Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AFST 170-01 African Civilizations to 1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 170-01. This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as HIST 170.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
AFST 200-01 Approaches to Africana Studies
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
This course will investigate the importance of conceptual analysis and the development of concepts in the theoretical and textual research of Africana Studies. Thus, the course will focus on various interpretive frameworks and approaches to organizing and understanding Africana Studies, including but not limited to the African model, Afrocentricity, diaspora model, critical race theory, post-modernism, and post colonialism. Prerequisite: 100.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 206
AFST 220-01 Modern N. Africa from French Invasion to Arab Spring
Instructor: Burleigh Hendrickson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-03 and MEST 200-02. In spite of its unique geographic position as a trade hub and a bridge between the cultures of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, North Africa (the Maghreb) has long been overlooked in narratives of world history. From the establishment of French colonialism to the Arab Spring, the centralization of power and the power of revolt have played critical roles in defining the cultures, politics, and histories of the modern Maghreb. Using authority and resistance as organizing themes, this course explores the complex issues of multiculturalism, nationalism, and state-society relations in this dynamic region.
0900:TR   STERN 103
AFST 220-02 The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 272-01 and LALC 272-01. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic-an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
AFST 220-03 African Americans Since Slavery
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 273-01. Focuses on the history of Americans of African ancestry in the years following the American Civil War, which ended in 1865. The course examines several important transformations of African Americans as a people. In the first, we consider the transition from slavery to a nominal but highly circumscribed "freedom," which ended with the destruction of Reconstruction governments in the South. We consider the institution-building and community-building processes among African Americans, and the development of distinctive elite and folk cultures among various classes of black people. We examine the Great Migration north and west between 1900 and 1920, and the urbanization of what had been a predominately rural people. Fifth, we consider the differential impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and the New Deal and World War II on African Americans, and the creation of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's - 1980's
1330:MR   DENNY 313
AFST 220-04 Gender in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-01 and WGSS 202-01. This course introduces students to perspectives on and experiences of gender in Africa today and in the recent past using an ethnographic lens. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and films, we will consider the diverse ways people have constructed gender in their everyday lives in different parts of Africa; how people have shaped gendered knowledge and identities in cultural, social, historical, and political-economic contexts; and how matters of gender have been represented in scholarship, popular media, activism, and policy realms. A central concern of ours will be with gender in peoples practical, everyday lives: how gender is crucial to understanding politics, economics, development, social life, popular culture, and other aspects of peoples lives in Africa. A consistent theme in our diverse readings is the changing terrain of gender relations in the contexts of Africas long-term entanglements with global forces, particularly those of recent decades.
1500:MR   DENNY 311
AFST 220-05 African Government & Politics
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 252-01. An introduction to the politics of contemporary, sub-Saharan Africa. After analyzing the historical and socio-economic context of African politics, the course examines a number of contrasting political systems in depth. The final section of the course discusses the current problems of South Africa from an international perspective.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
AFST 220-06 One Drop, Two Drops: Cultural Understandings of Black Multiraciality
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-02. This course will explore notions of black multiraciality that have existed in the U.S. from the colonial era and continue to have traction in our present day. To facilitate this exploration, we will discuss the emergence of certain ideas and their historical contexts, such as the one-drop rule (rule of hypodescent) and the tragic mulatta/o trope. We will also discuss the Census Movement, which emerged in the 1990s to change how people can identify racially and ethnically on the U.S. Census. Throughout the course, we will examine the literature, art, and other cultural productions about and/or from mixed race people of African descent. This will allow us to compare and contrast ideas circulating in U.S. law and the social sciences to ideas that are in the register of cultural representation.
1030:TR   DENNY 304
AFST 220-07 U.S. and African Foodscapes
Instructor: Jane Battersby
Course Description:
This course starts with a series of sessions on how food has been framed (food as basic need, food as commodity, food as nutrition, food as a right etc.) in the US and Africa, which would provide the basis to consider how food has been and is engaged by policy makers, the private sector and communities global, and in the two regions in question. The course would then have a series of thematic sessions considering key components of the food system and how they manifest in the regions. These sessions will focus on what these components are, how policy makers and planners have engaged them, how researchers have engaged them and why these differences and similarities matter. These components would include commercial agriculture, urban agriculture, retail/food deserts, social protection, nutritional guidelines inter alia. The course will include at least two experiential learning excursions in the community, one based on retail and the other on production.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 110
AFST 320-01 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 321-03 and WGSS 301-03. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
AFST 500-01 Black Boy Stories: The Conspiracies Surrounding Our Mental Health
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
 
AFST 500-02 Sports and African Identity
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
 
AFST 500-03 The Complexities of Names & Identity in Africa for Returning Descendants
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in AMST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
AMST 200-02 One Drop, Two Drops: Cultural Understandings of Black Multiraciality
Instructor: Stacey Moultry
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06. This course will explore notions of black multiraciality that have existed in the U.S. from the colonial era and continue to have traction in our present day. To facilitate this exploration, we will discuss the emergence of certain ideas and their historical contexts, such as the one-drop rule (rule of hypodescent) and the tragic mulatta/o trope. We will also discuss the Census Movement, which emerged in the 1990s to change how people can identify racially and ethnically on the U.S. Census. Throughout the course, we will examine the literature, art, and other cultural productions about and/or from mixed race people of African descent. This will allow us to compare and contrast ideas circulating in U.S. law and the social sciences to ideas that are in the register of cultural representation.
