different periods and places, and how they changed and developed in the face of shifting historical circumstances. We will explore the ancient historical roots of the great cultural diversity of the continent. Among the topics and themes of history we will consider as we progress forward in time toward the eighteenth century will be agricultural developments, technology, social change, political growth of scale, urbanization, trade and commerce, religion, art and music.
0930:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 274-01 The Rise and Fall of Apartheid
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06. The peaceful transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa in the early 1990s was widely hailed the South African Miracle. This course asks why such a transition should be considered miraculous. In order to answer our question, we will begin with South African independence from Britain in 1910 and study the evolution of legalized segregation and the introduction in 1948 of apartheid. After reviewing opposition movements we will move to a discussion of the demise of apartheid and the negotiated political order that took its place. We will examine the machinery and the deliberations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and debate its accomplishments. The course ends with an examination of memory and history. This story, and the individual stories of thousands of South Africans, will explain why today South Africa is in the words of Irish poet Seamus Heaney a place where hope and history rhyme.
1230:MWF   DENNY 311
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 121-01 Introduction to Africana Studies
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 100-01.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 08
LALC 122-01 Introduction to Caribbean Studies
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 235-01.
1330:MR   BOSLER 307
LALC 200-01 Afro-Brazilian Culture
Instructor: Ramayana Lira de Sousa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PORT 380-01 and AFST 220-07. This course explores elements of Afro-Brazilian culture in multi-racial Brazil and how such elements impact and often define Brazilian society and culture as a whole. The contents are organized around topics that aim at showing the relationship between culture and politics and the intricate web woven in the interplay between Africa, Brazil and the world and the multifarious processes of hybridization.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 213
LALC 200-02 Approaches to Africana Studies
Instructor: Jerry Philogene
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 200-01.This course will investigate the importance of conceptual analysis and the development of concepts in the theoretical and textual research of Africana Studies. Thus, the course will focus on various interpretive frameworks and approaches to organizing and understanding Africana Studies, including but not limited to the African model, Afrocentricity, diaspora model, critical race theory, post-modernism, and post colonialism.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
LALC 200-03 Get Up, Stand Up! Bob Marley as Artist and Activist
Instructor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-10.This course situates reggae superstar Bob Marley within a larger framework of artist/activists, Pan-Africanists, and postcolonial revolutionary figures. The face of Bob Marley is emblazoned on T-shirts sold in mainstream department stores, and figures prominently on posters and textiles that adorn American college students dorm rooms. His music is celebrated in regions as diverse as the UK, Japan, New Zealand, and Tanzania. Were all familiar with commercials promoting tourism in Jamaica that feature Bob Marleys track, One Love. Less familiar is the history of Bob Marleythe socio-political environment in which he was raised, the cultures that shaped his music, the historical figures that influenced his ideology and politics, the development and nature of his spirituality, and the commodification of his image in transnational global markets. These are among the issues that will be explored in this course. Bob Marley is a cultural icon whose music continues to have a significant impact on the development of postcolonial and counter-hegemonic consciousness, artistic production, and activism in the Caribbean, Africa, Britain, and the US. The course will introduce students to scholarly and popular writing about, as well as filmic representations of, Bob Marleys life, art, and politics.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 201
Courses Offered in PORT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PORT 380-01 Afro-Brazilian Culture
Instructor: Ramayana Lira de Sousa
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-07 and LALC 200-01. Taught in English. This course explores elements of Afro-Brazilian culture in multi-racial Brazil and how such elements impact and often define Brazilian society and culture as a whole. The contents are organized around topics that aim at showing the relationship between culture and politics and the intricate web woven in the interplay between Africa, Brazil and the world and the multifarious processes of hybridization.
1130:MWF   BOSLER 213
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 290-03 Black Americans and the Political System
Instructor: Vanessa Tyson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04. This course will focus on how the continuing struggle for black empowerment has helped to shape both current American political environment as well as the social and economic conditions of the black community. While this course primarily focuses on the relationship between African-Americans and the US political system from WWII on, some attention is paid to the period of Reconstruction in order to lay a firm foundation for the analysis of modern black politics. The unique nature of African-American politics requires a multi-disciplinary approach to the subject. Consequently, materials and lectures will also show how the study of race relations, psychology, economics, and sociology can inform our understanding of the critical importance of black politics to American politics. After considering such topics as the rise of the civil rights movement and the governmental institutions, this course will conclude by contemplating the election of President Barack Obama and whether a New Black Politics has emerged, reflecting the entire nations move to the political right over the last three decades. This course is aimed at students who want to explore the idea of diversity and inclusion in the political process. How do structures within the public/political realm constrain Africa-Americans both in their immediate experiences and the longer legacy of racial inequality? It is expected that these tops will be given thorough analysis in class discussion that both societal and personal values will be explored and articulated by students, and that considerable thought will be given to the perpetuation of racial inequality in the United States.
1330:TR   DENNY 317
POSC 290-04 Marginalization & Representation
Instructor: Vanessa Tyson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. This course explores the political representation of groups that have historically been marginalized in American society and excluded from the democratic process either through statute or through common practices. In particular, issues of racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia will be addressed.
1330:W   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in WGST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGST 300-05 Representation of the Black Power Revolution
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01. This course will explore the ideologies and politics of Black Power as expressed in various writings, film, and music of the 1960s Civil Rights Era. We will consider such questions as: Which political circumstances gave birth to the Black Power Movement? What role did the Black Arts play in shaping the definition of black power? How did organizations such as SNCC, the Black Panther Party, US Organization, and the Nation of Islam influence articulations of black power? Who were the major voices of the movement? And, what led to the movement's decline? Moreover, we will determine the enduring legacy of the Black Power Movement and how this legacy continues to shape contemporary racial identity politics, discourses on gender, and discussions of black nationalism/ Pan-Africanism.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 106