1030:TR   DENNY 304
Courses Offered in ANTH
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ANTH 245-01 Gender in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04 and WGSS 202-01. This course introduces students to perspectives on and experiences of gender in Africa today and in the recent past using an ethnographic lens. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and films, we will consider the diverse ways people have constructed gender in their everyday lives in different parts of Africa; how people have shaped gendered knowledge and identities in cultural, social, historical, and political-economic contexts; and how matters of gender have been represented in scholarship, popular media, activism, and policy realms. A central concern of ours will be with gender in peoples practical, everyday lives: how gender is crucial to understanding politics, economics, development, social life, popular culture, and other aspects of peoples lives in Africa. A consistent theme in our diverse readings is the changing terrain of gender relations in the contexts of Africas long-term entanglements with global forces, particularly those of recent decades.
1500:MR   DENNY 204
Courses Offered in ENGL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ENGL 321-03 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and WGSS 301-03. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110
Courses Offered in FREN
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
FREN 246-01 Introduction to Francophone Cultures
Instructor: Mireille Rebeiz
Course Description:
This course explores the relationship between literature and Francophone cultures (Vietnam, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa). Topics include: "Ngritude," the negro-African identity, "cultural mtissage," the status of women, the dialogue between tradition and modernity, independence, and post-colonial disillusionment. Historical overview of the international context of Francophonie will be examined through short stories, novels, poems, critical essays, feature and documentary films. Prerequisite: 236.
1330:TF   LIBRY ALDEN
Courses Offered in HIST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 170-01 African Civilizations to 1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 170-01. This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as AFST 170.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
HIST 215-03 Modern N. Africa from French Invasion to Arab Spring
Instructor: Burleigh Hendrickson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and MEST 200-02. In spite of its unique geographic position as a trade hub and a bridge between the cultures of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, North Africa (the Maghreb) has long been overlooked in narratives of world history. From the establishment of French colonialism to the Arab Spring, the centralization of power and the power of revolt have played critical roles in defining the cultures, politics, and histories of the modern Maghreb. Using authority and resistance as organizing themes, this course explores the complex issues of multiculturalism, nationalism, and state-society relations in this dynamic region.
0900:TR   STERN 103
HIST 272-01 The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02 and LALC 272-01. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic-an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world. This course is cross-listed as LALC 272. Offered every two years.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
HIST 273-01 African Americans Since Slavery
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03. Focuses on the history of Americans of African ancestry in the years following the American Civil War, which ended in 1865. The course examines several important transformations of African Americans as a people. In the first, we consider the transition from slavery to a nominal but highly circumscribed "freedom," which ended with the destruction of Reconstruction governments in the South. We consider the institution-building and community-building processes among African Americans, and the development of distinctive elite and folk cultures among various classes of black people. We examine the Great Migration north and west between 1900 and 1920, and the urbanization of what had been a predominately rural people. Fifth, we consider the differential impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and the New Deal and World War II on African Americans, and the creation of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's - 1980's. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
Courses Offered in ITAL
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ITAL 323-01 From Diaspora to Empire: Italian Colonialism in the Greater Middle East
Instructor: Tullio Pagano
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-03. In this class, we will study how various Italian governments after the unification tried to create a "greater Italy" by colonizing vast portions of East Africa and Libya. Which rhetorical strategies were used to convince Italian citizens, many of whom were emigrating to the Americas to escape poverty, to espouse this imperialist ideology? How did Mussolini manage to create an empire in the 1930s? How did African governments and citizens of African descent living in US and elsewhere respond to Italy's imperialism? Finally, what were the consequences of Italian colonialism? To answer these questions, we will read historical and fictional works and screen movies and documentaries authored by both European and African authors. The class will be taught in English and all the materials will be available in English as well. Advanced students of Italian may take this class as a Foreign Language integrated Class (FLIC), and do some of the coursework in Italian.
1500:MR   BOSLER 213
Courses Offered in LALC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LALC 272-01 The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 272-01 and AFST 220-02. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic-an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world. This course is cross-listed as HIST 272. Offered every two years.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
Courses Offered in MEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEST 200-02 Modern N. Africa from French Invasion to Arab Spring
Instructor: Burleigh Hendrickson, David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and HIST 215-03. In spite of its unique geographic position as a trade hub and a bridge between the cultures of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, North Africa (the Maghreb) has long been overlooked in narratives of world history. From the establishment of French colonialism to the Arab Spring, the centralization of power and the power of revolt have played critical roles in defining the cultures, politics, and histories of the modern Maghreb. Using authority and resistance as organizing themes, this course explores the complex issues of multiculturalism, nationalism, and state-society relations in this dynamic region.
0900:TR   STERN 103
MEST 200-03 From Diaspora to Empire: Italian Colonialism in the Greater Middle East
Instructor: Tullio Pagano
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ITAL 323-01. In this class, we will study how various Italian governments after the unification tried to create a "greater Italy" by colonizing vast portions of East Africa and Libya. Which rhetorical strategies were used to convince Italian citizens, many of whom were emigrating to the Americas to escape poverty, to espouse this imperialist ideology? How did Mussolini manage to create an empire in the 1930s? How did African governments and citizens of African descent living in US and elsewhere respond to Italy's imperialism? Finally, what were the consequences of Italian colonialism? To answer these questions, we will read historical and fictional works and screen movies and documentaries authored by both European and African authors. The class will be taught in English and all the materials will be available in English as well. Advanced students of Italian may take this class as a Foreign Language integrated Class (FLIC), and do some of the coursework in Italian.
1500:MR   BOSLER 213
Courses Offered in POSC
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
POSC 252-01 African Government & Politics
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-05. An introduction to the politics of contemporary Africa. After reviewing the large historical, international, and socio-economic patterns of African politics, the course examines in greater depth a sampling of national political systems and salient regional or continent-wide themes. Prerequisite: one course in political science.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
Courses Offered in WGSS
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
WGSS 202-01 Gender in Africa
Instructor: James Ellison
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04 and ANTH 245-01. This course introduces students to perspectives on and experiences of gender in Africa today and in the recent past using an ethnographic lens. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and films, we will consider the diverse ways people have constructed gender in their everyday lives in different parts of Africa; how people have shaped gendered knowledge and identities in cultural, social, historical, and political-economic contexts; and how matters of gender have been represented in scholarship, popular media, activism, and policy realms. A central concern of ours will be with gender in peoples practical, everyday lives: how gender is crucial to understanding politics, economics, development, social life, popular culture, and other aspects of peoples lives in Africa. A consistent theme in our diverse readings is the changing terrain of gender relations in the contexts of Africas long-term entanglements with global forces, particularly those of recent decades.
1500:MR   DENNY 311
WGSS 202-02 Reproductive Justice
Instructor: Kathryn Oliviero
Course Description:
How can the choice in prochoice become real for women with a range of abilities, ethnicities, economic backgrounds or gender and sexual identifications? What does it look like to not only provide affordable access to birth control and abortion, but to also create the political conditions that enable people to choose to have children in an environment where both will thrive, rather than just survive? Creating these political conditions requires reproductive justice: a global social movement strategy and human rights platform that places reproductive power in the context of the larger social, racial and economic well-being of women, communities and families (Ross 2011). This course explores the origins and applications of reproductive justice. It investigates how the reproductive lives of many people, particularly women of color, are embedded in embattled legal, social, economic, racial and national frameworks that shape their capacity to control their intimate and procreative lives. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course first maps reproductive justices origins, exploring: political philosophies of sexual and reproductive liberty; racialized and disability-based histories of eugenics, population control, and adoption; the black womens health movement; birth control and abortion law; social welfare and healthcare politics; the reproductive politics of incarceration and state violence; disability and prenatal testing; and the transnational and LGBTQ applications of assisted reproductive technologies. The course will subsequently explore how reproductive justice platforms can enable diverse people to thrive: making the decision to prevent, terminate or have a pregnancy a real choice. It will assess the conditions that enable access to quality health care, economic security, racial justice, womens equality, transgender and queer rights, environmental sustainability, disability justice, sexual autonomy, and community vitality.
1030:TR   DENNY 204
WGSS 301-03 Toni Morrison
Instructor: Lynn Johnson
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and ENGL 321-03. This course explores the imaginative and critical works of Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison. We will begin the semester by tracing Morrison's development as a novelist, paying particular attention to the ways in which she crafts her novels and employs them to provide provocative commentaries on Black identity and culture. In our analyses of these works, we will use such critical lenses as Afrocentricism, psychoanalytic theory, Black feminism, Womanism, and Marxism. Subsequently, we will study Morrison as a playwright and literary critic. We will consider Morrison's claim that classic American Literature is often informed by the Africanist presence.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 110